Author Topic: UK government may start offering financial rewards for becoming healthier  (Read 9203 times)

https://www.theguardian.com/society/2021/mar/04/uk-government-may-start-offering-financial-rewards-for-becoming-healthier

How about the reward of 'You'll feel a whole lot better and probably live longer and be less of a burden on the NHS/taxpayer'

Gattopardo

  • Lord of the sith
  • Overseaing the building of the death star
Be better (IMO) to get the populous to eat less processed food and more fruit and veg at the least 5 portions a day.

Also some of this incentive has been going on for years with certain groups in certain areas with certain long term medical conditions.

But to be my usual self, where is this money coming from? Is it another way to give gym companies money?



Jaded

  • The Codfather
  • Formerly known as Jaded
Or how about more sugar tax type stuff...
If you don't like your democracy, vote against it.

Money would be better spent on:

1: laws requiring the standards to junk and processed foods and drinks to be raised significantly,
2:  Reintroducing schemes to get people back into their local sports centres *
3:  Inscentives to walk/run/cycle more and drive less **
4:  Banning all junk food advertising
5:  Teaching children the benefits of exercise ***
6:  Invest in safe exercise facilities for people of all ages

*  for example, the tories scrapped access to free swimming for disabled people in 2010
**  reclaiming large slabs of the roads for non-motorised use would be a good and positive start
***  no, not sport, exercise.  Not everybody wants to play oafish team sports thanks.

Cudzoziemiec

  • Eating all the pies and drinking all the tea.
Two thirds of the population is overweight or obese, so that's about 40 million people. Courses for 700,000 aren't going to make much dent in that.
Riding a bike through a city is like navigating the collective neural pathways of a vast global mind.

Kim

  • Timelord
Money would be better spent on:

1: laws requiring the standards to junk and processed foods and drinks to be raised significantly,
2:  Reintroducing schemes to get people back into their local sports centres *
3:  Inscentives to walk/run/cycle more and drive less **
4:  Banning all junk food advertising
5:  Teaching children the benefits of exercise ***
6:  Invest in safe exercise facilities for people of all ages

0: Eliminating poverty.
Careful, Kim. Your sarcasm's showing...

Well, I was thinking of what could be within the fanciful realms of possibility but yes Kim is absolutely spot on.   That would help enormously.

Cudzoziemiec

  • Eating all the pies and drinking all the tea.
***  no, not sport, exercise.  Not everybody wants to play oafish team sports thanks.
Even within sport, expanding the idea of sport would enable activities that appeal to far more people. For instance, I remember one cyclist of my acquaintance saying how she had to play hockey at school and hated it, then at university she discovered rugby and loved it. Great. But she seemed bewildered that for hockey and rugby (and yes I did both at school) were different forms of the same sport: team ball sports. As are cricket, football, netball, basket ball, volleyball and handball. Running, jumping and throwing are rather different, so is swimming. If we could add (tastes of) say, kayaking, or of course cycling, etc, it would be an improvement.

But perhaps even better would be incorporating some movement into daily lives without making it deliberate exercise or sport, which most people will avoid once they leave school. At school level at happens naturally, it's called play. (So, yeah, walking to walk or even just hoovering the house... well that's fun!)
Riding a bike through a city is like navigating the collective neural pathways of a vast global mind.

Kim

  • Timelord
Shirley rugby is just hockey without the sticks?   ??? :hand:
Careful, Kim. Your sarcasm's showing...

Cudzoziemiec

  • Eating all the pies and drinking all the tea.
Or a cross between rugby and cricket?  ;)
Riding a bike through a city is like navigating the collective neural pathways of a vast global mind.

Need to be forming the lifelong movement habits at school.  Kids being driven everywhere these days doesn’t help form good habits.

Shirley rugby is just hockey without the sticks?   ??? :hand:

Football is hockey without the sticks. Rugby is an awful game where the big kids get to knock over the small kids with impunity and you have to be able to throw and catch a big heavy ball with your weedy nerd hands. Only a psychopath or a brick shithouse could like it.

Hello Cudzo's friend.

Cudzoziemiec

  • Eating all the pies and drinking all the tea.
She's a very nice woman not built like a brick shithouse and with no obvious psychopathic tendencies*. Moreover, she has developed a liking for cycling (long distance, cyclo cross and mtb) and CAEK. And she isn't on here. I think...  :)

*Yes, I know, it's the secret psychos you need to beware of.
Riding a bike through a city is like navigating the collective neural pathways of a vast global mind.

Jaded

  • The Codfather
  • Formerly known as Jaded
Need to be forming the lifelong movement habits at school.  Kids being driven everywhere these days doesn’t help form good habits.

This...
If you don't like your democracy, vote against it.

Gattopardo

  • Lord of the sith
  • Overseaing the building of the death star
Two thirds of the population is overweight or obese, so that's about 40 million people. Courses for 700,000 aren't going to make much dent in that.

700,000 is enough for a headline about no influenza.

hellymedic

  • Just do it!
I was USELESS at school sports, not for the lack of effort.
Some sport/PE teachers were HORRIBLE to those with no athletic prowess.

Activity should be promoted but team sports are horrid for those who Just Aren't Much Good.

The government is in bed with Big Sport and Big Food and they don't really help people form heathy habits.

Gattopardo

  • Lord of the sith
  • Overseaing the building of the death star
I was USELESS at school sports, not for the lack of effort.
Some sport/PE teachers were HORRIBLE to those with no athletic prowess.

Activity should be promoted but team sports are horrid for those who Just Aren't Much Good.

The government is in bed with Big Sport and Big Food and they don't really help people form heathy habits.

Those who can't teach, and those that can't teach teach PE.

I was USELESS at school sports, not for the lack of effort.
Some sport/PE teachers were HORRIBLE to those with no athletic prowess.

Activity should be promoted but team sports are horrid for those who Just Aren't Much Good.


School PE pretty much put me off exercise altogether, and it wasn't until my 30s that I did any sort of deliberate exercise (I've always walked to get around, though).

Active travel. Getting people out of their cars for ridiculously short journeys. That's what needs to be supported and promoted - making activity part of everyday life, with the added benefit of making the world a cleaner, healthier place at the same time.

Money would be better spent on:

1: laws requiring the standards to junk and processed foods and drinks to be raised significantly,
2:  Reintroducing schemes to get people back into their local sports centres *
3:  Inscentives to walk/run/cycle more and drive less **
4:  Banning all junk food advertising
5:  Teaching children the benefits of exercise ***
6:  Invest in safe exercise facilities for people of all ages

0: Eliminating poverty.

I would add cooking/nutrition - but for home, not commercial

Not all PE teachers are bad.
I had a good one at my senior school; he encouraged exercise at any level, he introduced a huge range of games, exercise and sport. Found something for everyone.
I taught PE/games part time for a few years and have letters from students proclaiming it their favourite lesson (admittedly at the start I utterly screwed up and kids hated it). My lesson slot was just prior to lunchtime, and multiple times I had a class refusing to go to lunch; they wanted to carry on with the lesson.

On PB's point; in the Cam canoe club there are a couple of juniors who are on the national development squad - so in a select group of about 70 nationwide.
They are poor at team sports, so their schools mark them as 'not good at sport'.  :facepalm:

These are kids with a VO2 Max like a TDF cyclist, who train every day of the week, absolutely live to race.
<i>Marmite slave</i>

With two thirds of our population overweight(and we are one of the wealthiest nations) it is not directly attributable to poverty but it certainly magnifies things. A recent ad hoc survey in class of 35 in a school in a deprived area found only 1 pupil recalled a meal ever being prepared entirely from raw ingredients and the most common breakfast that day was a packet of crisps. The U.K. consumes more ready meals the the whole of the combined EU. I think exercising our way out of this problem is not going to succeed.

It rather matters how the wealth is distributed.   We might be a wealthy nation but relative to that we are not a wealthy population. 

You only have to look at the need for in work benefits for literally millions, rent arrears, the dire state that so many disabled people are forced to live in and the numbers of foodbank users to realise that the wealth is very unevenly distributed.

fboab

  • It's a fecking serious business, riding a bike
There is a direct correlation between low income and obesity- cheap shit is cheaper and shittier. Foodbanks are not (can not) deal with fresh food.
It's a very well known fact that you cannot out-exercise a bad diet.

The other thing is, PE now is not what it was when I was at school. Joe Wicks and Yoga.
TSS is not Total Sex Score, Chris!

ian

  • feat. Undead Jess & Finestre, Queen of Hell
It's clear that we have to do something, at this rate we'll all be too fat to run away from the rising sea levels. To be more serious, in about twenty years it'll cost the NHS more than we're currently willing to pay, and we'll have a generation with shorter, less healthy life spans than their parents. And it's all addressable.

It's not a unitary problem, of course. Poorer people will struggle with access to decent food, but really, what are they going to do with an organic veg box? I read some interesting articles about 'bandwidth scarcity' which actually makes a lot of sense – if you've got a life where you spend all your days worrying about low-level stuff, how to a pay bill, will you get enough hours next week, you don't get home and think let's plan a meal. No, you want to sit in front of the TV and shovel breaded chicken-derived lumps into your mouth. That's a more significant social change in which we free people from constant, abrading worry. Governments are invested in the language of hard-works and self-declared strivers, so I can't see that happening.

Richer people get to splurge to excess, because, why not? Obesity is generally a gradual thing. You don't eat a single packet of biscuits, look down and think, fuck where did my feet go? By the time a bloke looks down and can't see his pole d'amour because someone has put a fleshy Uluru in the way (I'll sure the ladies have a similar moment of horror), it's too late, for many it's a defeat and they may as well carry on. It's easier to stay at a reasonable weight than lose weight to get there.

So, yeah, big changes. At the social level, addressing a lifestyle where we drive everywhere, removing constant worry, standing up to food industry and supermarkets, making exercise facilities cheap and available to all (and invest in them, everyone should have reasonable, non-driving access to a sports/leisure centre), value and maintain parks and outdoor facilities, improve access to sports and exercise at school.*

To do this would significant political will, of course. Telling people to get out of their cars, moving away from divisive language and policies, actually funding things that don't benefit their friends in industry, or tailoring laws so as to not trouble them too much, ending their obsequiousness to supermarkets because they might provide a few minimum-wage jobs.

*yeah, like everyone else, I was put off sport and exercise for life. Good to hear it might have improved. It was fucking awful in my day.
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It rather matters how the wealth is distributed.   We might be a wealthy nation but relative to that we are not a wealthy population. 

You only have to look at the need for in work benefits for literally millions, rent arrears, the dire state that so many disabled people are forced to live in and the numbers of foodbank users to realise that the wealth is very unevenly distributed.
It might be very uneven and it is shocking that 3% of the population have benefited from a food bank in the last year but that cannot explain 66% being overweight even if incidence is much higher in that group. Regarding the 66% overall, the percentage varies from 60% in the least deprived areas to 70% in the most deprived.