Author Topic: Roadkill Pheasant - How To Cook?  (Read 2660 times)

Roadkill Pheasant - How To Cook?
« on: September 22, 2008, 10:42:40 PM »
Came across a nice fresh-smelling (male) pheasant today on my way home across the Wiltshire countryside.

The problem is, how to cook it.  Where I am until Thursday there's no oven, so any cooking would have to be some kind of casserole or stew.  But I'm returning to my other home with an oven on Thursday, so cooking there could involve roasting, grilling etc.

What does the panel think I should do? And do you think I should employ a pheasant plucker?

spesh

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Re: Roadkill Pheasant - How To Cook?
« Reply #1 on: September 22, 2008, 10:56:41 PM »
Pheasant's a bit dry, so joint it, marinate in garlic, herbs and red wine for a day or two and then casserole it.

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andygates

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Re: Roadkill Pheasant - How To Cook?
« Reply #2 on: September 22, 2008, 11:11:04 PM »
Pluck 'n' gut it, wash it well, then find somewhere cool to hang it until Thursday.  Or chop it into portions and casserole as is your whim - do it long and low so it gets all fally-aparty.
It takes blood and guts to be this cool but I'm still just a cliché.
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Re: Roadkill Pheasant - How To Cook?
« Reply #3 on: September 23, 2008, 10:50:48 AM »
A lot of people round here don't bother plucking pheasant. They skin it instead. This works fine if you just want the breasts to pan fry or you plan on making a casserole. It tends to waste some of the meat though and you cant really roast it. If you have a good supply of cheap pheasant skinning is good. If you are buying them at a mark-up from a city butcher its not such a hot idea.
I think you'll find it's a bit more complicated than that.

Re: Roadkill Pheasant - How To Cook?
« Reply #4 on: September 23, 2008, 02:10:51 PM »
Thanks for the suggestions.  I found a website explaining how to pluck and draw a pheasant,  which was helpful.  It's now sitting in the fridge, waiting to be transported on Thursday, and I'll let you know what we do with it in the end.  Nice plump bird, but I have no idea whether the males are tougher than the females.

onb

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Re: Roadkill Pheasant - How To Cook?
« Reply #5 on: September 23, 2008, 02:14:41 PM »
Thanks for the suggestions.  I found a website explaining how to pluck and draw a pheasant,  which was helpful.  It's now sitting in the fridge, waiting to be transported on Thursday, and I'll let you know what we do with it in the end.  Nice plump bird, but I have no idea whether the males are tougher than the females.


I believe that is the case,probably cause for casserolling.
Permanenetly disatisfied .

Re: Roadkill Pheasant - How To Cook?
« Reply #6 on: September 23, 2008, 02:31:41 PM »
Caserole it or if you do want tp roast a pheasant you need to add fat to stop it drying out. Cover it with strips of streaky bacon for example.
I think you'll find it's a bit more complicated than that.

Re: Roadkill Pheasant - How To Cook?
« Reply #7 on: September 23, 2008, 03:31:43 PM »
Thanks for the suggestions.  I found a website explaining how to pluck and draw a pheasant,  which was helpful.  It's now sitting in the fridge, waiting to be transported on Thursday, and I'll let you know what we do with it in the end.  Nice plump bird, but I have no idea whether the males are tougher than the females.

Cock birds are no tougher than hen birds - it's age that matters. If your cock bird has small, waxy spurs on the back of it's legs then it's probably young; if the spurs are older looking then the bird is older.

By the way, it is against the law to pick up a bird you have knocked down, but quite legal if someone else knocked it down.

Re: Roadkill Pheasant - How To Cook?
« Reply #8 on: September 23, 2008, 09:20:21 PM »
By the way, it is against the law to pick up a bird you have knocked down, but quite legal if someone else knocked it down.

Yes, that's true, so you kill em and I'll bag em. ;D

I sometimes see roadkill and have thought about using it as dinner.
Is there anything I should avoid in rabbits and pheasants?
I have a youtube on gutting a rabbit. Just need to catch a bugger now!
But pheasants. Yes, they sound good and will be very common soon. Shame to leave all that fresh meat lying in the road.

Any tips on preparing and cooking roadkill?
I have heard that plucking a pheasant is easier when it's still warm.
I also heard that they are best cooked in a pressure cooker because they are pretty tough.
Haven't got round to having a go myself yet, but I have the inclination. My main worry is poisoning myself.

And what do you do with all the feathers and guts?

Re: Roadkill Pheasant - How To Cook?
« Reply #9 on: September 23, 2008, 09:28:02 PM »
"And what do you do with all the feathers and guts?"

Insert said pheasant into rear wheel of bike and descend steep hill as fast as your legs can rotate - min 180rpm. the rotational force will shred the feathers and will spew the guts and offal out of the carcass leaving you with a nicely plucked and gutted carcass.  Cut that in half and stuff each section under your road jersey. Find the next steep hill and climb several times at full speed and max rpm.  Your body heat will slowly cook the flesh. By the time is cooked you are also ready to eat it. 

Also has the side benefit of adding distance to your mileater diary

Regulator

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Re: Roadkill Pheasant - How To Cook?
« Reply #10 on: September 25, 2008, 03:16:37 PM »
"And what do you do with all the feathers and guts?"

Insert said pheasant into rear wheel of bike and descend steep hill as fast as your legs can rotate - min 180rpm. the rotational force will shred the feathers and will spew the guts and offal out of the carcass leaving you with a nicely plucked and gutted carcass.  Cut that in half and stuff each section under your road jersey. Find the next steep hill and climb several times at full speed and max rpm.  Your body heat will slowly cook the flesh. By the time is cooked you are also ready to eat it. 

Also has the side benefit of adding distance to your mileater diary


With your avatar, this a particularly odd and somewhat chilling posting....

Does the parrot know of your views?



 ;D
Quote from: clarion
I completely agree with Reg.

Re: Roadkill Pheasant - How To Cook?
« Reply #11 on: September 25, 2008, 03:28:56 PM »
Old acquaintances of mine, huntin' and shootin' types, would never consider eating fresh pheasant. It had to hang for at least two weeks. When the head just comes away in your hand it's ready to cook.

Re: Roadkill Pheasant - How To Cook?
« Reply #12 on: September 25, 2008, 10:23:08 PM »
Quote
With your avatar, this a particularly odd and somewhat chilling posting....

Does the parrot know of your views?

Chilling indeed. 

I enjoyed its liver with a nice chianti  :demon:

Re: Roadkill Pheasant - How To Cook?
« Reply #13 on: September 26, 2008, 01:57:57 PM »
Thanks for the suggestions, everyone.  Casseroled it - 'twas luverly! :)