Author Topic: Cycling glasses  (Read 1107 times)

FifeingEejit

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Cycling glasses
« on: 09 September, 2021, 02:06:51 am »
So far I've dodged prescription cycling glasses, but i noticed the change in my prescription that was confirmed today   while cycling, far sighted (1.5 and 2), bilateral stigmatisms and bilateral coloboma.

Given my liking for riding at night and my liking for trying to avoid spending money I don't need to. It comes to my consideration  that what I want is changeable lenses so I only need 1 set of frames for day and night  riding and that would also to me mean inserts so I don't have to pay for 2 sets of lenses to be milled.
I think I prefer shield style to distinct lenses too.
I had a look earlier and I seem to be able to find stuff that meet 2/3rd if that but not all 3, I thought I'd found a model that would meet all three but the plano lens spec was shite in that the sun lenses were just tinted, no polarizarion or anything and they did brown and clear rather than reddish and yellow.

Anyone got any suggestions to look at?
Rudy project looked promising but can't find anyone selling more than a couple of their options.

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Re: Cycling glasses
« Reply #1 on: 09 September, 2021, 06:05:24 am »
I'm a happy user of Optilabs cycling glasses, with photochromic lenses. I use them for day and night riding, so you don't even need to change anything or spend money on two sets of glasses. And my prescription is much worse than yours.

Beware of shield style cycling glasses. They come with very very small prescription inserts that seriously restricts your lateral vision, in my opinion.  Distinct lenses come with... real full size lenses!

A

Re: Cycling glasses
« Reply #2 on: 09 September, 2021, 09:43:43 am »
I use Optilabs transitions ones as well. They aren't quite as good as the Oakley Flak Jackets that were stolen from my car, but they were about a third of the price!
Definitely try before you buy - I found my eyelashes brushed on the inserts when I tried a set of them!

FifeingEejit

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Re: Cycling glasses
« Reply #3 on: 09 September, 2021, 11:46:37 am »
How clear do they go? Previous non-rx transition sunglasses I had for hiking never really went clear and I didn't like them for cycling at night.

I'm also not sure about going back to clear at night from yellow. And not just because it makes every vehicle look French.

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fruitcake

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    • Bailey
Re: Cycling glasses
« Reply #4 on: 09 September, 2021, 12:18:17 pm »
Watching this thread with interest.

I've previously owned two pairs of specs with the same steel rimmed frame because ICBA to choose another design. One pair had normal lenses, the other had Reactolite self-tinting) lenses. When one of the frames broke, I swapped the normal lenses to the other frame and now have the option to switch lenses, which is an unexpected benefit.

These were the more expensive lenses from Specsavers, so in effect mid-priced specs. I think I paid c£300 for two pairs. They've lasted more than ten years, so that's £30 a year.

My regret is that I chose very small frames that in effect restrict my choice of bike. (My specs mean that road bikes with longish top tubes are unccomfortable.) Next time I'll choose larger frames that sit a bit higher so I get more in-focus 'peripheral' vision.

Re: Cycling glasses
« Reply #5 on: 09 September, 2021, 12:21:05 pm »
How clear do they go?

If you put the glasses against a white surface, you can see they are not 100% clear, but they are clear enough for night riding, at least for me!

I'm also not sure about going back to clear at night from yellow. And not just because it makes every vehicle look French.

Ahem! It's been over 25 years now since yellow headlights were dropped! Only historic cars have them now.

FifeingEejit

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Re: Cycling glasses
« Reply #6 on: 09 September, 2021, 01:26:29 pm »
True but selectif yellow still means "French" to me!

Unfortunately my prescription changes every 3/4 years, up until this one it's been a new pair of glasses every other visit (every 2 years but the delay... ) which is a reason for liking the idea of the prescription being separate from frames.



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cygnet

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Re: Cycling glasses
« Reply #7 on: 09 September, 2021, 02:08:14 pm »
I have previously bought rudy project with clip-ins from eyekit.co.uk - there's quite a range, of all sorts of brands
I've now moved on to some more shield-like glasses from Ekoi - albeit without using an insert currently (though I have the insert piece, so could take that to an optician)
Both have photochromatic lens range 0-3 and I find them fine for riding at night - but they could be swapped out.
The ekoi ones are narrower/less adjustable but I prefer the amount of coverage provided by the lens
Reasonably Inconsiderate

FifeingEejit

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Re: Cycling glasses
« Reply #8 on: 15 September, 2021, 09:46:57 pm »
Still fretting over this, chances are I still will be doing so and struggling to read road signs at distance while cycling by the time my next prescription change comes in 2023

Re: Cycling glasses
« Reply #9 on: 15 September, 2021, 10:12:41 pm »
I used opilabs polarised which transition to clear as well for audax. The lenses are a bit fogged now. After 9 years use. I’m just using my backup prescription glasses for now. I’ve tried inserts and just found small lenses as above and they easily fog up.

Just found they do lens replacement. https://www.optilabs.com/reglazing/. Ought to get that done with latest prescription  as the frames and setup otherwise is great.

Re: Cycling glasses
« Reply #10 on: 15 September, 2021, 11:09:30 pm »
Is your vision OK beyond GPS-on-the-bars distance? The budget option I use:

https://www.merlincycles.com/bbb-bsg-59ph-impress-reader-photochromic-glasses-112438.html

These are bifocals with a small reading glasses section. I had always intended to get a better quality option, but I found that I needed them or used them so rarely that I have never felt the need. Most of my riding is on roads I know, and I don’t need to read my GPS, so normally just use my now-ageing photochromic polarised Rudy Projects, which go clear.

Short version: before laying out what has the potential to be quite a lot of money, think about just how often you would really need to use them.


FifeingEejit

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Re: Cycling glasses
« Reply #11 on: 15 September, 2021, 11:32:25 pm »
Think the astigmatism is more of the problem than the diopter.

Right eye is currently +1.5 sphere, - 1.5 cylinder and 55 axis
The left eye is currently +2.0, -1.25 and 112

They keep changing annoyingly, and the result now is I can't read signs and number plates if I've been squinting and straining on the GPS.

And yes, spunkin 300+ quid at cycling glasses every couple of years at the same time as 250+ on driving and all day glasses is sore... At least my eyes aren't as bad as my dad's were before he got his cataracts done, 700 quid a pair for varifocals

I've tried putting my non prescription cycling glasses over my current glasses but unlike with the cheap shit car sunglasses I have the two don't want to co-exist on my nose.



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hellymedic

  • Just do it!
Re: Cycling glasses
« Reply #12 on: 15 September, 2021, 11:59:48 pm »
At the time my astigmatism was changing rapidly, I bought spectacles with circular plastic frames and repositioned the lenses to suit.
The degree of astigmatism didn't change as much as the axis...

FifeingEejit

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Re: Cycling glasses
« Reply #13 on: 16 September, 2021, 12:07:42 am »
Never thought of that (ok ok I've never taken this much interest in what my prescription means before)

If I had kept my prescription history I'd know if this would work or not!

Annoyingly it doesn't have pupil distance on it to i also need to get I front of a mirror with digital calipers...


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hellymedic

  • Just do it!
Re: Cycling glasses
« Reply #14 on: 16 September, 2021, 01:43:48 am »
Rotating the lenses will mean the optical centre shifts a bit, which is suboptimal but tolerable.

You can probably read your interpupillary distance from the scale on any binocular equipment you use.

fruitcake

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    • Bailey
Re: Cycling glasses
« Reply #15 on: 16 September, 2021, 11:16:46 am »
The dispensing optician 'measures' my interpupillary distance when I've chosen frames. This involves a marker pen.  :-\ She asks me to look straight at her and then she marks a dot in line with one of my pupils on the blank glass in the frame. Then she does the other one. That's what determines the optical centres of the lenses. I think that's the only time it's measured.

hellymedic

  • Just do it!
Re: Cycling glasses
« Reply #16 on: 16 September, 2021, 02:39:47 pm »
The dispensing optician 'measures' my interpupillary distance when I've chosen frames. This involves a marker pen. She asks me to look at straight her and then she marks a dot in line with one of my pupils on the blank glass in the frame. Then she does the other one. That's what determines the optical centres of the lenses. I think that's the only time it's measured.

My optometrist's receptionist does the same; it's hardly an exact science.

There's usually a handy scale on the 'bridge' of binocular microscopes, field glasses or telescope eyepieces, which will do the job.

FifeingEejit

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Re: Cycling glasses
« Reply #17 on: 16 September, 2021, 02:41:52 pm »
My opticians have always used what I'd best describe as a set of plastic ruller based calipers.

The only problem with the binocular approach is that I don't have any.

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