Author Topic: What is pooing in my garden?  (Read 839 times)

What is pooing in my garden?
« on: May 19, 2017, 04:31:41 pm »
Anyone recognise what this Scat belongs to?

'Absence of evidence is not evidence of absence'.

Martin John Rees.

Re: What is pooing in my garden
« Reply #1 on: May 19, 2017, 04:34:12 pm »
Whatever it is, it doesn't look well!
"No matter how slow you go, you're still lapping everybody on the couch."

What is pooing in my garden?
« Reply #2 on: May 19, 2017, 08:06:24 pm »
Its actually a type of algae. Specific botanical name? I'll have to look it up. A type of cyanobacterium.

Re: What is pooing in my garden?
« Reply #3 on: May 19, 2017, 10:40:09 pm »
mmmmm.....
'Absence of evidence is not evidence of absence'.

Martin John Rees.

Vince

  • Can't climb; won't climb
Re: What is pooing in my garden?
« Reply #4 on: May 19, 2017, 11:00:46 pm »
216km from Marsh Gibbon

Re: What is pooing in my garden?
« Reply #5 on: May 20, 2017, 11:54:37 am »
Triffid?
'Absence of evidence is not evidence of absence'.

Martin John Rees.

Re: What is pooing in my garden?
« Reply #6 on: May 20, 2017, 02:38:32 pm »
Its actually a type of algae. Specific botanical name? I'll have to look it up. A type of cyanobacterium.

Found it. Nostock commune. Thanks for that.
'Absence of evidence is not evidence of absence'.

Martin John Rees.

Re: What is pooing in my garden?
« Reply #7 on: May 20, 2017, 03:03:10 pm »
My pleasure. Would you like the soup recipe? The one with Stilton. You know.

Re: What is pooing in my garden?
« Reply #8 on: May 20, 2017, 03:04:43 pm »
Think I will let the Phillipines/China carry on as they are tvm.
'Absence of evidence is not evidence of absence'.

Martin John Rees.

David Martin

  • Thats Dr Oi You thankyouverymuch
Re: What is pooing in my garden?
« Reply #9 on: May 20, 2017, 07:32:28 pm »
Found some in my garden too.
"By creating we think. By living we learn" - Patrick Geddes

Re: What is pooing in my garden?
« Reply #10 on: May 20, 2017, 11:57:04 pm »
It seems to thrive on areas previously treated with Glyphosphate and gravel/limestone. Possibly due to phosphate take up. (any chemists/biologists have a view?) It is also as old as time and has the same/similar optical light sensors we have at the back of our eyeballs. It is resistant to heat and cold and is very difficult to get rid of. Sigh. Re posts above it is apparently edible. full of protein and possibly has health benefits including anti inflammatory effects, yuck. Washing soda is alleged to be effective after repeated applications, covering in plastic sheet or dosing with salt. Moss/Algea killer available in other countries works but I am not sure that this is available or permitted within EU  area.

At least I now know that there is not some strange beast active in my garden at night.
'Absence of evidence is not evidence of absence'.

Martin John Rees.

Re: What is pooing in my garden?
« Reply #11 on: May 21, 2017, 07:43:26 am »
It doesn't grow when it is dry. Yesterday was the last rain for a while. Save your pennies.

Andrij

  • Андрій
  • Ερασιτεχνικός μισάνθρωπος
Re: What is pooing in my garden?
« Reply #12 on: May 21, 2017, 07:54:27 pm »
Nuke it from orbit, it's the only way to be sure.

I guess FIRE would do in a pinch.
;D  Andrij.  I pronounce you Complete and Utter GIT   :thumbsup:

ian

  • fatuously disingenuous
    • The Suburban Survival Guide
Re: What is pooing in my garden?
« Reply #13 on: July 30, 2017, 06:50:52 pm »
It seems to thrive on areas previously treated with Glyphosphate and gravel/limestone. Possibly due to phosphate take up. (any chemists/biologists have a view?) It is also as old as time and has the same/similar optical light sensors we have at the back of our eyeballs. It is resistant to heat and cold and is very difficult to get rid of. Sigh. Re posts above it is apparently edible. full of protein and possibly has health benefits including anti inflammatory effects, yuck. Washing soda is alleged to be effective after repeated applications, covering in plastic sheet or dosing with salt. Moss/Algea killer available in other countries works but I am not sure that this is available or permitted within EU  area.

At least I now know that there is not some strange beast active in my garden at night.

It's glyphosate, not glyphosphate, which is just a proprietary name, no phosphate involved (it's N-(phosphonomethyl)glycine either as a free acid, or an amine salt, fact fans). It can offer a significant source of phosphorus to anything it doesn't kill.

Nostoc is an extremophilic, colony forming cyanobacteria (not really an algae). They're ubiquitous. When you clear any ground of vegetation with a broad-spectrum herbicide you create nice opportunities for anything with resistance and, as mentioned, glyphosate is a good source of vital phosphorus. It'll dry out and 'disappear' if not wet and indeed, some people eat them, though I'd skip it unless it was a choice of that or KFC. They're good for soil as they fix nitrogen. Just scoop it up and throw it away, trying to kill it is not worth the effort given it's everywhere.

Very common on gravel driveways etc, as the surface area forms a nice substrate for the colonies.
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