Author Topic: Reader's bodges  (Read 14015 times)

Reader's bodges
« on: April 08, 2008, 11:08:42 AM »
Here’s a thread for everyone to list their favourite bodges. 

What is a bodge?  I like to think of it as a repair or improvement that includes a little lateral thinking and doesn’t require buying an expensive new part from the bike shop.  Reuse, recycle, remanufacture.

Re: Reader's bodges
« Reply #1 on: April 08, 2008, 11:15:29 AM »
Here’s oldie but a goodie to start you off. 

Keeping your hub bodies clean.  Why bother with all that agro with the toothbrush between the spokes?  Just put a strap loosely around the hub (an Armstrong L1vestrong wrist band works well) and as the wheel turns the strap will jump about and stop most of the dirt accumulating.

Re: Reader's bodges
« Reply #2 on: April 08, 2008, 11:15:50 AM »
Things to do with old inner tubes #1.  Don’t spend your hard earned wedge on Marsas tape, just split the old inner tube open length ways, wind it around your handlebars, secure with a bit of electrical tape and put the normal bar tape on top.   Added comfort at no expense and one less tube on the landfill site.

Re: Reader's bodges
« Reply #3 on: April 08, 2008, 11:16:07 AM »
Elastometers

You've either an old MTB with elastometer suspension, or a folding bike that has elastometor bump-stop/suspension.  But, woe is you, the elastometer has gone hard and your beautiful plush ride is no more.  You hunt around the net: but a new elastometor is nowhere to be found, what to do, what to do?

Boil it!

Fill a bowl with boiling water (get an adult to help you) and drop the elastometer in for around thirty seconds.  Carefully fish it out, let it dry and hey-presto, it's squishy again.

This isn't a permenant solution, you'll find that after a while it starts to go hard again.  You can, of course, boil it again, but the times between boilings tend to get less and less.  At this point you need to get your whittling knife out and make a new elastometer from one intended for a different bike.

Re: Reader's bodges
« Reply #4 on: April 08, 2008, 11:17:34 AM »
If, like me, you rarely cut steerers on threadless forks, either because you might one day want to fit the fork to another frame, or you suffer from back problems and might need to raise the bars at some point, don't pad the steerer out with spaces, no, instead put two stems on it.  One points up, the other down.  One takes your handlebars, the other takes a sawn off bar.  Thus you can fit loads of bar furniture: computer, lights GPS, bar bag, etc with little trouble, and because they are at different heights the bar bag won't interfer with the lights.

As a used stem can be picked up for peanuts this works out both cheaper and stronger than a space grip.

rogerzilla

  • l33t h4X0r
Re: Reader's bodges
« Reply #5 on: April 09, 2008, 11:59:35 AM »
Here’s oldie but a goodie to start you off. 

Keeping your hub bodies clean.  Why bother with all that agro with the toothbrush between the spokes?  Just put a strap loosely around the hub (an Armstrong L1vestrong wrist band works well) and as the wheel turns the strap will jump about and stop most of the dirt accumulating.

Except you can't get it on there except when building a wheel  ;D

Old-skool CTC types use a little buckled leather saddlebag strap.
Never tell me the odds.

chris n

  • DIRK HOFMAN MOTORHOMES
    • http://www.tencc.co.uk/
Re: Reader's bodges
« Reply #6 on: April 09, 2008, 12:10:15 PM »
Things to do with old inner tubes #1.  Don’t spend your hard earned wedge on Marsas tape, just split the old inner tube open length ways, wind it around your handlebars, secure with a bit of electrical tape and put the normal bar tape on top.   Added comfort at no expense and one less tube on the landfill site.

Matt Chester recommends mouse mats to pad handlebars - cut to fit and wrap tape over the top.

Polar Bear

  • aka Michael
Re: Reader's bodges
« Reply #7 on: April 09, 2008, 12:17:24 PM »
I know an old chap who uses old inner tubes to weatherproof his headsets.  He cuts old ones up so he has six inch lengths.  Then, double wraps them over the top and bottom once a year when he removes the forks for a check and regrease before winter.

Professional McKenzie Friend and Paralegal.          goodem2@gmail.com     07802 709337.

rogerzilla

  • l33t h4X0r
Re: Reader's bodges
« Reply #8 on: April 09, 2008, 02:00:33 PM »
You can boot a ripped tyre with a piece of folded crisp packet; it will stay in place when the tube is inflated.  Don't use a piece of fag packet as it will shred within a few miles - I found this out the hard way (and before anyone asks, I don't smoke; it was just the first thing I found lying about).
Never tell me the odds.

Re: Reader's bodges
« Reply #9 on: April 09, 2008, 10:40:50 PM »
Last Saturday, on a 200 perm, I traced a rattle on the fixie to a loose mudguard bolt, then discovered my multitool didn't have an allen key of the right size for the bolt.  I tightened the bolt as far as I could with Finger Power (tm), then stretched a bit of rubber band between bolt and mudguard stay to serve as an impromptu washer.

No more rattly mudguard misery...

Re: Reader's bodges
« Reply #10 on: April 11, 2008, 08:13:04 AM »
You can boot a ripped tyre with a piece of folded crisp packet; i

or Australian banknotes

rogerzilla

  • l33t h4X0r
Re: Reader's bodges
« Reply #11 on: April 12, 2008, 01:14:16 PM »
24 x 1 3/8" inner tubes fit MTB tyres OK and are much lighter.  Only problem - they're hard to find nowadays, since "junior racers" have died out.
Never tell me the odds.

eck

  • Gonna ride my bike until I get home...
    • Angus Bike Chain CC
Re: Reader's bodges
« Reply #12 on: April 12, 2008, 02:15:23 PM »
You can boot a ripped tyre with a piece of folded crisp packet; i

or Australian banknotes

You can buy a new tyre with Australian banknotes.

If you are in Australia and are near a bike shop.
It's a bit weird, but actually quite wonderful.

rogerzilla

  • l33t h4X0r
Re: Reader's bodges
« Reply #13 on: April 13, 2008, 10:36:48 AM »
Quote
You can buy a new tyre with Australian banknotes.

If you are in Australia and are near a bike shop.

And if GruB hasn't squandered them on ice cream.
Never tell me the odds.

Paul Smith SRCC

  • Surrey Road Cyling Club
  • 37+ years a club rider, 27+ years in cycle trade
    • www.plsmith.co.uk
Re: Reader's bodges
« Reply #14 on: April 13, 2008, 03:55:39 PM »
Here’s a thread for everyone to list their favourite bodges.  What is a bodge?  I like to think of it as a repair or improvement that includes a little lateral thinking and doesn’t require buying an expensive new part from the bike shop.  Reuse, recycle, remanufacture.

1) Many have made mudguard mudflaps, bleach bottles in same colour as the frame to accessorize, handy on the back guard as well as front as it helps keep your friends clean, plus on a bike ridden at night you can put reflective strips on it.

2) Wine or even better still Champagne/Cava corks with a bit of fettling instead of bar end plugs, a good holiday reminder on your tour bike that

3) Quil pedals with the right technique can be used as bottle openers

Paul_Smith
www.bikeplus.co.uk

rogerzilla

  • l33t h4X0r
Re: Reader's bodges
« Reply #15 on: April 13, 2008, 04:13:02 PM »
Conventional QR levers can be used as tyre levers - no need to carry that extra weight.
Never tell me the odds.

Salvatore

  • Джон Спунър
    • Pics
Re: Reader's bodges
« Reply #16 on: April 13, 2008, 06:32:57 PM »
Not sure if this counts as a bodge, and it's not mine.

Brian Mann's homemade pen holder. Keep a pen handy for those Audax info controls.

Quote
et avec John, excellent lecteur de road-book, on s'en est sortis sans erreur

rogerzilla

  • l33t h4X0r
Re: Reader's bodges
« Reply #17 on: April 13, 2008, 08:14:48 PM »
Don't use your low-rider bosses?  With a bit of aluminium tubing as a spacer (B&Q), a few washers and a long M5 bolt, you can put any standard dynamo headlamp on there.  It's a very rigid connection and won't fatigue like those useless steel fork crown brackets...at least, if your fork fatigues you'll have more to worry about that which way your front light is pointing  :o
Never tell me the odds.

Paul Smith SRCC

  • Surrey Road Cyling Club
  • 37+ years a club rider, 27+ years in cycle trade
    • www.plsmith.co.uk
Re: Reader's bodges
« Reply #18 on: April 13, 2008, 09:17:30 PM »
Don't use your low-rider bosses?  With a bit of aluminium tubing as a spacer (B&Q), a few washers and a long M5 bolt, you can put any standard dynamo headlamp on there.  It's a very rigid connection and won't fatigue like those useless steel fork crown brackets...at least, if your fork fatigues you'll have more to worry about that which way your front light is pointing  :o

I have used low rider bosses as a lamp boss for years on the Blue here, works a treat

Paul_Smith
www.bikeplus.co.uk

Re: Reader's bodges
« Reply #19 on: April 13, 2008, 10:06:09 PM »
Don't use your low-rider bosses?  With a bit of aluminium tubing as a spacer (B&Q), a few washers and a long M5 bolt, you can put any standard dynamo headlamp on there.  It's a very rigid connection and won't fatigue like those useless steel fork crown brackets...at least, if your fork fatigues you'll have more to worry about that which way your front light is pointing  :o

The thread on a QR skewer is M5, extend it down and cut it short and have a QR and adjustable lamp.

Re: Reader's bodges
« Reply #20 on: April 13, 2008, 10:07:15 PM »
How is the light throw with the lamp mounted there ? I may consider it for La Chignole next year.

Paul Smith SRCC

  • Surrey Road Cyling Club
  • 37+ years a club rider, 27+ years in cycle trade
    • www.plsmith.co.uk
Re: Reader's bodges
« Reply #21 on: April 14, 2008, 09:16:28 AM »
Don't use your low-rider bosses?  With a bit of aluminium tubing as a spacer (B&Q), a few washers and a long M5 bolt, you can put any standard dynamo headlamp on there.  It's a very rigid connection and won't fatigue like those useless steel fork crown brackets...at least, if your fork fatigues you'll have more to worry about that which way your front light is pointing  :o
The thread on a QR skewer is M5, extend it down and cut it short and have a QR and adjustable lamp.

I use the thread on a QR skewer as well



Paul_Smith
www.bikeplus.co.uk

rogerzilla

  • l33t h4X0r
Re: Reader's bodges
« Reply #22 on: April 14, 2008, 09:43:09 AM »
The light throw is better than usual, because you can have a long bright patch on the road without having the lamp pointing downwards too much - so it's also more visible to oncoming traffic.

The tyre doesn't really cast an annoying shadow if your lamp has a tight beam (like the Schmidt E6 - I haven't tried the Supernova E3 down there yet), but Tony Oliver used to mount his on the left side of the fork to avoid this.  If you mount your only headlamp on the left, bear in mind that it's technically illegal under UK law and the lamp will be hidden from oncoming traffic, albeit only just before they pass you.

A refinement to this tip is to use V-brake dished/domed washer pairs either side of the lamp for incredibly precise aiming.
Never tell me the odds.

Re: Reader's bodges
« Reply #23 on: April 14, 2008, 10:02:14 AM »
The lamp  I would use is not my E6 but one of my Sigma Ellipsoids which I have modified to operate from my dynamo hub and have a switch. These lamps use a 2.4 or 3.0 watt halogen and have a good reflector and lens. They illuminate the full width of the road about 3m ahead and throw light immediately in front with enough power to illuminate reflective signs at the distance one wants to see them. I suppose I should try it lower down. The fork blade is an ideal out of the way place for a lamp and easy to mount with a bolt and spacers.

Re: Reader's bodges
« Reply #24 on: April 14, 2008, 10:34:29 AM »
Bent your rear mech. hanger?

The rear axle thread is the same size as the derailleur fixing bolt. Remove the derailleur, screw the end of your axle in it's place, and use the wheel as a lever to bent the hanger straight.  :thumbsup:
Life is too important to be taken seriously.