Author Topic: LEL equipment  (Read 30114 times)

Karla

  • car(e) free
Re: LEL equipment
« Reply #175 on: March 10, 2017, 11:38:18 am »
Get a USB light that you can charge and leave some USB power packs in your drop bags? 

Alternatively, get a light with replaceable 18650 cells and take some / leave some in your drop bags.

If you do want AA, the Fenix BT10 is an alternative to the Vision 1.  I haven't used it but have used its bigger brother the 18650-powered bigger brother the BT20, which was an excellent light that put the beam just where you needed it.
Someone on here once gave me a pompino for free

mattc

  • "Hannibal"
  • n.b. have grown beard since photo taken
    • Didcot Audaxes
Re: LEL equipment
« Reply #176 on: March 10, 2017, 06:28:06 pm »
Thoughts please on double AA battery powered light options outside of the Hope 1 option? I can't justify a dynamo setup this year.
Do you mean 2xAA? Not many of those with a decent output (sadly IMHO), but

with 4xAA this is posssibly the best around (at least with a shaped beam, reliable manufacturer etc - but see other reviews of which there are plenty!)
 https://www.bike-discount.de/en/buy/busch-mueller-ixon-iq-led-28755?currency=3&delivery_country=190&gclid=COm9iKbHzNICFQ4TGwod_eYOHw

(someone please tell me if that isn't the latest/best Ixon IQ - I find the model names very confusing).


_SOME _of us find it plenty adequate bright for all night-riding. (I'm not saying I don't also use a "main beam" for descending ... but I can manage without if I have to.)

(n.b. I haven't used the Fenix BT10)
Has never ridden RAAM
---------
No.11  Because of the great host of those who dislike the least appearance of "swank " when they travel the roads and lanes. - From Kuklos' 39 Articles

Re: LEL equipment
« Reply #177 on: March 10, 2017, 06:45:32 pm »
Thoughts please on double AA battery powered light options outside of the Hope 1 option? I can't justify a dynamo setup this year.
Do you mean 2xAA? Not many of those with a decent output (sadly IMHO), but

with 4xAA this is posssibly the best around (at least with a shaped beam, reliable manufacturer etc - but see other reviews of which there are plenty!)
 https://www.bike-discount.de/en/buy/busch-mueller-ixon-iq-led-28755?currency=3&delivery_country=190&gclid=COm9iKbHzNICFQ4TGwod_eYOHw

(someone please tell me if that isn't the latest/best Ixon IQ - I find the model names very confusing).


_SOME _of us find it plenty adequate bright for all night-riding. (I'm not saying I don't also use a "main beam" for descending ... but I can manage without if I have to.)

(n.b. I haven't used the Fenix BT10)

Yours is the lower end version, this is the current best one: https://www.bike-discount.de/en/buy/busch-mueller-ixon-iq-premium-led-accumulator-headlamp-139355

Two of these on your bikes and a set of spare batteries per night will see you through LEL perfectly. With two of them on the bike you don't have to stop to change batteries and you can add a 2nd one for the fast descents. Considering sleepstops, short nights in Scotland and some area's with streetlights/ or groupriding where you can keep the lights on lowbeam and the initial double set of batteries plus 4 spare sets would be enough for the entire LEL (if not, replacements are easily available at any roadside supermarket).
I use one of them as back up light in case I have an issue with my primary setup.

Re: LEL equipment
« Reply #178 on: March 10, 2017, 08:19:23 pm »
I used two B&M Ixon IQs (2009 vintage) for LEL'09 and PBP'11.

One in low power mode was good enough for most of the night riding, high power for descents. I only put the second one on when the first was flashing it's "running out of power" red light and then changed the batteries in the depleted one at the next control. I liked having a second one as a backup.

On PBP I loaned one of them to an Italian recumbent rider who's lights had failed and that got him to the finish. Only having one didn't affect me at all.

I think I used three or four sets of AA batteries during each event, so only one or two actual changes.
"Yes please" said Squirrel "biscuits are our favourite things."

mmmmartin

  • BPB 1/1: PBP 0/1
    • FNRttC
Re: LEL equipment
« Reply #179 on: March 12, 2017, 11:36:23 am »
I used two B&M Ixon IQs (2009 vintage) for LEL'09 and PBP'11.
On the grounds that if it's good enough for Greenbank it's good enough for me, I looked up these on the interwebs: they are surprisingly cheap at about £40 to £50 each - am I looking at the right ones?

mattc

  • "Hannibal"
  • n.b. have grown beard since photo taken
    • Didcot Audaxes
Re: LEL equipment
« Reply #180 on: March 12, 2017, 11:55:24 am »
Just make sure you buy a "PREMIUM". Ivo linked to one. They're about 45 Euros +6P&P there:


Yours is the lower end version, this is the current best one: https://www.bike-discount.de/en/buy/busch-mueller-ixon-iq-premium-led-accumulator-headlamp-139355

Two of these on your bikes and a set of spare batteries per night will see you through LEL perfectly. With two of them on the bike you don't have to stop to change batteries and you can add a 2nd one for the fast descents. Considering sleepstops, short nights in Scotland and some area's with streetlights/ or groupriding where you can keep the lights on lowbeam and the initial double set of batteries plus 4 spare sets would be enough for the entire LEL (if not, replacements are easily available at any roadside supermarket).
I use one of them as back up light in case I have an issue with my primary setup.

(the spec of the Premium isn't massively different, but it's well worth having!)
Has never ridden RAAM
---------
No.11  Because of the great host of those who dislike the least appearance of "swank " when they travel the roads and lanes. - From Kuklos' 39 Articles

Re: LEL equipment
« Reply #181 on: March 20, 2017, 04:53:05 pm »
a friend sent me this link... https://youtu.be/flk_dVHJWnk

I think he may be winding me up

mattc

  • "Hannibal"
  • n.b. have grown beard since photo taken
    • Didcot Audaxes
Re: LEL equipment
« Reply #182 on: March 20, 2017, 07:02:43 pm »
Are we still talking about wet-weather gloves? Oh good ...

I'm staggered by the people who suggest wearing washing up gloves to use as waterproof gloves on the bike.  Your hands will sweat and ultimately get very cold as they are not breathable.

It seems like a good bodge for those caught out in bad weather who have access to a supermarket.  I wouldn't plan on using it deliberately.

All gloves end up soaked if you cycle in them for an hour, and the rubber gloves should be admirably windproof (and therefore reasonably warm), but the lack of breathability means your hands are going to get fairly nasty if you use them for prolonged periods.


Quote
Buy a pair of proper cycling windproof/waterproof gloves.  Planet X sell gloves for not too much if you don't want Rapha.  I can't believe that people who can afford the cost to enter LEL, plus all the travel and training events are so hard up that they cannot afford a decent pair of gloves  :facepalm:

Agreed.  But I have sympathy for those from hot countries where such things are unobtanium, and weak currency makes buying them internationally an expensive gamble if they don't know what fits.

A video posted elsewhere today/yesterday from the India Pacific Race clearly shows a rider wearing bright yellow rubbery gloves with long cuffs. It's chucking it down with big winds. Dunno if he's happy with them, but he doesn't look any more miserable than the other wet riders!
Has never ridden RAAM
---------
No.11  Because of the great host of those who dislike the least appearance of "swank " when they travel the roads and lanes. - From Kuklos' 39 Articles

Re: LEL equipment
« Reply #183 on: March 20, 2017, 08:52:27 pm »
His comments (on video) were "They fill up with water but then the water warms up and your hands don't get any colder"
<i>Marmite slave</i>

mmmmartin

  • BPB 1/1: PBP 0/1
    • FNRttC
Re: LEL equipment
« Reply #184 on: March 20, 2017, 09:05:14 pm »
These are without doubt far and away the very best handwear for riding in the wet and cold. Flexible enough to allow braking and gear change and when wet they remain warm. I've used them in the very coldest conditions on and off the bike. Cycling gloves all get wet and they all then cool your hands, especially the fingers, in the wind caused by cycling. Mittens don't do that, and these are lined with fibre pile not cheap fleece.

http://www.cotswoldoutdoor.com/buffalo-pile-mitt-a3214123?id_colour=124

Planet X Paul

  • The Green Machine
Re: LEL equipment
« Reply #185 on: March 20, 2017, 09:18:34 pm »
I remember having the same discussion some years ago when on the ultra running circuit.  There is an event called The Fellsman; a tough 61 mile moorland challenge held in April when the weather can throw anything at you.  The year in question was one of the worst, and at about 1am on the Sunday morning when most were over 40 miles into the course, the event was cancelled and runners were evacuated off the course.  On another event held on the same day in the Lake District, a runner actually died because of the conditions.  In the days preceding the event, on the Fellrunner forum, people were actually talking about using Marigolds as their waterproof gloves for the event.  Just utterly un-bloody-believable.  You cannot take 'stupid' out of some people.  That is why I am aghast at similar suggestions being made on this forum for the sake of spending £20 on a proper pair of gloves !!!

Redlight

  • Enjoying life in the slow lane
Re: LEL equipment
« Reply #186 on: March 20, 2017, 10:27:51 pm »
These are without doubt far and away the very best handwear for riding in the wet and cold. Flexible enough to allow braking and gear change and when wet they remain warm. I've used them in the very coldest conditions on and off the bike. Cycling gloves all get wet and they all then cool your hands, especially the fingers, in the wind caused by cycling. Mittens don't do that, and these are lined with fibre pile not cheap fleece.

http://www.cotswoldoutdoor.com/buffalo-pile-mitt-a3214123?id_colour=124

I'm intrigued that you can change gear wearing them. I have a pair of "lobster" mittens that I wear when skiing but on the one time that I tried them on the bike I found it very hard to change gear (I am using Campag shifters, which are a bit more fiddly than the Shimano ones).
Like a river that don't know where it's flowing,
I took a wrong turn and I just kept going

mmmmartin

  • BPB 1/1: PBP 0/1
    • FNRttC
Re: LEL equipment
« Reply #187 on: March 20, 2017, 11:02:38 pm »
the ultra running circuit
I wore Buffalo mitts on the four times I started the High Peak Marathon, which is 42 miles in winter across Bleaklow, round the Derwent watershed, and it usually snows. Temperatures are often below freezing: Buffalo mitts are without doubt the best.

They are flexible enough to change gear using Shimano levers: obvs gear end shifters are easier. When soaking wet I have rtaken them off, squeezed them out and put them back on: still not cold.

But no one will listen to me on this: word of mouth is not as powerful as the marketing behind expensive gloves full of cheap synthetic insulation that will get wet and make your hands very cold.

BTW marigolds were used for ice climbing: windproof, waterprrof and if big enough you can wear thin woollen gloves underneath. IMO better than the expensive cycling gloves.

Re: LEL equipment
« Reply #188 on: March 20, 2017, 11:08:07 pm »
I have a buffalo summer sleeping bag. It punches above it's weight. I've used it for hammock camping and camping on the ground, without a tent. Sheds light rain, never felt damp in it, never woke with that clammy dampness, even when rained on. Can well believe buffalo mitts are the same on bike.
I hanker after a gilet made of the exact same material, reckon it would be ace for cycling.
<i>Marmite slave</i>

Planet X Paul

  • The Green Machine
Re: LEL equipment
« Reply #189 on: March 20, 2017, 11:11:38 pm »
the ultra running circuit
High Peak Marathon, which is 42 miles in winter across Bleaklow,

Been there, done that.  May have got the T-Shirt but can't remember. It was a while ago.  Buffalo mitts are good.  My partner has bad circulation and still uses a pair she must have had for 20 years and still swears by them.  Wouldn't be too different from using lobster type gloves and would certainly keep you warm.

Re: LEL equipment
« Reply #190 on: March 21, 2017, 01:22:43 am »
I've got a pair of Lowe Alpine Strom mitts. They've got internal fingers and work surprisingly well on the bike in extreme conditions, bit over the top for even the worst weather LEL could throw at you though.

Re: LEL equipment
« Reply #191 on: March 21, 2017, 08:52:08 pm »
Thanks for all your thoughts on lighting.

Next I'll be pondering clip on TT bars.

Re: LEL equipment
« Reply #192 on: March 29, 2017, 06:19:42 pm »
These are without doubt far and away the very best handwear for riding in the wet and cold. Flexible enough to allow braking and gear change and when wet they remain warm. I've used them in the very coldest conditions on and off the bike. Cycling gloves all get wet and they all then cool your hands, especially the fingers, in the wind caused by cycling. Mittens don't do that, and these are lined with fibre pile not cheap fleece.

http://www.cotswoldoutdoor.com/buffalo-pile-mitt-a3214123?id_colour=124

These are really good and weigh very little  :thumbsup:
We're supposed to be feeding them not fatting them........quote from chef on LEL

mmmmartin

  • BPB 1/1: PBP 0/1
    • FNRttC
Re: LEL equipment
« Reply #193 on: March 29, 2017, 10:45:41 pm »
I hanker after a gilet made of the exact same material, reckon it would be ace for cycling.
like ]this?
http://www.buffalosystems.co.uk/products/teclite-gilet/

also found these cycling specific mitts on the Buffalo website: http://www.buffalosystems.co.uk/products/hi-vis-mitt/

must say - i wouldn't recommend a Buffalo shirt for riding because they don't pack down that small and TBH if you need to wear one there's probably ice on the road so you shouldn't be on a bike. My Big Shirt has been very warm in all sorts of conditions that can best be described as "Scottish".

Re: LEL equipment
« Reply #194 on: April 08, 2017, 08:06:37 pm »
I hanker after a gilet made of the exact same material, reckon it would be ace for cycling.
like ]this?
http://www.buffalosystems.co.uk/products/teclite-gilet/

also found these cycling specific mitts on the Buffalo website: http://www.buffalosystems.co.uk/products/hi-vis-mitt/

must say - i wouldn't recommend a Buffalo shirt for riding because they don't pack down that small and TBH if you need to wear one there's probably ice on the road so you shouldn't be on a bike. My Big Shirt has been very warm in all sorts of conditions that can best be described as "Scottish".
So - when I was riding a couple of weeks ago, it was hovering between zero and -1 with rain and sleet, you wouldn't have been riding? I would have described that as perfect weather for Buffalo gear.

Those mittens look good. The gilet is close to what I'd want but for bike use I would want to be able to snug down the armpit holes and around the waist.
<i>Marmite slave</i>

Re: LEL equipment
« Reply #195 on: April 17, 2017, 07:56:45 am »
A bit late to this particular topic.

If you do want AA, the Fenix BT10 is an alternative to the Vision 1.  I haven't used it but have used its bigger brother the 18650-powered bigger brother the BT20, which was an excellent light that put the beam just where you needed it.

(n.b. I haven't used the Fenix BT10)

I have a BT10 and it's a cracking little light. Plenty powerful enough for night riding and it has a quirky double beam one of which aims a bit further up the road then the other. A neat idea IMO.

The only two problems with the BT10 are:

1. Fenix no longer make them. There are a couple (new) on Ebay at the mo' for just shy of £100.
2. The battery box has no indication which way round the batteries are supposed to go. Nor does it indicate how to line up the lid when you screw it back on. I solved that by scratching markings on the box and lid.

There are more powerful lights but the safety of having a decent light that runs off plain old AAs far outweighs any lack of lumens IMO.
You're only as successful as your last 1200...

vorsprung

  • Opposites Attract
    • Audaxing
Re: LEL equipment
« Reply #196 on: April 17, 2017, 08:37:36 am »
These are without doubt far and away the very best handwear for riding in the wet and cold. Flexible enough to allow braking and gear change and when wet they remain warm. I've used them in the very coldest conditions on and off the bike. Cycling gloves all get wet and they all then cool your hands, especially the fingers, in the wind caused by cycling. Mittens don't do that, and these are lined with fibre pile not cheap fleece.

http://www.cotswoldoutdoor.com/buffalo-pile-mitt-a3214123?id_colour=124

I've used gloves like this for cycle commuting in the middle of winter but for LEL they would be too warm

For summer rides (even overnight) I find that lightweight wind proof gloves are good.  Usually I take mitts + a pair of full length windproof gloves on a 400/600 or mitts + 2 pairs long gloves if rain is expected

If the temperatures are higher lightweight liner gloves are good




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Re: LEL equipment
« Reply #197 on: April 17, 2017, 01:19:06 pm »
..
You're only as successful as your last 1200...

Re: LEL equipment
« Reply #198 on: April 17, 2017, 07:34:58 pm »
Have used these now for years:

https://goo.gl/FLCqGd

Shower-roof for sure, though you hands will get wet in sustained rain; but at least they dry out (almost) as quickly!
Can also use a very thin pair of silk liners, when the temps really drop below 0 degrees - not bad for gloves I purchased over six years ago and still going strong!

Re: LEL equipment
« Reply #199 on: May 05, 2017, 05:48:09 pm »
So, here's the "equipment" I've bought for LEL. It arrived only today.



...is there a "bike porn" thread on YACF?  ;D
You're only as successful as your last 1200...