Author Topic: Carrying too much gear  (Read 2936 times)

Carrying too much gear
« on: March 18, 2021, 06:25:16 am »
Do others consider the amount of gear they carry whilst out on a local ride? ATM I don't have a  fast bike as such, a steel audax and a steel tourer. Even on the audax bike I have a rack, racktop bag, containing 2 inner tubes, puncture repair kit,  topeak alien multi-tool,  head torch, foil blanket for an emergency (15 years old), 2 lightweight retractable cable locks, latex gloves for oily repairs. Co2 inflator and spare cylinder,  goretex top, wet wipes, a Zeal HPX full size pump velcro strapped to my top tube, loose change and a pair of steel tyre levers that jangle. This is my typical audax  setup. Realistically, for thr short local 40 mile rides a seat pack would do. I CBA to declutter as I generally carry the above on an audax ride. What do other carry on local rides?

Re: Carrying too much gear
« Reply #1 on: March 18, 2021, 07:04:04 am »
Get rid of the rack and co2 tube*. I see skinny roadies whizzing past me with a bag under their
saddles the size of a postage stamp** (some without one) and their pockets bulging with stuff.

*     No need for this if you have a Zefal hpx.
**   Slight exaggeration, but you know what I mean.

Re: Carrying too much gear
« Reply #2 on: March 18, 2021, 07:12:31 am »
Back in 2020 when you were allowed to ride in groups of six. A CTC club member came off their bike after a collision with a van.  A foil blanket / bag was useful whilst waiting for an ambulance.   I carry puncture repair, foil bag, some snacks, basic phone on local rides. A full size zfx pump is only about 100g, so neither here nor there. If I’m planning on stopping, for instance meeting up with one other, I take an insulated gilet as well. I’ve been taking a hot chocolate now and again as well.

Re: Carrying too much gear
« Reply #3 on: March 18, 2021, 07:33:10 am »
Haven't actually ridden a bike for a long time but when I did, the standard stuff I'd carry on a ride was:
  • 2 x inner tubes
  • multi-tool
  • CO2 inflator and 2 cartridges
  • mini pump (tiny, as emergency backup - fits in saddlebag)
  • puncture repair patches
  • tyre levers (Pedros - plastic)
  • 1 lightweight retractable cable lock
  • spare chain link
  • latex gloves

So not that different to yours, but it all (just) fits in a small Topeak Aero Wedge - I'd carry my waterproof top in a pocket, along with anything else I'd expect to use (rather than hope not to use!), e.g. snacks, wipes/sanitiser, phone. Nothing jangles, because there's no wasted space! ;) I find that if I have a big bag, I'm inclined to fill it.

Agree that if you have a Zefal HPX you don't need CO2 as well. When I'm carrying my "good" pump (Topeak Road Morph), normally on longer rides/multi-day stuff, I don't bother with that. CO2 is handy on group rides to minimise faff time, though.

Re: Carrying too much gear
« Reply #4 on: March 18, 2021, 07:41:48 am »
My list just has the one inner tube and no CO2 as I’m using tubleless, and the spares kit includes some gaffer tape, zip ties and other bits and bobs.  But basically it’s similar - deal with routine mechanicals or bumps. I’m not riding to set speed records, and in any case I’m probably a bigger source of weight, drag and strange noises than my seat pack.

fboab

  • It's a fecking serious business, riding a bike
Re: Carrying too much gear
« Reply #5 on: March 18, 2021, 10:37:36 am »
My water bottles that I never drink weigh more than my tool kit.
2 tubes, tubeless repair shizzle, emergency patches, multi tool, tyre levers. Magic link (but no chain tool).

Wipes, antibac, soap flakes.

Phone. Waterproof if the forecast warrants it. Card.

ETA:pump. I didn't think of it as there's one attached to every bike.
TSS is not Total Sex Score, Chris!

Re: Carrying too much gear
« Reply #6 on: March 18, 2021, 10:43:02 am »
One tube, one CO2, a small pouch containing levers, multitool (inc chain tool), CO2 head, emergency patches; and between zero and one pumps. Usually stuffed into jersey pockets unless I need space for caek.

Re: Carrying too much gear
« Reply #7 on: March 18, 2021, 11:02:36 am »
Talking of CO2 cartridges. I often see loads of what look like CO2 cartridges spilt by the side of the road.
Are they actually shed from cyclists who haven't zipped their saddlebags up tightly enough or are they actually laughing gas or something from the local yoof?

There's normally one or two but yesterday I saw dozens all in one place, which suggests they're not from a single cyclist.

Feanor

  • It's mostly downhill from here.
Re: Carrying too much gear
« Reply #8 on: March 18, 2021, 11:05:05 am »
Normal-sized wedge pack containing:

2 x spare tube,
plastic tyre levers;
couple of sections of old inner tube for tyre boots;
Co2 inflator and 2 cylinders;
Multi-tool with chain splitter;
couple of quick links;
Spare rear mech hanger because it weighs nothing and it might as well live here as in the garage.

Mini-pump lives on the bike.

Waterproof in jersey pocket, if I think I might need it.
Phone / £20 note / bank card in a zip-lock freezer bag in jersey pocket.

That's all I will have on a typical 200 and summer 300 also.
Only go to a bigger pack if I'm going to need to adjust my layering due to riding in the dark hours, or carry food for long stretches in the middle of nowhere.

So on the lighter weight side on Audax etc.

What I really don't get it the Roadie Chic which says no pack on the bike - spoils the clean lines.
But the rider looks like a badly-stuffed teddy bear, with pumps and bananas and everything else hanging out of their lumpy bulging jersey pockets. Not a great look.

Re: Carrying too much gear
« Reply #9 on: March 18, 2021, 11:06:36 am »
Talking of CO2 cartridges. I often see loads of what look like CO2 cartridges spilt by the side of the road.
Are they actually shed from cyclists who haven't zipped their saddlebags up tightly enough or are they actually laughing gas or something from the local yoof?

There's normally one or two but yesterday I saw dozens all in one place, which suggests they're not from a single cyclist.

Nitrous oxide from youths holding clandestine cake-decorating competitions in laybys.

https://duckduckgo.com/?q=nitrous+oxide+litter&t=osx&iar=images&iax=images&ia=images

(usually unthreaded end, shiny silver body, slightly smaller than typical cyclist CO2 canisters)

Feanor

  • It's mostly downhill from here.
Re: Carrying too much gear
« Reply #10 on: March 18, 2021, 11:08:16 am »
Talking of CO2 cartridges. I often see loads of what look like CO2 cartridges spilt by the side of the road.
Are they actually shed from cyclists who haven't zipped their saddlebags up tightly enough or are they actually laughing gas or something from the local yoof?

There's normally one or two but yesterday I saw dozens all in one place, which suggests they're not from a single cyclist.

If you look at them closely, you'll see they are not bike CO2 cartridges.
They are typically smaller, and not threaded.
Likely nitrous oxide, as used in whipped cream do-hickies.

So your second guess is closer to the mark, I think.

ETA: Wot he said ^^^

Bernster

  • ACME (Herts Branch)
Re: Carrying too much gear
« Reply #11 on: March 18, 2021, 11:17:42 am »
I tend to carry pretty much everything mentioned above (less the nitrous oxide canisters  ;D), but also a spare cleat bolt, some cable ties and rubber bands (which weigh nothing, and tend to come in quite handy for various things). The effort to remove them all from my bag for shorter rides isn't worth it for the pretty modest weight gains.

Re: Carrying too much gear
« Reply #12 on: March 18, 2021, 11:18:02 am »
I see skinny roadies whizzing past me with a bag under their
saddles the size of a postage stamp** (some without one) and their pockets bulging with stuff.
They rely on that modern universal fit every circumstance tool.  The mobile phone to call to be picked up.  It's no good them carrying tools because they don't know what to do since the bike is serviced every year.  Me, I am an old git who still prefers to be self sufficient, just as if on tour.  I reject even a multitool in favour of loose tools of just the sizes I need.  Yes I use steel tyre levers bought 50 years ago, and no they do not rattle because they are tied together with my individual allen keys.  Even with 2 inner tubes this kit fits in one side pocket of a Nelson saddlebag or larger.

For those of us that use bikes with different transmissions, put an appropriately sized quicklink inside the handlebar plug of each machine.

JonB

  • Granny Ring ... Yes Please!
Re: Carrying too much gear
« Reply #13 on: March 18, 2021, 11:27:06 am »
I think I carry a lot more than most and like the OP I don't bother decluttering for a short ride. I've given up trying to go lightweight, I'm just more comfortable carrying this stuff than trying to weigh up what I'll need on any given ride (it's stressful enough trying to get the clothing right)
- 3 inner tubes
- Spare tyre
- Topeak frame pump or Lezyne + CO2 in the saddle bag (depending on bike)
- 15mm spanner (if on fixed)
- Foil blanket
- A few bits of food (Snickers or something similar)
- chain links
- multi tool + chain tool + cable ties
- Lightweight retractable lock
- Clothing will vary but usually a jacket and spare gloves (if wet) and a layer or two if on anything over a 300
- Spare front light
I hate having stuff in my pockets apart from the phone, money and keys so it all goes in a Barley, Pendle or Nelson

Karla

  • car(e) free
    • Lost Byway - around the world by bike
Re: Carrying too much gear
« Reply #14 on: March 18, 2021, 11:41:48 am »
For a local ride:


2*tubes
Gas regulator and 2*cylinders
Tyre boot
Tyre levers
Patch kit
Multitool

All that fits in a wedge pack, and I don't have to think about what to pack, it's my standard kit.  Spare clothing goes in my pocket, as does a tiny mini pump if I have any huge reason to be worried about punctures.  Nothing rattles because it has no space to rattle.

Don't think about whether you can imagine a certain scenario happening, think about how likely it is to happen, and whether packing for it is a proportionate response.

Diesel

  • or Richard
Re: Carrying too much gear
« Reply #15 on: March 18, 2021, 11:54:58 am »
In principle I carry the same minimum on all rides as who know when the chain will break etc.

One addition I have carried for last couple of years is a mini-Leatherman. Not sure if necessary and mainly used for catering duties such as cake cutting and bottle opening (as Lightning Phil will testify to). But it has been useful on a couple of club rides for the less kitted out riders. One turned up with newly fitted raceblades with the straps catching in the spokes. I should have trimmed them, he said.  - Scissors? Ta-da I replied...

T42

  • *** fool in a hurry
Re: Carrying too much gear
« Reply #16 on: March 18, 2021, 11:56:00 am »
Fairly similar to every one else but without a tyre/boot, mostly in an HB bag and with a couple of tubes, levers & multitool wrapped in a peerless white cloth (har) in a poky wee bag under the saddle.  I only put a saddlebag on these days if I'm doing a decent distance or bringing home a loaf or such.

What do I add that others might not?  Bog roll, a whistle, a supermarket bag, a pair of folding scissors like these, a mini-Opinel, a couple of AA cells for the GPS and AAAs for the battery rearlight. My pump is a Road Morph 'cos my right shoulder is dodgy. Used to carry a CO2 inflator but the cartridges are a rip-off.
I've dusted all those old bottles and set them up straight.

Re: Carrying too much gear
« Reply #17 on: March 18, 2021, 12:15:27 pm »
On my fast bike I have puncture kit, Allen key tool and chain tool and two inner tubes with a frame mounted pump

On the tourer I have the same but normally a small adjustable and a 10mm spanner as more likely to be out with some of the rest of our fleet with that bike

Often have a selection of different inner tubes for the same reason. Normally have some additional/options of clothing as well but then sometimes have that on the fast bike

Kim

  • Timelord
Re: Carrying too much gear
« Reply #18 on: March 18, 2021, 12:22:28 pm »
Unless I'm literally just riding to the shops, I tend to carry most of my full touring toolkit (but fewer spares), because the weight difference is negligible and I can't be arsed faffing about.  It's all good training, and a catastrophic failure is just as likely on a 40km ride from home as it is on an epic tour.

Clothing and food/water will vary according to how far and what weather.

(I'm currently carrying a spare drive-side idler for the Streetmachine around, because I molished a new one from marine fuel hose back in September and wasn't how sure it would last, or whether it would fail gracefully.  At some point I'll probably take that out.)
Careful, Kim. Your sarcasm's showing...

Re: Carrying too much gear
« Reply #19 on: March 18, 2021, 12:27:44 pm »
One addition I have carried for last couple of years is a mini-Leatherman. Not sure if necessary and mainly used for catering duties such as cake cutting and bottle opening (as Lightning Phil will testify to). But it has been useful on a couple of club rides for the less kitted out riders. One turned up with newly fitted raceblades with the straps catching in the spokes. I should have trimmed them, he said.  - Scissors? Ta-da I replied...
Similarly I carry a Swiss Army Knife, a fairly big one.  A club mate had locked his bike with a thin wire cafe lock, and did not have the key.  5 minutes with the file edge blade and his bike was released.  Scissors are useful as you say for trimming other people's cable ties.  Over the years, when asked why I carry so much (not much in reality) I reply "it is to get YOU home".  Back 50 years ago I would carry a set of metric spanners, but now allen keys are more common meaning less bulk and weight. 

As Kim says, my day to day tool kit is the same as I take on a 4 week tour.  I cannot think of anything I could sensibly trim out - ok, maybe that 6 ounces of Swiss Army Knife..

Re: Carrying too much gear
« Reply #20 on: March 18, 2021, 12:28:04 pm »
Multi tool. 60ml sealant,core remover,Pump,co2,cleat bolt.,Zip tie.,Quick link,2 tyre levers, 1x tube (used once every 12000km on average), face mask.

Fits in large toppeak wedge with space for 2x iced finger,pasty, packet of crisps(deflated).

As ride progresses I make space for discarded clothing by eating.

Re: Carrying too much gear
« Reply #21 on: March 18, 2021, 12:34:31 pm »
Ooh - forgot that I carry a tyre boot (Park) as well!

Kim

  • Timelord
Re: Carrying too much gear
« Reply #22 on: March 18, 2021, 12:37:39 pm »
Yeah, there's a SAK in my kit that's occasionally been useful, but not really for bike stuff apart from trimming cable ties and digging flints out of tyres.  I think it last came out to help a farmer with a difficult knot.

I've been carrying a 6" adjustable spanner around for years because, counter-intuitively given the fasteners on modern bikes, it's my most frequently used tool.

I have a little baggie of nuts, bolts, chain links, etc that I've almost never needed, but stuff that small and potentially ride-saving would be rude not to carry.
Careful, Kim. Your sarcasm's showing...

Re: Carrying too much gear
« Reply #23 on: March 18, 2021, 12:39:53 pm »
The thing about local rides is that fettling / making good can wait until you get home, so you only need to worry about things that will render the bike unrideable, which realistically is punctures or a snapped chain, and they can be dealt with with jersey pocket stuffs.

Kim

  • Timelord
Re: Carrying too much gear
« Reply #24 on: March 18, 2021, 12:50:20 pm »
The thing about local rides is that fettling / making good can wait until you get home, so you only need to worry about things that will render the bike unrideable, which realistically is punctures or a snapped chain, and they can be dealt with with jersey pocket stuffs.

Apart from the stuff that needs repeated tweaking to get right under real world conditions, which is best done during a ride.  And anything sufficiently minor that you forget about it completely as soon as you get home.

But yeah, it's mostly tyres, chains and gear cables[1] that are likely to need fixing at the roadside.  And Stuff That Gets Bent, though unless you're in the habit of crashing, that tends to be a result of train travel and frequent lockings-up, rather than day rides.


[1] I *could* ride home in single-speed mode, or I could spend 10 minutes sorting out the cable and have a working knee when I arrive.
Careful, Kim. Your sarcasm's showing...