Author Topic: Tarzan (Kurt Searvogel)  (Read 259730 times)

Kim

  • An appetite for the epic, but no real stamina
Re: Tarzan (Kurt Searvogel)
« Reply #3375 on: February 02, 2016, 06:36:11 pm »
[...]people do come to Milton Keynes for a holiday, and return. It wouldn't be my first choice either but an American might feel more at home here with the grid road system and shopping centres.

Lest we forget: Milton Keynes did a passable[1] impression of New York in Superman IV

http://www.denofgeek.com/movies/superman-iv/33015/a-pilgrimage-to-the-filming-locations-of-superman-iv#main-content-area


[1] To an 8 year old Brit who'd never been to USAnia.  Less so when I happened to see it again as an adult.   ;D
Watching the TV without subtitles is like riding up a hill without using the gears :)

Wowbagger

  • Dez's butler
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Re: Tarzan (Kurt Searvogel)
« Reply #3376 on: February 02, 2016, 06:38:11 pm »
Tradition has it that USAnians visiting Britain go to London, Edinburgh and Stratford-upon-Avon. Kurt and Alicia would clearly have to travel by bike, and for old time's sake should include Lowestoft, Goole and Marsh Gibbon.
Whaddawewant? Gratification! Whendowewannit? Not just yet...

Re: Tarzan (Kurt Searvogel)
« Reply #3377 on: February 02, 2016, 06:55:34 pm »
Scotland is also very popular and I would definitely recommend it for cycling and food. Especially Fiddlers in Drumnodrochit on the banks of Loch Ness. Very good food, all fortified with whisky and probably every possible Scotch whisky available. Also worth touring Wales.

Polar Bear

  • aka Michael
Re: Tarzan (Kurt Searvogel)
« Reply #3378 on: February 02, 2016, 06:57:15 pm »
Would be great to have Kurt and Alicia at Long Itch.   Waddya think chaps?  THe friday night chip van and beer in the pub, the slow ride for food on Saturday?   Just up Kurt's street.  No?   :D
Professional McKenzie Friend and Paralegal.          goodem2@gmail.com     07802 709337.

Wowbagger

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Re: Tarzan (Kurt Searvogel)
« Reply #3379 on: February 02, 2016, 07:03:49 pm »
I can bring the tandem and we can have filthy bike swapping.
Whaddawewant? Gratification! Whendowewannit? Not just yet...

crowriver

  • Крис Б
Re: Tarzan (Kurt Searvogel)
« Reply #3380 on: February 02, 2016, 07:50:40 pm »
Scotland is also very popular and I would definitely recommend it for cycling and food. Especially Fiddlers in Drumnodrochit on the banks of Loch Ness. Very good food, all fortified with whisky and probably every possible Scotch whisky available. Also worth touring Wales.

 :thumbsup: :thumbsup:

Can't disagree with Scotland as a destination for cyclists. Except maybe for the weather and the midgies!  ;D

May/June or September/early October are the best times to avoid the latter. As for the former, it's pot luck I'm afraid.  ::-)
Embrace your inner Fred.

Bianchi Boy

  • Cycling is my doctor
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Re: Tarzan (Kurt Searvogel)
« Reply #3381 on: February 02, 2016, 07:52:02 pm »

Alf Tupper, that's a funny one! Kurt does like fish-n-chips... not to mention beer!!!  :thumbsup:

Still haven't tried beans on toast... will attempt to try and let you know...  ???
Really how can Kurt set a cycling record without the help of the cycling staples of fish n chips, beer and beans. Really these dam yanks!

Beer the is best carbo loading there is  :thumbsup:

BB
SRx11 - in 11 years

clarion

  • Tyke
Re: Tarzan (Kurt Searvogel)
« Reply #3382 on: February 02, 2016, 08:00:45 pm »
Yebbut... American beer? Yeuch!
We are all just prisoners here of our own (mobile) device.

Re: Tarzan (Kurt Searvogel)
« Reply #3383 on: February 02, 2016, 08:08:52 pm »
Not sure whether you can get baked beans over there either,

Yes, I know that many on this board will disagree with me, but let's face it, the best beans in the universe are the Boston baked beans, delicately cooked in molasse, onions and mustard...

Wowbagger

  • Dez's butler
    • Musings of a Gentleman Cyclist
Re: Tarzan (Kurt Searvogel)
« Reply #3384 on: February 02, 2016, 10:12:17 pm »
Scotland is also very popular and I would definitely recommend it for cycling and food. Especially Fiddlers in Drumnodrochit on the banks of Loch Ness. Very good food, all fortified with whisky and probably every possible Scotch whisky available. Also worth touring Wales.

 :thumbsup: :thumbsup:

Can't disagree with Scotland as a destination for cyclists. Except maybe for the weather and the midgies!  ;D

May/June or September/early October are the best times to avoid the latter. As for the former, it's pot luck I'm afraid.  ::-)

We were chewed to bits by the little buggers when we were over on Mull in late May 2014. Western Scotland tends to get its best weather in April/early May and you would be very unlucky to meet midges then.
Whaddawewant? Gratification! Whendowewannit? Not just yet...

Re: Tarzan (Kurt Searvogel)
« Reply #3385 on: February 02, 2016, 10:19:24 pm »
And people do come to Milton Keynes for a holiday, and return. It wouldn't be my first choice either but an American might feel more at home here with the grid road system and shopping centres. Plus it's handy for a lot of nice places to visit.

I suppose I'll have to admit staying there myself.

TimC

  • Bike pilot
Re: Tarzan (Kurt Searvogel)
« Reply #3386 on: February 02, 2016, 10:41:02 pm »
Is fish'n'chips even a thing in USAnia? :o

It has been attempted - on at least one occasion.
My grandfather was Editor-in-Chief of a local newspaper group in Nottingham and as I recall the story they printed a special edition 'front-page' with spoof Robin-Hoodery to be exported to a new start up somewhere in USA that wanted to create the 'proper' fish & chips in newspaper experience.

Every Irish bar in the entire country (and there must be millions) proudly serves fish'n'chips. There will be few Americans not familiar, even if they've never succumbed.

Kim

  • An appetite for the epic, but no real stamina
Re: Tarzan (Kurt Searvogel)
« Reply #3387 on: February 02, 2016, 10:42:10 pm »
How often does it turn out to be fish'n'crisps, thobut?
Watching the TV without subtitles is like riding up a hill without using the gears :)

TimC

  • Bike pilot
Re: Tarzan (Kurt Searvogel)
« Reply #3388 on: February 02, 2016, 10:45:39 pm »
How often does it turn out to be fish'n'crisps, thobut?

Never, in my experience (five visits to the USA so far this year, and several hundred in total).

Kim

  • An appetite for the epic, but no real stamina
Re: Tarzan (Kurt Searvogel)
« Reply #3389 on: February 02, 2016, 10:50:37 pm »
I remember falling foul of en_US 'chips' on a trip to the USA when I was a kid, but I don't think there was any fish involved.
Watching the TV without subtitles is like riding up a hill without using the gears :)

Re: Tarzan (Kurt Searvogel)
« Reply #3390 on: February 03, 2016, 12:02:10 am »
Sounds like some people need to visit the US again to update their stereotypical viewpoints.

No problem getting UK style real ales there when I lived there (west coast, east coast and a few random places in the middle), no shortage of curry or fish and chips either.
"Yes please" said Squirrel "biscuits are our favourite things."

Re: Tarzan (Kurt Searvogel)
« Reply #3391 on: February 03, 2016, 12:11:47 am »
No problem getting UK style real ales there when I lived there

Actually cask-conditioned? Or 'craft' beers, which are keg?



(I'll point out that I'm being a beer pedant here, not a beer snob. There are many very fine craft beers, it's just that the provisional wing of CAMRA gets most exercised at the notion of anything other than cask-conditioned being thought of as 'real ale.' Meh, says I - if it tastes good, and it's real enough to drink, then that's real enough for me.)

contango

  • NB have not grown beard since photo was taken
  • The Fat And The Furious
Re: Tarzan (Kurt Searvogel)
« Reply #3392 on: February 03, 2016, 04:12:23 am »
I never found a proper chippy whenever I've been to the USA. Not sure whether you can get baked beans over there either,
Tarzan and Whip would do well to come over to the UK, do some rides and enjoy some British stuff like fish, chips, beer in pubs and other stuff.

You can get baked beans this side of the water. I don't personally, can't stand the things, but my wife does.

I have yet to find what I'd call a "proper" chippy. One place about 15 miles from me serves fish and chips (and when they say "chips" they don't mean what a Brit would call crisps). The fish is breaded haddock in sticks (kind of like giant fish fingers, but fish fillets rather than tiny amounts of fish mashed up with lots of potato), and the chips are slices of potato cooked the way I'd expect chips to be cooked. It's nice, but not the same as English fish-n-chips.
Always carry a small flask of whisky in case of snakebite. And, furthermore, always carry a small snake.

contango

  • NB have not grown beard since photo was taken
  • The Fat And The Furious
Re: Tarzan (Kurt Searvogel)
« Reply #3393 on: February 03, 2016, 04:15:13 am »
Yebbut... American beer? Yeuch!

I guess you never ventured further than Bud Lite.

American beer is much more varied than yellow fizzy garbage with Lite on the end of its name. Traditionally American beer was served ice cold on the basis it was the only way you could tell it from urine. Now they've got their acts together and there are small breweries all over the country. If you want IPA, stout, porters, red ales, pumpkin ales, Oktoberfest ales, lagers, bocks, you'll probably find something you like.

Only this evening I was eating in a place that has its own brewery and they probably had 20 different beers on the menu, not including beers they didn't brew themselves. I went for a flight of five of them (for the princely sum of $8) and had a variety of styles.
Always carry a small flask of whisky in case of snakebite. And, furthermore, always carry a small snake.

crowriver

  • Крис Б
Re: Tarzan (Kurt Searvogel)
« Reply #3394 on: February 03, 2016, 09:49:51 am »
Aye, as with much else all over the globe, the American palate has evolved.

I quite enjoyed this beer during a visit to California a few years ago:

Embrace your inner Fred.

Re: Tarzan (Kurt Searvogel)
« Reply #3395 on: February 03, 2016, 10:58:10 am »
I know Kurt has a bit of an aversion to sleep deprivation, but he'd be very welcome at the Mersey Roads 24. He could ask Joel about it, he's ridden it a couple of times.
It's UMCA sanctioned, and there's a lot to see locally: Chester, North Wales, Liverpool, and of course the legendary Raven Cafe.

Re: Tarzan (Kurt Searvogel)
« Reply #3396 on: February 03, 2016, 11:47:54 am »
I never found a proper chippy whenever I've been to the USA. Not sure whether you can get baked beans over there either,
Tarzan and Whip would do well to come over to the UK, do some rides and enjoy some British stuff like fish, chips, beer in pubs and other stuff.

I don't believe this !

The 'baked bean' meal was brought to Europe from Eastern US / Canada. Baking beans was done by the Native First Nation People.
The first can of beans to come to the UK was only 130 years ago.

Have you never watched 'Blazing saddles' by Mel Brooks?

Re: Tarzan (Kurt Searvogel)
« Reply #3397 on: February 03, 2016, 11:50:20 am »
yebbut those aren't proper heinz baked beans, they are some sort of forrin stuff
<i>Marmite slave</i>

Re: Tarzan (Kurt Searvogel)
« Reply #3398 on: February 03, 2016, 11:57:41 am »
http://www.heinz.co.uk/en/Our-Company/About-Heinz/Heinz-Story

I've dropped so many gaffs on this forum, it now pays to research.

Mr Larrington

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Re: Tarzan (Kurt Searvogel)
« Reply #3399 on: February 03, 2016, 03:08:59 pm »
Aye, as with much else all over the globe, the American palate has evolved.

I quite enjoyed this beer during a visit to California a few years ago:



I first encountered thst in 2003, by 2008 thry had it on draught in the Wol Club in Battle Mountain :thumbsup:

In 2014 I spent a night about half a mile from the brewery in Fort Collins but by then I'd had to give it up chiz >:(
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