Author Topic: LFT's for other bugs  (Read 670 times)

quixoticgeek

  • Mostly Harmless
LFT's for other bugs
« on: 26 September, 2021, 10:36:11 pm »

LFT's for the current plague are pretty much ubiquitous now. Which got me thinking, do they exist for other common illnesses. Like flu ?

J
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Kim

  • Timelord
Re: LFT's for other bugs
« Reply #1 on: 26 September, 2021, 11:15:16 pm »
I believe the lateral flow principle forms the basis of all sorts of laboratory assays, including identifying diseases. Often these use low levels of fluorescence and electronic sensors, rather than something that can be seen by the naked eye.

The one we're most familiar with is the hCG pregnancy test...

quixoticgeek

  • Mostly Harmless
Re: LFT's for other bugs
« Reply #2 on: 26 September, 2021, 11:16:43 pm »
I believe the lateral flow principle forms the basis of all sorts of laboratory assays, including identifying diseases. Often these use low levels of fluorescence and electronic sensors, rather than something that can be seen by the naked eye.

The one we're most familiar with is the hCG pregnancy test...

That's a parasite... not an infection :p

J
--
Beer, bikes, and backpacking
http://b.42q.eu/

ian

  • camera nazi
Re: LFT's for other bugs
« Reply #3 on: 27 September, 2021, 09:58:43 am »
Yes, they are. Techniques like Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assays (ELISA) are very common, the LFT is just a 'consumer' variant that can be read by eye. They're used for all kinds of things (from drugs test, environmental pollutants to Ebola). They've traditionally not been used so much in clinical contexts though, mostly due to the regulatory burden of debuting a clinical test (it's cheaper and easier to do it in a lab).
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Regulator

  • That's Councillor Regulator to you...
Re: LFT's for other bugs
« Reply #4 on: 27 September, 2021, 10:54:50 am »

LFT's for the current plague are pretty much ubiquitous now. Which got me thinking, do they exist for other common illnesses. Like flu ?

J


There are a range of LFTs out there.  As Kim says, the most ubiquitous one is the pregnancy test (developed by Paul Davis in the 1980s).   

Paul Davis co-founded Mologic in the early 2000s.  Mologic has developed a range of LFTs, including for monitoring HIV.  It's focus is on developing countries and it has recently been taken over by George Soros' Economic Development Fund and the Gates Foundation (cue all sorts of right wing conspiracy theories).
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ian

  • camera nazi
Re: LFT's for other bugs
« Reply #5 on: 27 September, 2021, 11:04:23 am »
They've come into their own in places where clinical labs are uncommon or nonexistent (hence the use for diagnosing Ebola and HIV in Africa).
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IanDG

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Re: LFT's for other bugs
« Reply #6 on: 03 November, 2021, 05:12:00 pm »
When I were in a lab we used them for malaria, RSV and c-diff