Author Topic: Touring Bikes?  (Read 9578 times)

Oscar's dad

  • aka Septimus Fitzwilliam Beauregard Partridge
Re: Touring Bikes?
« Reply #50 on: 07 January, 2022, 11:10:37 am »
:thumbsup: Nice set up... I am looking forward to this trip now... Thanks for sharing OD...

 :thumbsup:

Re: Touring Bikes?
« Reply #51 on: 07 January, 2022, 12:25:07 pm »
OD remind me what commission did Surly have you on?

Oscar's dad

  • aka Septimus Fitzwilliam Beauregard Partridge
Re: Touring Bikes?
« Reply #52 on: 07 January, 2022, 12:36:42 pm »
OD remind me what commission did Surly have you on?

0% regrettably!

Karla

  • car(e) free
    • Lost Byway - around the world by bike
Re: Touring Bikes?
« Reply #53 on: 07 January, 2022, 03:28:26 pm »
Och, just when ye think ye have the bike all sorted, up pops this wee beastie... Very braw indeed!

Tbh if you're thinking of heavily loaded touring potentially on dirt roads, I'd go discs.  Your rims are bound to take a beating and a buckled rim won't kill your braking on a disc bike.[/list]

Re: Touring Bikes?
« Reply #54 on: 07 January, 2022, 03:51:28 pm »
Tubus Tara, OD?  I can't get mine level on the LHT, either.  The fork bosses are in the wrong place or Tubus have put the mounting slot too far forwards on the rack struts.  You'd think there would be a Blackburn low-rider standard they could follow.
Through the angel rain, through the dust and the gasoline, through the cruelty of strangers, to the neon dream

Oscar's dad

  • aka Septimus Fitzwilliam Beauregard Partridge
Re: Touring Bikes?
« Reply #55 on: 07 January, 2022, 03:55:58 pm »
Tubus Tara, OD?  I can't get mine level on the LHT, either...

Yes I think so, it's annoying you can't them level.

Re: Touring Bikes?
« Reply #56 on: 07 January, 2022, 04:08:08 pm »
OD what is that Ortlieb? bag you have mounted laterally at the tail end?
Get a bicycle. You will never regret it, if you live- Mark Twain

Oscar's dad

  • aka Septimus Fitzwilliam Beauregard Partridge
Re: Touring Bikes?
« Reply #57 on: 07 January, 2022, 04:14:54 pm »
OD what is that Ortlieb? bag you have mounted laterally at the tail end?

On the back, sitting on the rack top is a Carradice, my tent in a bag and a folding stool. The photo was taken back in 2015 just after I'd finished building the bike and I was seeing how much weight it would carry and what it felt like to ride.  Conclusion: a lot and lovely  :thumbsup:

Re: Touring Bikes?
« Reply #58 on: 07 January, 2022, 04:27:33 pm »
When you load up a touring bike, the 22T chainring gets dirty for the first time!
Through the angel rain, through the dust and the gasoline, through the cruelty of strangers, to the neon dream

Oscar's dad

  • aka Septimus Fitzwilliam Beauregard Partridge
Re: Touring Bikes?
« Reply #59 on: 07 January, 2022, 04:29:14 pm »
When you load up a touring bike, the 22T chainring gets dirty for the first time!

 :thumbsup:

Re: Touring Bikes?
« Reply #60 on: 07 January, 2022, 04:55:27 pm »
If you get seduced by the LHT lobby, be aware the current disc model is considerably different from those being discussed here, it may or may not suit you, but considering the current model on the basis of reviews of the previous might be a mistake.
I have three touring bikes, not just because I'm greedy, there's also more than one type of tour and the bikes are considerably different. You can't really go wrong, buy something designed as a touring bike and it'll be fine to go touring on, many bikes not designed for it are also fine.  If you do have a better idea of what you like and what you want to do with it, the chances are you'll get a better bike, you might just get lucky or it might take a few bikes to get there.

Oscar's dad

  • aka Septimus Fitzwilliam Beauregard Partridge
Re: Touring Bikes?
« Reply #61 on: 07 January, 2022, 05:04:51 pm »
If you get seduced by the LHT lobby, be aware the current disc model is considerably different from those being discussed here, it may or may not suit you, but considering the current model on the basis of reviews of the previous might be a mistake.
I have three touring bikes, not just because I'm greedy, there's also more than one type of tour and the bikes are considerably different. You can't really go wrong, buy something designed as a touring bike and it'll be fine to go touring on, many bikes not designed for it are also fine.  If you do have a better idea of what you like and what you want to do with it, the chances are you'll get a better bike, you might just get lucky or it might take a few bikes to get there.

Very good points ^^^

ElyDave

  • Royal and Ancient Polar Bear Society member 263583
Re: Touring Bikes?
« Reply #62 on: 07 January, 2022, 06:03:45 pm »
Very true, of the bikes I have  now, two are 17 yo Al frame carbon fork road bike with triple, and >20 years old 26" wheel MTB with rigid frame. Since buying those I've bought and sold a full carbon road bike and a 29'er with front suspension. Both were fast, but just not as enjoyable or comfortable for the rides I do.
“Procrastination is the thief of time, collar him.” –Charles Dickens

IanDG

  • The p*** artist formerly known as 'Windy'
    • the_dandg_rouleur
Re: Touring Bikes?
« Reply #63 on: 07 January, 2022, 06:09:21 pm »
Tubus Tara, OD?  I can't get mine level on the LHT, either.  The fork bosses are in the wrong place or Tubus have put the mounting slot too far forwards on the rack struts.  You'd think there would be a Blackburn low-rider standard they could follow.

Aah, thanks for that - I've bought Tara for when I finally get round to my first camping trip. Won't be pulling my hair out thinking I'm doing something wrong and spend hours trying to get it level  ;D

Wallace

  • Aye!
Re: Touring Bikes?
« Reply #64 on: 07 January, 2022, 08:40:49 pm »
Cheers all, very helpful… Wallace…

quixoticgeek

  • Mostly Harmless
Re: Touring Bikes?
« Reply #65 on: 08 January, 2022, 12:54:08 pm »


Just a quick word re building your own.

The bike industry supply chain is really screwed up at the moment. I just tried to buy some shifters and was getting 32+ week ETA's for when they will have stock. You may find that your choice of components are not the ones you want, but simply the ones you can get hold of.

J
--
Beer, bikes, and backpacking
http://b.42q.eu/

Re: Touring Bikes?
« Reply #66 on: 14 January, 2022, 11:02:21 am »
What Quixotic said.

I came here to say something similar. The problem isn't just availability, but cost. I've just bought chainset, chain, cassette and jockey wheels = £180

It is really important to have gears low enough for you (when touring), and many bikes are sold with a stupid 50/34 setup. Thankfully the gravel market is changing that. The old touring standard of a good-sized big ring and a twiddly grannie ring has returned after a couple of decades.

So buying a complete bike will probably be cheaper than building one up.

If I were setting up a bike for extended touring, I'd probably plump for either down tube or bar end shifters (that can be operated in friction mode). Easier to get replacement gear bits on the road if something like a cassette or derailleur breaks.
<i>Marmite slave</i>

Oscar's dad

  • aka Septimus Fitzwilliam Beauregard Partridge
Re: Touring Bikes?
« Reply #67 on: 14 January, 2022, 11:45:10 am »
If I were setting up a bike for extended touring, I'd probably plump for either down tube or bar end shifters (that can be operated in friction mode). Easier to get replacement gear bits on the road if something like a cassette or derailleur breaks.

Agree!  :thumbsup: 

Fred is 100% friction so front and back derailleurs can be trimmed to cope with massive gear ranges.

Kim

  • Timelord
Re: Touring Bikes?
« Reply #68 on: 14 January, 2022, 02:34:15 pm »
If I were setting up a bike for extended touring, I'd probably plump for either down tube or bar end shifters (that can be operated in friction mode). Easier to get replacement gear bits on the road if something like a cassette or derailleur breaks.

I got pissed off with the Dura-Ace bar end shifters being ridiculously fragile - there's a plastic friction ring that cracks easily if the lever is subject to significant sideways force (eg. from the bike falling over or bouncing against it on a train), at which point neither indexed nor friction shifting works.  For the last few years I've been using the Microshift alternative, which seems much more robust, but lacks the ability to disable the indexing.

I do however have a friction thumb-shifter operating a second brake on my rear wheel.  This is extremely useful on a recumbent, as you can lock it on and sit astride the bike hands-free, but the benefits of stabilising the bike when using a kick-stand, faffing with luggage or securing it on trains are equally applicable to an upright.  If one of my shifters were damaged on a long tour, I could re-purpose it to operate the relevant derailleur.

Re: Touring Bikes?
« Reply #69 on: 14 January, 2022, 03:06:24 pm »
If I were setting up a bike for extended touring, I'd probably plump for either down tube or bar end shifters (that can be operated in friction mode). Easier to get replacement gear bits on the road if something like a cassette or derailleur breaks.

Why would parts be easier to get if you're using down tube or bar end shifters? And what relevance is that to broken cassettes* or mechs?

*Has anyone ever actually "broken" a cassette?!
Those wonderful norks are never far from my thoughts, oh yeah!

Re: Touring Bikes?
« Reply #70 on: 14 January, 2022, 03:09:23 pm »
If I were setting up a bike for extended touring, I'd probably plump for either down tube or bar end shifters (that can be operated in friction mode). Easier to get replacement gear bits on the road if something like a cassette or derailleur breaks.

Why would parts be easier to get if you're using down tube or bar end shifters? And what relevance is that to broken cassettes* or mechs?

*Has anyone ever actually "broken" a cassette?!

I think it's because as the shifters can be set to be friction rather then indexed it means if you end up with say an 8 speed cassette or a weird and wonderful derailleur you can still work it

Although I imagine breaking a cassette might be hard although if the wheel broke and you had to change to a different spec rear wheel same effect

Re: Touring Bikes?
« Reply #71 on: 14 January, 2022, 03:12:14 pm »
Ah, I see - any old cassette and mech will do...
Those wonderful norks are never far from my thoughts, oh yeah!

Re: Touring Bikes?
« Reply #72 on: 14 January, 2022, 03:23:13 pm »
If I were setting up a bike for extended touring, I'd probably plump for either down tube or bar end shifters (that can be operated in friction mode). Easier to get replacement gear bits on the road if something like a cassette or derailleur breaks.
Agreed.  My touring frames are custom built, so I have brazed on downtube lever bosses so that if my ergo levers or rear dropout get mangled I will have an escape route.  To that end, I carry a right hand friction lever - just in case.  No need to carry a left since changes on that side are less frequent and could be done by hand.

Re: Touring Bikes?
« Reply #73 on: 14 January, 2022, 03:40:21 pm »
Ah, I see - any old cassette and mech will do...

Exactly this. Ironically more of an issue now with the supply problems.

Being able to fit anything - say, 9spd cassette when you have a 10spd setup, or, more likely, a random rear mech because you've dropped clothing in the gearing and broken the mech.

Friction will work with anything.

My mercian has indexed bar ends, not sure of the model (they are really robust, I've crashed that bike multiple times in a day), that can be switched to friction mode. Terrific kit.
<i>Marmite slave</i>

Re: Touring Bikes?
« Reply #74 on: 14 January, 2022, 04:21:40 pm »
I still wouldn't be seen dead on a bike with bar end shifters  :P
Those wonderful norks are never far from my thoughts, oh yeah!