Author Topic: PBP - Who won?  (Read 3909 times)

PBP - Who won?
« on: August 25, 2011, 06:51:53 PM »
Anyone know the time?

Some of the vedettes I saw in very first group all seem to have been around 44hrs 12mins but I don't know if anyone broke away for the win!

Watching a control for those boys was a real highlight of the ride for me! They are quite something.

mcshroom

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Re: PBP - Who won?
« Reply #1 on: August 25, 2011, 06:52:56 PM »
Everyone who got round won :D
"In down times I do things like go for a long bike ride or run. The other thing I'm doing in that quiet time is just observing." - Robin Williams

Re: PBP - Who won?
« Reply #2 on: August 25, 2011, 07:04:58 PM »
Likewise interested. I saw some of the fast boys returning off Roc Trevezel including a couple of the Rapha-sponsored Italians (judging by the kit they were wearing  ;) - I can't find the relevant article on the Rapha page at the moment ) but it was a section of the course where we used different roads out and back so I didn't get to see the lead pack. I bet that would have been a spectacle (albeit a short-lived one!).

Is there a forum or news page that has such information?

Re: PBP - Who won?
« Reply #3 on: August 25, 2011, 07:22:32 PM »
I saw the lead pack control at loudeac (needless to say, me on way out, them on way back) and it was astonishing to watch, almost grotesque as someone is shovelling food in one end of the rider and someone else is busy, hands down shorts, cleaning the other!

I in no way wish to take away from everyone's performance, but there is still this small part of PBP about the actual winner. I just wondered if there was anyone faster than 44hr 12 (I just entered a couple of the numbers of that group to see their times (0009 etc.)

Simonb

Re: PBP - Who won?
« Reply #4 on: August 25, 2011, 07:24:53 PM »
there is still this small part of PBP about the actual winner

No there isn't. There is just the first rider back. It earns respect, but it's not the same thing.

Re: PBP - Who won?
« Reply #5 on: August 25, 2011, 07:48:14 PM »
there is still this small part of PBP about the actual winner

No there isn't. There is just the first rider back. It earns respect, but it's not the same thing.
Check the helmet sticker. ;)
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Re: PBP - Who won?
« Reply #6 on: August 25, 2011, 07:57:24 PM »
Everyone who took part in the event was a winner.

Justin(e)

  • On my way out of here
Re: PBP - Who won?
« Reply #7 on: August 25, 2011, 09:55:28 PM »
Everyone who took part in the event was a winner.

Yes, of course everyone know that.

But who really won?

Re: PBP - Who won?
« Reply #8 on: August 26, 2011, 08:51:21 AM »
It's difficult to say because some people will have just turned around and headed back to a control to abandon. However, based on my calculations it seems that when I saw the german rider who finished LEL first on his own sometime after Tinteniac, it would seem that he would have been the first rider on the road by a long margin. Naturally he looked fresh and serene tapping out a respectable pace.

Re: PBP - Who won?
« Reply #9 on: August 26, 2011, 10:20:58 AM »
My friend from the US was the last rider allowed to continue on the course. He completed but well out of time.

Re: PBP - Who won?
« Reply #10 on: August 26, 2011, 10:40:04 AM »
According to today's L'Equipe the first riders back were Christophe Bocquet, Marc Védrinelle, André Lalenti and Tony Largeau. They reached Brest at 12.54pm on Monday and SQY by 12.23pm on Tuesday. A total time of 44h 13' and average speed of 27.8 kmh.

This is from a good two page feature on PBP which  includes a picture of Drew Buck and his 1900 vélo sans dérailleur.

Re: PBP - Who won?
« Reply #11 on: August 26, 2011, 12:50:42 PM »
The rules clearly state that PBP is not a race so there cannot be a winner also with all the different start grids, first finisher does not mean first overall also don't forget many of the lead riders have support at the controls, where loads of time is lost by unsupported riders.  I think PBP should clearly identify supported riders from unsupported as the latter are the true randoneurs and their achievement is really the one that counts in the world of audax. There is an article on PBP website here that clearly describes their view of racing http://www.paris-brest-paris.org/pbp2011/index2.php?lang=en&cat=presentation&page=competition_ou_rando

Re: PBP - Who won?
« Reply #12 on: August 26, 2011, 12:57:42 PM »
The rules clearly state that PBP is not a race so there cannot be a winner also with all the different start grids, first finisher does not mean first overall also don't forget many of the lead riders have support at the controls, where loads of time is lost by unsupported riders.  I think PBP should clearly identify supported riders from unsupported as the latter are the true randdoneurs and their achievement is really the one that counts in the world of audax. There is an article on PBP website here that clearly describes their view of racing http://www.paris-brest-paris.org/pbp2011/index2.php?lang=en&cat=presentation&page=competition_ou_rando

the 90 hour group are actually Touristes, the 84s are the proper Randoneurs with the 15km/h minimum speed ;)

Re: PBP - Who won?
« Reply #13 on: August 26, 2011, 01:18:59 PM »
the 90 hour group are actually Touristes, the 84s are the proper Randoneurs with the 15km/h minimum speed ;)
Wrong group - 1200km @ 15kph = 80 hours

Re: PBP - Who won?
« Reply #14 on: August 26, 2011, 01:20:42 PM »
Personally I "felt" supported all the way even though I was totally self-sufficient (no bag drops, family, etc.), because of the incredible attitude of the French.

Re: PBP - Who won?
« Reply #15 on: August 26, 2011, 01:30:25 PM »
the 90 hour group are actually Touristes, the 84s are the proper Randoneurs with the 15km/h minimum speed ;)
Wrong group - 1200km @ 15kph = 80 hours
Good call, they call the 84s Randoneurs though, 90s Touristes.

CrazyEnglishTriathlete

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Re: PBP - Who won?
« Reply #16 on: August 26, 2011, 01:51:35 PM »
Being pedantic - it was 1230km - so 80 hours is an average of 15.375kph and 82 hours is the 15kph average.   ::-)
Approximate Eddington Numbers 107 (imperial), 150 (metric)
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Re: PBP - Who won?
« Reply #17 on: August 26, 2011, 02:34:38 PM »
Being pedantic - it was 1230km - so 80 hours is an average of 15.375kph and 82 hours is the 15kph average.   ::-)

Being even more pedantic, the over distance is irrelevant for BRM. The average is based on 1200.

Re: PBP - Who won?
« Reply #18 on: August 26, 2011, 07:57:41 PM »
That route was over 1240, don't care what the card was saying. All three riders i finished with had clocked 1240+
Brummie turned Country Bumkin

Re: PBP - Who won?
« Reply #19 on: August 26, 2011, 10:00:52 PM »
The rules clearly state that PBP is not a race so there cannot be a winner also with all the different start grids, first finisher does not mean first overall also don't forget many of the lead riders have support at the controls, where loads of time is lost by unsupported riders.  I think PBP should clearly identify supported riders from unsupported as the latter are the true randoneurs and their achievement is really the one that counts in the world of audax. There is an article on PBP website here that clearly describes their view of racing http://www.paris-brest-paris.org/pbp2011/index2.php?lang=en&cat=presentation&page=competition_ou_rando

You're absolutely right there. Also they should identify riders who made use of the free stuff offered by unofficial roadside stands because that will have saved them a lot of time as well, not having to queue and pay in shops. You could also identify riders who rode as part of large groups and how much work that they did at the front. Mind you, if you're going to identify riders who were supported then categorise them because some support vehicles were parked a long way off route and that doesn't save a lot of time. I know this because Maidenhead Phil is usually a little bit faster than me and even though I was supported he was a little bit faster than me. (Kudos Phil, you're just a good rider).

Yes, I know I should have ridden unsupported but my girlfriend was quite insistent and the last time I told her to stop ruining everything it made things a tad awkward and uncomfortable so I kind of had to let her some along and do things for me. So as I apparently haven't done PBP, care to tell me what it's like?

Re: PBP - Who won?
« Reply #20 on: August 26, 2011, 10:09:40 PM »
There is an article on PBP website here that clearly describes their view of racing http://www.paris-brest-paris.org/pbp2011/index2.php?lang=en&cat=presentation&page=competition_ou_rando

Oh dear, the group I finished with appear to have broken unwritten rule 3 by indulging in comedy sprinting to the finish from Trappes .  It was fun though   ;D

Re: PBP - Who won?
« Reply #21 on: August 27, 2011, 12:08:55 PM »
You're absolutely right there. Also they should identify riders who made use of the free stuff offered by unofficial roadside stands because that will have saved them a lot of time as well, not having to queue and pay in shops. You could also identify riders who rode as part of large groups and how much work that they did at the front.

...

So as I apparently haven't done PBP, care to tell me what it's like?

Calm down dear, it's just a bike ride!

The guy camping next to me did a 52h ride. He had no bag drop and no support. That's pretty good compared with 44h pampered, IMO. It doesn't mean that the supported guys didn't ride 1200km but they sure as hell didn't do the same ride. I spent 26 hours off the bike, not sleeping...

Simonb

Re: PBP - Who won?
« Reply #22 on: August 27, 2011, 01:55:52 PM »
On Robert Gray's advice, next time I think I'll take a musette and bung in comestibles from the controls and eat them on the move. Won't go down the 100% supported route.

Was talking to a supporter at Dreux who was amazed to hear that British riders don't generally have camper vans. This was after I'd asked where the dortoir was. "The what?", he'd replied. In any case I had no use for it.

nicknack

  • Fledgling Swampy
Re: PBP - Who won?
« Reply #23 on: August 27, 2011, 01:59:18 PM »
On Robert Gray's advice, next time I think I'll take a musette and bung in comestibles from the controls and eat them on the move. Won't go down the 100% supported route.

S'funny - every time I see that I think of this and wonder, "What good would that do?".
This old man came rolling home.

Re: PBP - Who won?
« Reply #24 on: August 27, 2011, 06:40:14 PM »
It doesn't mean that the supported guys didn't ride 1200km but they sure as hell didn't do the same ride. I spent 26 hours off the bike, not sleeping...

Yes and... what's your point?

I did about the same there.