Author Topic: Winter bike.  (Read 2470 times)

fd3

Re: Winter bike.
« Reply #25 on: January 10, 2021, 01:04:26 pm »
As the above.  I have the SPM and the fixed gear df, both have mudguards.  If it gets snowy/icy I will either fit the studded tyres to the Dfixie or try the trike (the only bike currently without full mudguards - not because it’s a summer racer, but rather because of the cost).
Strange things are afoot at the circle K.

Re: Winter bike.
« Reply #26 on: January 10, 2021, 01:20:54 pm »
when the roads are liable to be covered in crap, mudguards are a no-brainer.   That is most of the year IME.  The difference in winter is that the crap off the road is both more plentiful and likely to be  highly corrosive (road salt). 

Some folk ride fixed gear in winter; I sometimes do that, but more often use an IGH, fitted to a bike that will largely resist crud n'corrosion in other ways.
Both have inherently simple exposed transmission parts; keeping a derailleur system working in the winter requires a fair bit more effort IME.

cheers

quixoticgeek

  • Mostly Harmless
Re: Winter bike.
« Reply #27 on: January 10, 2021, 05:32:50 pm »
when the roads are liable to be covered in crap, mudguards are a no-brainer.   That is most of the year IME.  The difference in winter is that the crap off the road is both more plentiful and likely to be  highly corrosive (road salt). 

Some folk ride fixed gear in winter; I sometimes do that, but more often use an IGH, fitted to a bike that will largely resist crud n'corrosion in other ways.
Both have inherently simple exposed transmission parts; keeping a derailleur system working in the winter requires a fair bit more effort IME.

My winter routine doesn't much differ from the rest of the year. If the roads are wet, and they have recently salted, I'll rinse down the bike with normal water. Then oil the chain. If not salted, I'll just lube the chain. This is on a steel framed bike with 11speed Di2. Tho I'm not doing big distances maybe only 100-200k or so a week.

J
--
Beer, bikes, and backpacking
http://b.42q.eu/

Re: Winter bike.
« Reply #28 on: January 10, 2021, 05:56:33 pm »
my hack bike gets washed about once every two years whether it needs it or not.  In the meantime it gets rained on which keeps most of the crud at bay.     Washing the bike is the thing that keeps a derailleur transmission alive (just starting every ride with a clean chain is a major improvement), but there is simply no need to do this with some other transmissions, which makes for a considerably  easier life.

I got bored with cleaning/maintaining/replacing derailleur transmissions on training/hack bikes about thirty-odd years ago.

cheers