Author Topic: Quadcopters for camera use  (Read 13360 times)

Kim

  • An appetite for the epic, but no real stamina
Re: Quadcopters for camera use
« Reply #150 on: July 25, 2017, 05:57:43 pm »
I wonder what the alternative is?  Possibly large slow rotors, to reduce the frequency of the noise, which may help with mammals and animals that hear in a similar audio range ?

Isn't that a helicopter? :)


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How about, very small, very high speed rotors, to move the frequencies so high, that they're way above the range of the target animals? ???

In my experience, many animals can be surprisingly un-bothered by such things.  They fear their natural predators, which usually includes man, but machines don't really register as a threat unless they get *very* close.  Hence you can drive up to a pride of lions in a vehicle (rattly old smoke-smoke-spewing diesel engine and all) and they'll just sit there watching you, but if they see a human approaching on foot they'll go into fight or flight mode.

Wildlife photographers have had a lot of success with remotely controlled electric ground vehicles.  I don't think the animals usually believe it's a rock or a particularly stupid penguin or whatever, it's just not a threat, food or a mate.
I do find anything involving ball bearings oddly satisfying

Re: Quadcopters for camera use
« Reply #151 on: July 25, 2017, 09:36:09 pm »
In my experience, many animals can be surprisingly un-bothered by such things.  They fear their natural predators, which usually includes man, but machines don't really register as a threat unless they get *very* close. 

Can you come round and explain this to Tayo (Border Collie x Retriever) please?  He goes bonkers whenever he sees anything RC being used when out on his walks.   Quadcopters & RC cars both get the full-on "postman" treatment.  He's never hurt anyone (or drone) yet, but you wouldn't know it from the volume and ferocity of the barking.

Re: Quadcopters for camera use
« Reply #152 on: July 25, 2017, 09:40:14 pm »
I may indulge.

Currently weighing up DJI Spark vs Mavic. Similar portability, the Mavic Pro has it on the whole 4K thing, but you can recharge the Spark using a Power Bank. I'm trying to work out which is best for carrying on a bike to the beach/hills/audax control.

Kim

  • An appetite for the epic, but no real stamina
Re: Quadcopters for camera use
« Reply #153 on: July 25, 2017, 09:48:31 pm »
In my experience, many animals can be surprisingly un-bothered by such things.  They fear their natural predators, which usually includes man, but machines don't really register as a threat unless they get *very* close. 

Can you come round and explain this to Tayo (Border Collie x Retriever) please?  He goes bonkers whenever he sees anything RC being used when out on his walks.   Quadcopters & RC cars both get the full-on "postman" treatment.  He's never hurt anyone (or drone) yet, but you wouldn't know it from the volume and ferocity of the barking.

Border collies, innit.  Going bonkers is what they do best.
I do find anything involving ball bearings oddly satisfying

Re: Quadcopters for camera use
« Reply #154 on: August 17, 2017, 09:19:48 pm »
I wonder what the alternative is?  Possibly large slow rotors, to reduce the frequency of the noise, which may help with mammals and animals that hear in a similar audio range ?

Isn't that a helicopter? :)


Funny you should say that. My dog will try to chase my quads and planes, but mostly ignores my helicopter.. Currently setting one up with the same flight controller as a regular 'drone'.

Re: Quadcopters for camera use
« Reply #155 on: December 08, 2017, 11:44:27 am »
Anyone looked into the potential of a business from drone photography? Needs (?) a commercial license I think, although it isn't entirely clear what the status of that license is, and a decent drone, but the potential is pretty big I would have thought. I can see a problem in London as much is a no fly zone.

Re: Quadcopters for camera use
« Reply #156 on: December 08, 2017, 11:47:42 am »
Anyone looked into the potential of a business from drone photography? Needs (?) a commercial license I think, although it isn't entirely clear what the status of that license is, and a decent drone, but the potential is pretty big I would have thought. I can see a problem in London as much is a no fly zone.

I have a contact who uses a drone fitted with thermography kit to survey for hot spots on solar pv installations, check wind turbines etc.  Mind you, he is also an expert in renewables.  He has both a standard and some sort of advanced operator's license which allows closer inspection in built up areas, like 20m instead of 50m.

Re: Quadcopters for camera use
« Reply #157 on: December 08, 2017, 04:23:56 pm »
Anyone looked into the potential of a business from drone photography? Needs (?) a commercial license I think, although it isn't entirely clear what the status of that license is, and a decent drone, but the potential is pretty big I would have thought. I can see a problem in London as much is a no fly zone.

You need a licence, some training, and a number of hoops jumped through.

See here:

https://www.caa.co.uk/Commercial-industry/Aircraft/Unmanned-aircraft/Small-drones/Regulations-relating-to-the-commercial-use-of-small-drones/

Re: Quadcopters for camera use
« Reply #158 on: December 08, 2017, 04:39:23 pm »
Surely you should fly through the hoops.
Miles cycled 2014 = 3551.5 (Target 7300 :()
Miles cycled 2013 = 6141.4
Miles cycled 2012 = 4038.1

Re: Quadcopters for camera use
« Reply #159 on: December 10, 2017, 10:11:52 am »
It does sound as if there should be a real business possible somewhere, a lot of the license training sites have "info" but real life experience I reckon would count for a lot more.

Curiously, while I think I am in a "no fly" zone, that includes an area where model aircraft flying is permitted. I suspect one could fly a drone from there.

Re: Quadcopters for camera use
« Reply #160 on: December 11, 2017, 10:18:30 pm »
The aerial photography market is most likely over saturated and you'll probably need to more specialist things in order to make it worthwhile.