Author Topic: Cities fit for cycling  (Read 12432 times)

Cities fit for cycling
« on: February 02, 2012, 12:07:22 am »
The Times is running a very special front page tomorrow, sneak peek here: http://twitpic.com/8ehuh2


They're launching a cycle safety campaign called Cities Fit for Cycling, with this manifesto:
   
* Trucks entering a city centre should be required by law to fit censors, audible truck-turning alarms, extra mirrors and safety bars to stop cyclists being thrown under the wheels.
   
* The 500 most dangerous road junctions must be identified, redesigned or fitted with priority traffic lights for cyclists and Trixi mirrors that allow lorry drivers to see cyclists on their near-side.
   
* A national audit of cycling to find out how many people cycle in Britain and how cyclists are killed or injured should be held to underpin effective cycle safety.
   
* Two per cent of the Highways Agency budget should be earmarked for next generation cycle routes, providing £100 million a year towards world-class cycling infrastructure. Each year cities should be graded on the quality of cycling provision.
   
* The training of cyclists and drivers must improve and cycle safety should become a core part of the driving test.
   
* 20mph should become the default speed limit in residential areas where there are no cycle lanes.
   
* Businesses should be invited to sponsor cycleways and cycling super-highways, mirroring the Barclays-backed bicycle hire scheme in London.
   
* Every city, even those without an elected mayor, should appoint a cycling commissioner to push home reforms.


You can sign up and support it here:

http://www.thetimes.co.uk/tto/public/cyclesafety/contact/

Pedaldog

  • M' back!
  • Head Banger.
Re: Cities fit for cycling
« Reply #1 on: February 02, 2012, 12:55:16 am »
Thanks for the link. Been there, done the pledge and writed an paragraff!

Re: Cities fit for cycling
« Reply #2 on: February 02, 2012, 06:10:40 am »
In the video with Gaz, 1:04 is my clip, nearly over the bonnet.
Your Royal Charles are belong to us.

jane

  • Mad pie-hating female
Re: Cities fit for cycling
« Reply #3 on: February 02, 2012, 06:43:52 am »
Cynthia Barlow. She's a real hero for me.  Immensely brave and resourceful woman. 

Re: Cities fit for cycling
« Reply #4 on: February 02, 2012, 06:44:33 am »
I've signed, and made the suggestion in the comment that presumed liability should be on the list.  I doubt if they'd be pushing for it on just one suggestion - but if they keep getting that same suggestion (along with the point that it works well in the Netherlands and Germany) they might just take it on board.

Re: Cities fit for cycling
« Reply #5 on: February 02, 2012, 08:01:36 am »
Thanks for the link. Been there, done the pledge and writed an paragraff!

+1
Sic transit and all that..

David Martin

  • Thats Dr Oi You thankyouverymuch
Re: Cities fit for cycling
« Reply #6 on: February 02, 2012, 09:33:18 am »
   
* Trucks entering a city centre should be required by law to fit censors,

A freudian slip? Is that to stop the drivers talking nonsense?

Or is it to put a black pen through the speech bubble of the cyclist who is swearing at the driver after being nearly squished?

At least if we are going to have accidents, lets have polite British ones please.
"By creating we think. By living we learn" - Patrick Geddes

David Martin

  • Thats Dr Oi You thankyouverymuch
Re: Cities fit for cycling
« Reply #7 on: February 02, 2012, 09:35:55 am »
And +1 to the campaign, but remember "Cycling isn't dangerous. Driving huge trucks with limited visibility in crowded areas is dangerous"
"By creating we think. By living we learn" - Patrick Geddes

Re: Cities fit for cycling
« Reply #8 on: February 02, 2012, 09:43:31 am »
+1 signed.
Your Royal Charles are belong to us.

clarion

  • Tyke
Re: Cities fit for cycling
« Reply #9 on: February 02, 2012, 09:59:42 am »
   
* Trucks entering a city centre should be required by law to fit censors,

A freudian slip? Is that to stop the drivers talking nonsense?

Or is it to put a black pen through the speech bubble of the cyclist who is swearing at the driver after being nearly squished?

At least if we are going to have accidents, lets have polite British ones please.

That's obviously a mistake.  It should be censers, so you can smell them coming.
Getting there...

Re: Cities fit for cycling
« Reply #10 on: February 02, 2012, 10:10:29 am »
Thanks for the link. Been there, done the pledge and writed an paragraff!

+1
+2



Wowbagger

  • Dez's butler
    • Musings of a Gentleman Cyclist
Re: Cities fit for cycling
« Reply #11 on: February 02, 2012, 10:16:11 am »
Well, I never thought I'd sign up to something involving the Murdoch press. I feel as though I need a wash.

My paragraph highlighted the need for enforcement of existing law, particularly relating to speed limits, close overtaking and mobile phone use amongst drivers and suggested that the Times should launch a national advertising campaign aimed at educating drivers, but stopped short of suggesting that James Murdoch should get his mate Jeremy Clarkson to front it.

I also asked for a presumption of liability of motorists involved in collisions with cyclists & pedestrians.
Oh, Bach without any doubt. Bach every time for me.

Re: Cities fit for cycling
« Reply #12 on: February 02, 2012, 10:22:23 am »
Just added my pledge,

Seems to be allot of people on Facebook this morning linking to the page, normally followed by comments from their motoring friends about how a cyclist appeared out of nowhere and hit their car and how dangerous that is.

If the cyclist whose managed transubstantiation would like to come forward I'd find that really useful for getting to work on time.

Somewhat of a professional tea drinker.


Cudzoziemiec

  • Dormant but requires tea
Re: Cities fit for cycling
« Reply #13 on: February 02, 2012, 10:52:16 am »
Although I don't agree with all the details, it's great that a newspaper like The Times is doing this.

But what are "audible truck-turning alarms"?
At some point in the ride, you might find yourself in Osaka with Spanish speakers where you had expected Edinburgh talking Greek. This does not mean you are lost, or even off route.

Re: Cities fit for cycling
« Reply #14 on: February 02, 2012, 11:01:55 am »
Although I don't agree with all the details, it's great that a newspaper like The Times is doing this.

But what are "audible truck-turning alarms"?

Presumably similar to the "this vehicle is reversing, bleep bleep bleep" types?  "This vehicle is turning left, bleep bleep bleep"?



clarion

  • Tyke
Re: Cities fit for cycling
« Reply #15 on: February 02, 2012, 11:06:49 am »
Heard one of those yesterday.  The truck was in the right hand lane and the alarm came on with the indicators*.  I held back as we went along the street.  The truck neither turned left nor moved into the left hand lane.  I could have been through and away from the danger if I'd ignored it.  Equally, I could have been crushed.

* Which means that all those manoeuvres you see where the driver doesn't indicate?  Uh-huh, most of them, right?  They'll not have a warning.  The drivers who use their indicators are not principally the ones I'm bothered about. :facepalm:
Getting there...

Cudzoziemiec

  • Dormant but requires tea
Re: Cities fit for cycling
« Reply #16 on: February 02, 2012, 11:28:37 am »
Although I don't agree with all the details, it's great that a newspaper like The Times is doing this.

But what are "audible truck-turning alarms"?

Presumably similar to the "this vehicle is reversing, bleep bleep bleep" types?  "This vehicle is turning left, bleep bleep bleep"?
That's what I assumed. But I wasn't sure, partly because I've never heard one and partly because...
Heard one of those yesterday.  The truck was in the right hand lane and the alarm came on with the indicators*.  I held back as we went along the street.  The truck neither turned left nor moved into the left hand lane.  I could have been through and away from the danger if I'd ignored it.  Equally, I could have been crushed.

* Which means that all those manoeuvres you see where the driver doesn't indicate?  Uh-huh, most of them, right?  They'll not have a warning.  The drivers who use their indicators are not principally the ones I'm bothered about. :facepalm:
I can't see the point in them. Except, I suppose, as an arse-cover for the truck driver and operator.
At some point in the ride, you might find yourself in Osaka with Spanish speakers where you had expected Edinburgh talking Greek. This does not mean you are lost, or even off route.

Re: Cities fit for cycling
« Reply #17 on: February 02, 2012, 11:36:10 am »
Of course they're an arse-cover...as are the reversing ones! 

The one upside to the reversing one is that it ONLY comes on when you're actually likely to be going backwards...lol



Cudzoziemiec

  • Dormant but requires tea
Re: Cities fit for cycling
« Reply #18 on: February 02, 2012, 11:50:00 am »
The reversing ones do, I think, offer some benefit to other people because the lorry is reversing and it is a useful warning. As are reversing lights... but I suppose in goods yards etc people might well be behind the lorry and looking away from it. A turning alarm might have a "step away from the vehicle" effect in those situations, but I can't see what it's going to do on the road - other than add extra noise.
At some point in the ride, you might find yourself in Osaka with Spanish speakers where you had expected Edinburgh talking Greek. This does not mean you are lost, or even off route.

mattc

  • n.b. have grown beard since photo taken
    • Didcot Audaxes
Re: Cities fit for cycling
« Reply #19 on: February 02, 2012, 02:36:48 pm »

http://www.thetimes.co.uk/tto/public/cyclesafety/article3306502.ece

Kaya Burgess on his friend and colleague, whose journey to work ended in critical injury

The reality with any major issue is that it only truly touches you when it comes close to home. However regularly you may cycle on Britain’s city streets and however aware you are of the risks of doing so, it is not until you have seen one of your closest friends and colleagues stretchered off the tarmac from beneath the wheels of a lorry only yards from the office that the vulnerability of cyclists hits home.

...

(also posted in Tim's thread - wot the hell ... )
Has never ridden RAAM
---------
No.11  Because of the great host of those who dislike the least appearance of "swank " when they travel the roads and lanes. - From Kuklos' 39 Articles

Re: Cities fit for cycling
« Reply #20 on: February 02, 2012, 02:43:37 pm »
I seem to remember that the Independent launched a similar campaign late last year. There was lots of coverage for about 2 days and then it disappeared from view.

Perhaps the Times and the Independent might like to combine forces - or is that a step too far?

Re: Cities fit for cycling
« Reply #21 on: February 02, 2012, 02:56:01 pm »
In the video with Gaz, 1:04 is my clip, nearly over the bonnet.

Gaz (whoever he is, I don't know of him) comes across very well, measured, calm, reasonable and human. This is exactly what is needed rather than the shrill ranting that often accompanies this sort of thing.

Re: Cities fit for cycling
« Reply #22 on: February 02, 2012, 03:16:10 pm »
The reversing ones do, I think, offer some benefit to other people because the lorry is reversing and it is a useful warning. As are reversing lights... but I suppose in goods yards etc people might well be behind the lorry and looking away from it. A turning alarm might have a "step away from the vehicle" effect in those situations, but I can't see what it's going to do on the road - other than add extra noise.

You should never, ever reverse a large vehicle without a banksman where "people might well be behind the lorry".
If you did so in a goods yard/building site, H&S would be down on you like a ton of bricks.
Do the same on the public highway and H&S couldn't care less.
Quote from: tiermat
that's not science, it's semantics.

Re: Cities fit for cycling
« Reply #23 on: February 02, 2012, 03:51:10 pm »
In the video with Gaz, 1:04 is my clip, nearly over the bonnet.

Gaz (whoever he is, I don't know of him) comes across very well, measured, calm, reasonable and human. This is exactly what is needed rather than the shrill ranting that often accompanies this sort of thing.

He's great, isn't he? Nice bloke in person too. Has the CycleGaz youtube channel (previously Gaz545), and Silly Cyclists too.
Your Royal Charles are belong to us.

benborp

  • benbravoorpapa
Re: Cities fit for cycling
« Reply #24 on: February 02, 2012, 04:37:03 pm »
You should never, ever reverse a large vehicle without a banksman where "people might well be behind the lorry".
If you did so in a goods yard/building site, H&S would be down on you like a ton of bricks.
Do the same on the public highway and H&S couldn't care less.

The HSE's influence is very apparent in the theatre industry. Day to day rigging and lifting practices must conform to a whole raft of legislation and regulation. Introduce performers into the mix and safety factors, specific training routines and procedures jump to a whole new level. Introduce a member of the public (or several hundred) to the area of lifting or rigging and there is absolutely no doubt about the operators' requirement to ensure the safety of everyone involved. It is, rightly so, terrifying.
Theatres can be dangerous places. So can construction sites. Far more members of the public are killed or seriously injured each year as a consequence of the construction industry than by theatre; despite the fact that millions more people attend theatre events than set foot on construction sites.
This is a huge hole in the HSE's purpose of protecting people from work related injury.

Another thing that has struck me is that I spend a fair amount of my time trussed up in my own PPE with rescue equipment to hand, ready to intervene should anything go wrong with the sequences as they are performed. I'll be part of a team of half a dozen people specifically trained for each sequence. Once we stabilise any situation we would hand over to a team of 30 more that are well rehearsed (i.e. each day) in looking after the welfare of 500 people. Much of the rescue equipment is expensive and is good for one use only. In light of this, the arguments surrounding the expense and logistical difficulties of fitting extra safety equipment to lorries strike me as even more ludicrous. Or do I have an unrealistic view of the commercial world because I work in a sector that isn't expected to make a profit?
A world of bedlam trapped inside a small cyclist.