Author Topic: Riding a brompton  (Read 1737 times)

velosam

  • '.....you used to be an apple on a stick.'
Riding a brompton
« on: November 09, 2020, 10:13:41 am »
So I finally got around to riding a brompton. I am using it as a kickstart into riding without assistance and its easier just to roll out of the house, as the bike lives in the hallway.

For pootling around town, using quiet roads and the myriad of small passageways around Ruislip, its great. Also I just step out for a quick 20 mins, wearing just my normal clothing, which is useful especially if I am taking a quick break from homeworking.  Hopefully it will be used as much once the novelty factor wears off!

Its also feels livelier than I expected and even if I have to do a quick pavement detour (from the very busy roads), its easier to just hop on and off.

So a thumbs up for now.

Re: Riding a brompton
« Reply #1 on: November 09, 2020, 12:42:47 pm »
Which one did you get and how much did it cost?

Re: Riding a brompton
« Reply #2 on: November 09, 2020, 01:35:06 pm »
If you fit a loaded bag to the luggage block on the front, stability becomes much improved.

velosam

  • '.....you used to be an apple on a stick.'
Re: Riding a brompton
« Reply #3 on: November 09, 2020, 01:39:44 pm »
Which one did you get and how much did it cost?

Its a M6, but its borrowed not mine and its very nice. I am just grateful to have it to use without the commitment of having to buy one. Trying to rid of a few bikes.

Took me awhile to understand the gears and the fold! I was surprised how small it folds, especially with folding pedal.

I dont have a bag, as its just for pottering  around. Also, I am not leaving it anywhere, as its not mine and I don't want any chance of it getting nicked. So I just ride around and bring it straight home, where it lives in the hallway. lol

jiberjaber

  • ... Fancy Pants \o/ ...
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Re: Riding a brompton
« Reply #4 on: November 09, 2020, 06:36:45 pm »
Watch how big a kerb you are hopping up and down from - I am given to understand it can stress the rear hinge and lead to premature failure/replacement  :)
Regards,

Joergen

robgul

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Re: Riding a brompton
« Reply #5 on: November 09, 2020, 07:00:31 pm »
Tip: If you're used to riding a diamond frame bike .... don't let go of the bars when stopped and standing with your feet on the ground and expect the bike to be supported by your thighs . . . the Brommie will fall over  :hand:
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Kim

  • Timelord
Re: Riding a brompton
« Reply #6 on: November 09, 2020, 08:03:37 pm »
Tip: If you're used to riding a diamond frame bike .... don't let go of the bars when stopped and standing with your feet on the ground and expect the bike to be supported by your thighs . . . the Brommie will fall over  :hand:

I do this with tedious irregularity.
Careful, Kim. Your sarcasm's showing...

Re: Riding a brompton
« Reply #7 on: November 09, 2020, 08:09:59 pm »
Must say I do like Bromptons but can't justify the cost these days.
Get a bicycle. You will never regret it, if you live- Mark Twain

Re: Riding a brompton
« Reply #8 on: November 09, 2020, 08:18:52 pm »
Tip: If you're used to riding a diamond frame bike .... don't let go of the bars when stopped and standing with your feet on the ground and expect the bike to be supported by your thighs . . . the Brommie will fall over  :hand:

I do this with tedious irregularity.

I've been doing the same with the Dahon.

That or jumping everytime I take the front bag off and the bike tips from centrestand and front wheel to stand and back wheel. Every damn time I think it's falling over and make a mad grab/flail for the handlebars.
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citoyen

  • Occasionally rides a bike
Re: Riding a brompton
« Reply #9 on: November 09, 2020, 08:41:57 pm »
Tip: If you're used to riding a diamond frame bike .... don't let go of the bars when stopped and standing with your feet on the ground and expect the bike to be supported by your thighs . . . the Brommie will fall over  :hand:

BTDTGTTS

However, that's not as embarrassing as riding away from the pub on a busy summer's evening, with crowds of people supping outside and watching one's departure, thus witnessing one's collapse as one belatedly realises one hadn't properly secured the central hinge...

Its also feels livelier than I expected

I find this is a major benefit when weaving through London traffic.

Stick with it, you'll be riding no-handed soon enough.
"The future's all yours, you lousy bicycles."

Re: Riding a brompton
« Reply #10 on: November 10, 2020, 12:12:01 am »
Tip: If you're used to riding a diamond frame bike .... don't let go of the bars when stopped and standing with your feet on the ground and expect the bike to be supported by your thighs . . . the Brommie will fall over  :hand:

This becomes a safety feature should the bike become less-than-upright* while riding, as you can stay vertical.

(* for example, through an ill-advised ford with a slippery bottom, not that I've ever done this)

velosam

  • '.....you used to be an apple on a stick.'
Re: Riding a brompton
« Reply #11 on: November 10, 2020, 09:31:20 am »
I have not dared tried the no hands yet as the front wobbles a bit.  Havent jumped off kerbs I just use the dropped kerbs as there are drives everywhere. Bit anxious about some of the ruts in the road, as they seem ideally sized to fit the front wheel!

On the plus side, its really easy to get through all the barriers in place.

robgul

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Re: Riding a brompton
« Reply #12 on: November 10, 2020, 11:11:33 am »
Tip: If you're used to riding a diamond frame bike .... don't let go of the bars when stopped and standing with your feet on the ground and expect the bike to be supported by your thighs . . . the Brommie will fall over  :hand:

I do this with tedious irregularity.

When we go to see our grandson I take the Brommie to riding with and he always reminds me . . .  and he always lets me win the race on the final 1/2 mile to the cafe as he knows I'll buy the ice-cream.
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Gattopardo

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Re: Riding a brompton
« Reply #13 on: November 10, 2020, 01:25:57 pm »
Tip: If you're used to riding a diamond frame bike .... don't let go of the bars when stopped and standing with your feet on the ground and expect the bike to be supported by your thighs . . . the Brommie will fall over  :hand:

Have never done that, and it didn't take a while to figure out what happened.

Re: Riding a brompton
« Reply #14 on: November 10, 2020, 08:25:00 pm »
I had a Brompton about 10 years ago to use for Bikeability training; it was convenient to be able to jump on the tube in peak hours to get to and from assignments.

I never enjoyed riding it. Being used to Moultons, I found the lack of front suspension on a high pressure small wheel a real handicap, through having to keep one eye permanently on the road surface to avoid any imperfections, of which there were plenty.

Did enjoy demonstrating the "transformer" capability to the kids though!

Re: Riding a brompton
« Reply #15 on: November 12, 2020, 09:32:14 pm »
"Its also feels livelier than I expected and even if I have to do a quick pavement detour (from the very busy roads), its easier to just hop on and off."

Rode a Brompton from Kings X to Chas. Roberts, Croydon and back some years ago.  On the way back traffic was gridlocked due to an incident.  In Trafalgar Square it was wall-to-wall buses.  Thanks to all that my Brompton was the fastest thing on the road (and pavement where appropriate).  Very enjoyable. 
Sic transit and all that..

Re: Riding a brompton
« Reply #16 on: November 12, 2020, 10:11:40 pm »
Beware potholes  :hand:  Cat had a meeting with one in Wantage; result trip to A&E with blue flashing lights and 12 months off and on work before the NHS worked out what she had damaged in her knee. The Brommie needed a bit of surgical intervention as well, she assures me it is now right.

I rode her Brommie and was unimpressed (which makes me an exception to the rule I know). My Montana, while inferior in a lot of respects (and 1/4 of the price) is a much nicer ride with 20" wheels and still very nippy. If I could justify the expense my first choice would be a Tern of some description (but I also don't need the qualities for which the Brompton excells).

Paul

  • L'enfer, c'est les autos.
Re: Riding a brompton
« Reply #17 on: November 13, 2020, 02:48:20 pm »
I'm no fan of the ride, but that's not why I bought it, and I'm still using it (now and again) 12 years on. It's great for those multi-modal journeys or just if you need to store it somewhere cramped.
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Kim

  • Timelord
Re: Riding a brompton
« Reply #18 on: November 13, 2020, 07:27:17 pm »
Quite, Bromptons aren't especially fun to ride (though I think the S-type is an improvement over the M in this respect - still dog slow, but it handles better), but that's not really what they're for.  They're about BloodyTrains and never having to lock your bike up unattended and nipping thorugh traffic and such.  A typical 20" Dahon or similar gives a much better ride, but sacrifices the convenience of the Brompton fold.

With such small wheels, potholes are a much greater liability than the tyre width might suggest.
Careful, Kim. Your sarcasm's showing...

velosam

  • '.....you used to be an apple on a stick.'
Re: Riding a brompton
« Reply #19 on: November 16, 2020, 05:35:17 pm »
Hmm discovered that on the uneven pavements as I was trying to dodge some large puddles.

However for a 20-30min ride around the neighbourhood, enjoying some parks, it’s just more enjoyable than a bigger bike and I feel less intimidating than on a larger bike. I also tend to ride much more sedately as nothing in it encourages speed.   The quick steering makes sure I have my wits around me.
 I also tend to just unfold, jump on, ride, fold and don’t need to think about it too much.

So still in the honeymoon period.

quixoticgeek

  • Mostly Harmless
Re: Riding a brompton
« Reply #20 on: November 26, 2020, 04:54:53 pm »
Quite, Bromptons aren't especially fun to ride (though I think the S-type is an improvement over the M in this respect - still dog slow, but it handles better), but that's not really what they're for.  They're about BloodyTrains and never having to lock your bike up unattended and nipping thorugh traffic and such.  A typical 20" Dahon or similar gives a much better ride, but sacrifices the convenience of the Brompton fold.

With such small wheels, potholes are a much greater liability than the tyre width might suggest.

I almost always enjoy riding my Brompton. I just did a run to the shops to buy potatoes, and coming out of the shop, did an extra 6km lap round the local lake cos it's a nice evening. It wasn't fast, but it was fun. Even tho it was my Brompton I have that warm fuzzy post ride glow.

I love how nippy and responsive my Brompton is. Sure she's not great on hills, but in the city, she's great. Brompton's work brilliantly in Dutch cities too. And when you make a mistake in your route, you can spin round within a fietspad cos the turning circle is so small.

Brompton's are great fun. Practical too, for certain values of practical.

J
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Re: Riding a brompton
« Reply #21 on: November 26, 2020, 05:19:44 pm »

I love how nippy and responsive my Brompton is. Sure she's not great on hills, but in the city, she's great. Brompton's work brilliantly in Dutch cities too. And when you make a mistake in your route, you can spin round within a fietspad cos the turning circle is so small.

Brompton's are great fun. Practical too, for certain values of practical.

J

+1.  Nippy, responsive & fun  and not that slow either.  (flat-bar, 3 speed on kojak tyres)

Kim

  • Timelord
Re: Riding a brompton
« Reply #22 on: November 26, 2020, 05:27:39 pm »
Quite, Bromptons aren't especially fun to ride (though I think the S-type is an improvement over the M in this respect - still dog slow, but it handles better), but that's not really what they're for.  They're about BloodyTrains and never having to lock your bike up unattended and nipping thorugh traffic and such.  A typical 20" Dahon or similar gives a much better ride, but sacrifices the convenience of the Brompton fold.

With such small wheels, potholes are a much greater liability than the tyre width might suggest.

I almost always enjoy riding my Brompton. I just did a run to the shops to buy potatoes, and coming out of the shop, did an extra 6km lap round the local lake cos it's a nice evening. It wasn't fast, but it was fun. Even tho it was my Brompton I have that warm fuzzy post ride glow.

I love how nippy and responsive my Brompton is. Sure she's not great on hills, but in the city, she's great. Brompton's work brilliantly in Dutch cities too. And when you make a mistake in your route, you can spin round within a fietspad cos the turning circle is so small.

Brompton's are great fun. Practical too, for certain values of practical.

This is all true.  It's one of the other types of fun.
Careful, Kim. Your sarcasm's showing...

PaulF

  • "World's Scariest Barman"
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Re: Riding a brompton
« Reply #23 on: November 26, 2020, 08:16:54 pm »
Quite, Bromptons aren't especially fun to ride (though I think the S-type is an improvement over the M in this respect - still dog slow, but it handles better), but that's not really what they're for.  They're about BloodyTrains and never having to lock your bike up unattended and nipping thorugh traffic and such.  A typical 20" Dahon or similar gives a much better ride, but sacrifices the convenience of the Brompton fold.

With such small wheels, potholes are a much greater liability than the tyre width might suggest.

I almost always enjoy riding my Brompton. I just did a run to the shops to buy potatoes, and coming out of the shop, did an extra 6km lap round the local lake cos it's a nice evening. It wasn't fast, but it was fun. Even tho it was my Brompton I have that warm fuzzy post ride glow.

I love how nippy and responsive my Brompton is. Sure she's not great on hills, but in the city, she's great. Brompton's work brilliantly in Dutch cities too. And when you make a mistake in your route, you can spin round within a fietspad cos the turning circle is so small.

Brompton's are great fun. Practical too, for certain values of practical.

J

All of the above :) Fun to ride, I find it responsive and not too shabby uphill; the end of most rides for me is up about a 6% hill and even the 3 speed is ok.

Kim

  • Timelord
Re: Riding a brompton
« Reply #24 on: November 26, 2020, 08:51:31 pm »
In performance terms, uphill is what the Brompton's best at.  But it's not about performance.
Careful, Kim. Your sarcasm's showing...