Author Topic: Fuel bottles for camping  (Read 11937 times)

Fuel bottles for camping
« on: February 14, 2010, 09:05:38 am »
Ok, so we now have a Trangia stove (meths) and are looking at fuel bottles.
There seems quite a choice available, any recomendations other that Trangia which tbh seem quite expensive. Or is there a reason why?
Thanks in advance.

andygates

  • Peroxide Viking
Re: Fuel bottles for camping
« Reply #1 on: February 14, 2010, 09:24:30 am »
They're indestructible and don't fume so when you get home or are in-tent, they store as well as they travel. 

Sigg do similar; Sigg ain't cheap either.
It takes blood and guts to be this cool but I'm still just a cliché.
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toekneep

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Re: Fuel bottles for camping
« Reply #2 on: February 14, 2010, 09:36:43 am »
I have the Trangia one,  it replaced an ancient Sigg bottle. As a secure container they are equal but the pouring arrangement on the Trangia bottle is superior.

Re: Fuel bottles for camping
« Reply #3 on: February 14, 2010, 09:42:21 am »
What Andy says re Trangia bottle.
During most of my trangia-using days I simply carried fuel in the bottle in which it came from the chemists (UK) or supermarket (France, Germany &c) - no problems at all. With the Trangia bottle you have to check and double-check and triple-check that the two screw caps are fully secure. I learned this the hard way  :(


Re: Fuel bottles for camping
« Reply #4 on: February 14, 2010, 10:32:39 am »
I use either a 0.6L Sigg imitation or a 1L Trangia bottle.  Whichever one I take I use the Trangia pourer/top. It's an excellent  piece of kit.

Not fast & rarely furious

tweeting occasional in(s)anities as andrewxclark

Re: Fuel bottles for camping
« Reply #5 on: February 14, 2010, 10:35:24 am »
Buy the Trangia one - one off purchase and designed for the job  :thumbsup:

nuff said ...............

andym

  • Expat Cyclist
    • AndysRockets
Re: Fuel bottles for camping
« Reply #6 on: February 14, 2010, 10:35:57 am »
I have a Sigg type fuel bottle (complete with fuel markings etc.), but after so many years it went a bit corroded inside.  If you take that route, everytime it is almost empty, I'd swill out any sludge before refilling.
Also the screw top can become very tight, so I almost always need a lever (usually camp knife) to open the thing.  They do store, but if stored for too long, they either evaporate the alcohol, or soak up water, so the fuel becomes diluted... or something.
Since I usually go camping by car these days, I just take the plastic bottles that the meths comes in.
AndyM

redshift

  • High Priestess of wires
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Re: Fuel bottles for camping
« Reply #7 on: February 14, 2010, 10:49:32 am »
Don't use Aluminium - it corrodes when in contact with meths, which strips the oxide protection off.  If the Sigg bottle is the one I'm thinking of, it's lined inside with a plastic coating, but eventually that could be damaged and you'll get corrosion.  For the same reason you should always keep the burner in a plastic bag when you carry it inside the stove, especially if you have the Al pans.  I simply bit the bullet and bought the Trangia bottle, which is plastic, and as the others have said, has the nifty little vent/pourer arrangement on top. 
L
:)
Windcheetah No. 176
The all-round entertainer gets quite arsey,
They won't translate his lame shit into Farsi
Somehow to let it go would be more classy…

Re: Fuel bottles for camping
« Reply #8 on: February 14, 2010, 10:55:40 am »
I used to use a plastic bag to store the burner inside the panset, but last year bought a small sealed container (the type with tabs to seal the lid in place). Much less meths tainting with this method.
Not fast & rarely furious

tweeting occasional in(s)anities as andrewxclark

Re: Fuel bottles for camping
« Reply #9 on: February 14, 2010, 11:03:10 am »
I have both sizes of the Trangia bottles.  They are excellent, one off purchases and will last for many years.   A purchase well worth making.

Re: Fuel bottles for camping
« Reply #10 on: February 14, 2010, 02:57:18 pm »
Cheers, thanks for all the replies
Trangia bottle it is then  :thumbsup:

Re: Fuel bottles for camping
« Reply #11 on: February 14, 2010, 07:14:00 pm »
I don't see what's wrong with the 500ml plastic bottles that the meths comes in.  I've never had one leak or crack, they pour just fine and they're cheaper and lighter then the Sigg or Trangia bottles.

If anyone wants a 0.6 litre Sigg fuel bottle I've got one that I don't use.  PM me.

Kim

  • 2nd in the world
Re: Fuel bottles for camping
« Reply #12 on: February 14, 2010, 08:26:00 pm »
Supplemental question: which are standard bike water bottle diameter, so you can put them in a bottle holder (rules out the 500ml bottles meths comes in, for example).

For a weekend or less, I have a re-purposed 150ml nail polish remover bottle, which will fit inside the Trangia along with the burner.
To ride the Windcheetah, first, you must embrace the cantilever...

Re: Fuel bottles for camping
« Reply #13 on: February 14, 2010, 10:23:52 pm »
A .6L bottle should fit a standard type bottle holder. I've used on under the downtube with no problem.  For a more secure fit I use a "Bikebuddy" carrier for the 1L Trangia bottle.
Not fast & rarely furious

tweeting occasional in(s)anities as andrewxclark

Kim

  • 2nd in the world
Re: Fuel bottles for camping
« Reply #14 on: March 17, 2010, 01:00:32 pm »
Okay, I've come up with what seems like a fairly reasonable solution:

From reading around, it seems that 0.6l Sigg fuel bottles are an endangered species.  It also seems that un-coated aluminium water bottles, while fine for paraffin or similar, don't get on with methanol long-term.  The Trangia bottle top is highly recommended, and having had a play with it, this is for good reason - it really does make pouring easy.

On this basis, when I came across a 0.5l Trangia fuel bottle on sale for about the same price as the lid by itself, I went ahead and bought it.  For reference, this bottle is made of polythene and is rated for "fuel alcohols, kerosene and gasoline", but should not be pressurised.

Now, this bottle is significantly narrower than a standard water bottle, so how best to carry it on the bike (I dismissed "in the panniers" as tempting fate, though it does seem reasonably leak-proof)?  The Topeak Modula EX bottle cage seems to be highly regarded as a solution for non-standard bottle-shaped loads.  At £3.99 including postage, I bought one too.

The adjustable mechanism works as intended, and can be set to fit the Trangia bottle perfectly.  It should also do a reasonable job on most disposable soft drink bottles you're likely to encounter.  The only problem is that it has the usual lip, which the Trangia bottle lacks a notch for.  This isn't actually a huge problem, as it means the bottle just sits at a slight angle, the adjustable mechanism holding the bottom end securely.  However being a perfectionist (or at least a botcher, I'm not sure which), I dug the Dremel out and had a go at the lip, cutting it down by a centimetre or so into a slight 'V' shape.  The result is a bottle cage that fits the Trangia bottle perfectly, and can be adjusted to take water bottles as needed, for a lot less than the cost of a Bikebuddy:


click for more pictures
To ride the Windcheetah, first, you must embrace the cantilever...

andygates

  • Peroxide Viking
Re: Fuel bottles for camping
« Reply #15 on: March 17, 2010, 01:11:49 pm »
Nice one. :thumbsup:

If it's being slung under the downtube (common for the long haul set) don't forget a strap to stop it bouncing out. 
It takes blood and guts to be this cool but I'm still just a cliché.
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Charlotte

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Re: Fuel bottles for camping
« Reply #16 on: March 17, 2010, 01:16:23 pm »
Genius bit of work there, Kim.

Handy for being able to take a swig of meths on the go as well  :D
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Kim

  • 2nd in the world
Re: Fuel bottles for camping
« Reply #17 on: March 17, 2010, 01:30:06 pm »
If it's being slung under the downtube (common for the long haul set) don't forget a strap to stop it bouncing out.  

Yeah, while it's fine in the usual orientations, I think this would definitely be needed if mounted upside-down.

Academic for me, as my 'touring' bike, being a hybrid, has a mess of cables (gear and electrical) under the downtube, rather than bottle cage braze-ons.  My pragmatic solution is a single water bottle, and additional water in an Ortlieb water carrier strapped to the rear rack if necessary.
To ride the Windcheetah, first, you must embrace the cantilever...

Re: Fuel bottles for camping
« Reply #18 on: April 12, 2010, 05:51:51 pm »
Kim, do you think that this would also work with a one litre bottle?

Kim

  • 2nd in the world
Re: Fuel bottles for camping
« Reply #19 on: April 12, 2010, 07:58:40 pm »
Kim, do you think that this would also work with a one litre bottle?

Not having one to hand, I can only guess about the diameter.  The Modula EX expands to normal bike water bottle diameter.  With a larger bottle, I'd definitely want a strap to keep the bottle in place.
To ride the Windcheetah, first, you must embrace the cantilever...

Re: Fuel bottles for camping
« Reply #20 on: April 13, 2010, 01:06:41 pm »
I have got a feeling the 1 Litre bottle might be to big for a normal bottle holder. I might have to go with the bike buddy option  :-\

Kim

  • 2nd in the world
Re: Fuel bottles for camping
« Reply #21 on: April 13, 2010, 01:16:53 pm »
I have got a feeling the 1 Litre bottle might be to big for a normal bottle holder. I might have to go with the bike buddy option  :-\

Hmm, how about the Modula XL?
To ride the Windcheetah, first, you must embrace the cantilever...

Re: Fuel bottles for camping
« Reply #22 on: October 17, 2011, 05:56:49 pm »
Interesting Kim.

How's about this for those worried about the tempations of the orange/yellow adjuster to thieves?

http://www.chainreactioncycles.com/Models.aspx?ModelID=68036

I assume it's pretty much the same cage/system but just with a different adjuster/bit more metal?

<edited for a typo>

Re: Fuel bottles for camping
« Reply #23 on: October 18, 2011, 12:39:52 pm »
A word of warning.

A couple of years back I bought an MSR petrol stove. USE ONLY MSR FUEL BOTTLE said the instructions. Pish thought I, the Yorkshire man in me coming to the fore. I'm not buying another fuel bottle, the Sigg fits perfectly.

After pressuring the bottle I lit the stove and all was going well until a small spray of fuel vapour started from the bottle neck. A few seconds later my mates were treated to the amusing spectacle of me kicking my MSR across the hard standing where I'd lit it. Once out of the burning pool of petrol I managed to turn the stove off safely. Darn good job it wasn't in the middle of a crowded campsite  :o

Needlass to say the MSR bottle I subsequently bought worked without drama.

Aushiker

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Re: Fuel bottles for camping
« Reply #24 on: August 07, 2012, 11:10:51 am »
I appreciate that I am bringing an old thread back alive but my question is on the topic of Trangia fuel bottles so thought asking here was the best option. 

I am hopping someone can advise the diamater of both the 500 ( or is it 600 ml?) and the 1 litre Trangia fuel bottles. I am looking to carry them in the Ortlieb pannier bottle cages.  The 1 litre bottles that methylated spirits come in here are just to large for the cages.

Thanks in advance
Andrew