Author Topic: 1995 Trek 820 to adventure commuter conversion  (Read 4492 times)

Cudzoziemiec

  • Eating all the pies and drinking all the tea.
Re: 1995 Trek 820 to adventure commuter conversion
« Reply #25 on: January 24, 2021, 03:06:22 pm »
Well, I guess that demonstrates the need for the safety recall!
Riding a bike through a city is like navigating the collective neural pathways of a vast global mind.

Re: 1995 Trek 820 to adventure commuter conversion
« Reply #26 on: January 24, 2021, 03:26:36 pm »
Hasn't got that far yet!
*waits for penetrating oil to soak in*

Re: 1995 Trek 820 to adventure commuter conversion
« Reply #27 on: January 24, 2021, 11:07:41 pm »
I can recommend the 26" "Double Fighters", they're a great general duty tyre that rolls incredibly well and are wide enough to provide a decent level of suspension on a fully rigid mtb.  Also ime, they work really well set up as tubeless :thumbsup:
Most of the stuff I say is true because I saw it in a dream and I don't have the presence of mind to make up lies when I'm asleep.   Bryan Andreas

Re: 1995 Trek 820 to adventure commuter conversion
« Reply #28 on: January 25, 2021, 01:16:57 pm »
That's good to know, thanks Bolt.

Meanwhile, I've conceded defeat with the driveside crank bolt - I've limited lockdown breaker bar options and I think my tool for it is starting to round out.

I'm going to have to take the frame to the LBS, so went ahead and stripped it. I can now add a rack bolt to the list of things that will need skill/cunning/violence to remove too. Grease wasn't much in evidence anywhere.

I've got a nice collection of cracked cantilever brake collars now:



And found the purple as I was taking flash photos of the bottom bracket mounted front derailleur:


Re: 1995 Trek 820 to adventure commuter conversion
« Reply #29 on: January 25, 2021, 07:53:03 pm »
The LBS manager casually asked about the nature of the safety recall...

(click to show/hide)

Re: 1995 Trek 820 to adventure commuter conversion
« Reply #30 on: February 03, 2021, 07:19:27 pm »

Phewp!

Finally got the frame stripped down! The LBS had to get 2 people, breaker bar and heat onto the drive side crank bolt, and it's taken me a couple of days of soaking with penetrating oil to finally be able to muscle the bottom bracket out.



The frame's not in too bad a condition given its age, but the steel is showing in a few places and, I think where a lock might have been hung, the clear topcoat is a bit scuffed.

What might be a good (and reasonably inexpensive) way of treating these areas before I start building the bike up again? Gently knock back the rust, get some nail varnish over the exposed frame and get some car polish or similar on there to freshen up the gloss?









Paul

  • L'enfer, c'est les autos.
Re: 1995 Trek 820 to adventure commuter conversion
« Reply #31 on: February 03, 2021, 11:12:41 pm »
Admirable fettling.

What problem does that horrible front mech attachment system solve?
What's so funny about peace, love and understanding?

LittleWheelsandBig

  • Whimsy Rider
Re: 1995 Trek 820 to adventure commuter conversion
« Reply #32 on: February 04, 2021, 12:05:17 am »
Setting up the front mech by screwing in the BB cup. Easy and fast with a pneumatic tool. Most of these sorts of changes are designed to aid the manufacturer, not the rider.
Wheel meet again, don't know where, don't know when...

Kim

  • Timelord
Re: 1995 Trek 820 to adventure commuter conversion
« Reply #33 on: February 04, 2021, 12:16:08 am »
What problem does that horrible front mech attachment system solve?

Recumbents with no derailleur post.  But only by accident.
Careful, Kim. Your sarcasm's showing...

Re: 1995 Trek 820 to adventure commuter conversion
« Reply #34 on: February 06, 2021, 12:01:33 pm »
Yeah, I'm not tempted to re-use the front mech/BB combo in the re-build!

Spindle length and chainline jibbling ahead, but I have now got permission to access my studio (=access to some parts) so I can do some hands-on experimenting with that in the not too distant future, subject to negative covid tests.

A friend has just started an MA in Museum Conservation, so we had some fun earlier this week speculating on what her professional approach to the worn patches on the frame might be! Irreversible changes are frowned upon, but needing to meet the needs of a current user adds in an interesting degree of wiggle room. Alas, she's already been allocated a case study for her coursework.

Re: 1995 Trek 820 to adventure commuter conversion
« Reply #35 on: February 06, 2021, 06:22:54 pm »
If you wax the frame it will keep the rust at bay
the slower you go the more you see

Re: 1995 Trek 820 to adventure commuter conversion
« Reply #36 on: February 07, 2021, 10:47:13 am »

Wax will almost certainly be the last stage. I'm currently pondering how abrasive to get with the stages before that: car polish seems like it might be a go-er, so long as I don't get too enthusiastic with it (I've read that bike clearcoat/paint isn't as thick as car clearcoat/paint); but before that I would like to remove some of the rust. This is going to need a fine touch, and I'm not quite sure how to approach that yet. A polishing wheel on a dremmel feels like it might be an appropriate size and roughness.

Re: 1995 Trek 820 to adventure commuter conversion
« Reply #37 on: February 07, 2021, 09:27:11 pm »
I've found these to work well with a dremel, the pack contains a large selection of 4 different grades.

https://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/B06ZY9K558/
Most of the stuff I say is true because I saw it in a dream and I don't have the presence of mind to make up lies when I'm asleep.   Bryan Andreas

Cudzoziemiec

  • Eating all the pies and drinking all the tea.
Re: 1995 Trek 820 to adventure commuter conversion
« Reply #38 on: February 07, 2021, 09:35:41 pm »
Have I said yet that "adventure commuter" is one of the best bicycle descriptions ever?
Riding a bike through a city is like navigating the collective neural pathways of a vast global mind.

Re: 1995 Trek 820 to adventure commuter conversion
« Reply #39 on: February 08, 2021, 11:37:17 am »
Mating cantilever brakes positioned for 26” to 650B wheels is not trivial.

Since the subject has (or had) been raised and since it is something that has interested me in the recent past I went back looking. Apparently there are Tektro cantis that will do this job and Paul also do brakes that will cover the adjustment range to go from 559 rims to 584. Since the choice in reasonable quality 26" road tyres is getting limited or non-existant for people who want that sort of tyre (like me when my Paselas wear out) converting to 32-584 is a serious option. The conversion is a lot more problematic if you want bigger section 584 tyres. My frame  (a CRC Brand X cheapie dating from 2008) takes 26-2" at the back. 32-584 will go in (under mudguards) but I would have my doubts about my 38mm Pari-Motos. Going up to 45 section would undoubtedly not work.

My frame is now on cable discs so for me brakes don't pose a problem (and I have already had it on 32-584 Hutchinsons which were quite a nice ride but not significantly different from 26"-1.5" Paselas, now wearing out the Paselas before changing back). There is a bit of discussion and some links for brakes/adaptors (that are not all impossibly expensive) here https://www.bikeforums.net/bicycle-mechanics/1206050-26-27-5-conversion-mountain-bike-what-available-v-brake-options-right-now.html  . I have a link to an article on converting 26" to 650b but it's on a different computer and a bit older so I can't put it here. 

Re converters for 26"-700c Mavic used to do them before 27.5 became the buzzword. The Limoges Tandem Club used them on all the club tandems (Look and EXS) to put 23-622 tyres on the bikes. Bloody stupid idea that I complained about but the brakes worked fine and nothing broke. Those were with V-brakes and I am not sure they would work with cantis since they may need the geometry of V-brakes to stay in place but in the forum article I linked to people dispute the mechanical strength of post converters and my experience was that they are OK.

This may be all irrelevant for Nicky but if her cantis are getting tired and in need of replacement then new brakes that will cover both rim sizes might be an option (if she wants to accept the limitations on tyre section imposed by 650b). It's all an expense that might not be worth the result but SJS have reasonably priced 584 rims and Kinlins aren't too pricey either (rim choice is a bit limited if you can't use disc brakes!).

Sorry to be a bit late on this :-[

Cudzoziemiec

  • Eating all the pies and drinking all the tea.
Re: 1995 Trek 820 to adventure commuter conversion
« Reply #40 on: February 08, 2021, 12:04:08 pm »
I suspect 650s might be ruled out for Nikki on various grounds such as overall cost and height! Good in general to know the options exist of course.
Riding a bike through a city is like navigating the collective neural pathways of a vast global mind.

Kim

  • Timelord
Re: 1995 Trek 820 to adventure commuter conversion
« Reply #41 on: February 08, 2021, 05:36:19 pm »
Have I said yet that "adventure commuter" is one of the best bicycle descriptions ever?

No, but I was thinking the same.
Careful, Kim. Your sarcasm's showing...

Re: 1995 Trek 820 to adventure commuter conversion
« Reply #42 on: February 08, 2021, 08:38:04 pm »
I suspect 650s might be ruled out for Nikki on various grounds such as overall cost and height! Good in general to know the options exist of course.

I am not sure that height is much of a consideration in the general run of a 90's MTB because the limitation on tyre section posed by the frame means that overall wheel heights can't differ much. The greater limitation is not being able to fit off-road rubber because that comes in sections that physically won't go in (with or without guards - and I imagine that Nikki might want to keep guards on for a commuter; I would even for a bike that would be going off road!)

Cost is a major factor as is finding rims that will take rim brakes. For me in France there are very few options without going to Velo Orange prices and they are all on the heavy side. UK buyers have probably more choice (bizarre for what is a quintessential "french" thing but there you are, the world's a barmy place)

Re: 1995 Trek 820 to adventure commuter conversion
« Reply #43 on: February 08, 2021, 09:25:42 pm »
I've found these to work well with a dremel, the pack contains a large selection of 4 different grades.

https://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/B06ZY9K558/

"80 pcs are quite enough for your daily using" :-)

I found a 1200 grit jeweller's emery stick, and I've managed to get most of the scrapes cleaned up with that.

Now I'm worried I'm living an unfulfilled life if I haven't got a use for 80 polishing wheels though!

Have I said yet that "adventure commuter" is one of the best bicycle descriptions ever?

No, but I was thinking the same.

The commute here isn't quite as adventurous as the previous one along the Birmingham & Fazeley by the Jewellery Quarter, but I like to be prepared.



I'll run it at 26" to start with to figure things out and see if it's worth investing more in. Yes to mudguards - it feels like it rarely stops raining here!

Re: 1995 Trek 820 to adventure commuter conversion
« Reply #44 on: March 06, 2021, 05:36:15 pm »

Sourcing components has been interesting...

The LBS contacted me to tell me that Madison couldn't supply the replacement crankset, but the LBS could give me a credit of £9.99 instead.

Meanwhile I'm in conversation with Madison double-checking if I really should be being charged labour and postage by the LBS as part of the recall. No, no I shouldn't. And they've got an alternative crankset (RRP~£30) they can send me if I like. And they've covered what the LBS were charging me.

Everything else has basically turned into a complete re-build, which was challenging given the lack of stock in the UK and the entirely foreseeable effects of leaving the EU. I think I'm just waiting on the obligatory SJS order now, having discovered the headset is a) damaged and b) JIS with the 27mm crown race seat.

On the plus side: the dark blue of the fade matches the colour scheme of the bridesmaids at my sister's wedding and I've found a use for the nail varnish I've not used in the several years since!







Kim

  • Timelord
Re: 1995 Trek 820 to adventure commuter conversion
« Reply #45 on: March 06, 2021, 05:37:33 pm »
That's very forward-thinking of your sister  :thumbsup:

(This week I have been mostly trying to obtain a specific Shimano freehub body.  The joys of Brexit...)
Careful, Kim. Your sarcasm's showing...

Cudzoziemiec

  • Eating all the pies and drinking all the tea.
Re: 1995 Trek 820 to adventure commuter conversion
« Reply #46 on: March 06, 2021, 06:10:39 pm »
"Nikki wearing nail varnish". No. I know each word individually but as a sentence...
Riding a bike through a city is like navigating the collective neural pathways of a vast global mind.

Re: 1995 Trek 820 to adventure commuter conversion
« Reply #47 on: March 06, 2021, 07:19:01 pm »
That's very forward-thinking of your sister  :thumbsup:

Yes! Do you think they'll mind if I take the fork into Boots to colour match the electric blue...?

"Nikki wearing nail varnish". No. I know each word individually but as a sentence...

I used to wear clear nail varnish loads when I was learning to juggle clubs and needed reinforcements.


Re: 1995 Trek 820 to adventure commuter conversion
« Reply #48 on: March 06, 2021, 07:35:32 pm »
I can juggle balls but anytime I try something "ended" it all goes to pot.

I assume there's a knack and practice is the main thing but any specific thing I should be doing?
Miles cycled 2014 = 3551.5 (Target 7300 :()
Miles cycled 2013 = 6141.4
Miles cycled 2012 = 4038.1

Kim

  • Timelord
Re: 1995 Trek 820 to adventure commuter conversion
« Reply #49 on: March 06, 2021, 09:11:10 pm »
I can juggle balls but anytime I try something "ended" it all goes to pot.

I assume there's a knack and practice is the main thing but any specific thing I should be doing?

Wearing nail varnish, apparently.


I think our collection (in an assortment of 90s Goth colours, natch) has dried up.
Careful, Kim. Your sarcasm's showing...