Author Topic: Garden shed  (Read 1412 times)

Garden shed
« on: April 12, 2021, 02:07:36 pm »
I want to get a garden shed.  The garage is full, mostly with bikes, but other stuff as well.  A part of the garden has been identified and is in the process of being cleared. 

I've done some initial searches for sheds but there are millions of options and I can't tell what is the best and which will quickly fall apart. 

If I had enough time I'd love to build it myself but that is unlikely so I'll most likely get some form of kit.

Any advice on what is best?

LittleWheelsandBig

  • Whimsy Rider
Re: Garden shed
« Reply #1 on: April 12, 2021, 02:34:06 pm »
We are looking at this, for similar reasons. We will probably overcapitalise with electric power, insulation and reinforced concrete slab. I don’t like doing bike maintenance in the cold.
Wheel meet again, don't know where, don't know when...

Re: Garden shed
« Reply #2 on: April 12, 2021, 02:38:46 pm »
Without stating the obvs, buy directly from the manufacturer, rather than your local garden centre.
When I bought mine, I did so from a manufacturer near Brands Hatch Racing Circuit ( I don't think they're there any longer). Even with a delivery charge of £20.00, I was still saving about a third off the prices at my local garden centres.
18 years later, without any preservation, the shed is still standing, watertight, and generally doing its job.

ETA - I've just checked, they are The Shed Factory and they have re-located to Sevenoaks.
ETFA - I've just spoken to them, Frank, and they've said that they'll deliver up your way - so long as its inside the perimeter of the M25.

Tim Hall

  • Victoria is my queen
Re: Garden shed
« Reply #3 on: April 12, 2021, 03:06:30 pm »
<watching with interest>

There are two ways you can get exercise out of a bicycle: you can
"overhaul" it, or you can ride it.  (Jerome K Jerome)

hellymedic

  • Just do it!
Re: Garden shed
« Reply #4 on: April 12, 2021, 03:19:33 pm »
There are six sheds of some description chez nous.
Two were cheap, pitched roof, wooden affairs from a DIY outlet, one is a prefab garage, one's a 'summer house; which was here when I bought the house and the other two are D's self-built observatory constructions.

The roofing felt is cheap and nasty so doesn't last long. Be prepared to redo this soon.

Decide on the size you want. Basic sheds are on sale from all the garden/DIY outlets and you can shop around online.

Make sure the shed stands on something really sturdy and level. Consider how you'll stop water entering from ground level and whether it's worth fitting gutters to channel rain away.

Remember maintaining wooden sheds needs quite a lot of work!

Re: Garden shed
« Reply #5 on: April 12, 2021, 03:24:26 pm »

The roofing felt is cheap and nasty so doesn't last long. Be prepared to redo this soon.




Or if possible upgrade at time of purchase. Seems to be the way they save a few quid by using poor quality felt

Re: Garden shed
« Reply #6 on: April 12, 2021, 03:26:36 pm »
<snippety-snip>
Remember maintaining wooden sheds needs quite a lot of work!
On the contrary - it needn't be so.
My shed is standing on a concrete base, the floor timbers are tanalised, with stainless mesh between them to keep out the wildlife.
The only maintenance I've carried out in the last 18 years is I've fitted a padlock hasp and some internal battery lights.
Everything is still square, upright and waterproof.

The roofing felt is cheap and nasty so doesn't last long. Be prepared to redo this soon.
Or if possible upgrade at time of purchase. Seems to be the way they save a few quid by using poor quality felt

This is what I did.

hellymedic

  • Just do it!
Re: Garden shed
« Reply #7 on: April 12, 2021, 03:37:30 pm »
I forgot about the wildlife! D's data cables seemed to make good mouse food...

Re: Garden shed
« Reply #8 on: April 12, 2021, 03:42:54 pm »
I believe Jurek has previous with wildlife...... :D
Not fast & rarely furious

tweeting occasional in(s)anities as andrewxclark

Re: Garden shed
« Reply #9 on: April 12, 2021, 03:45:50 pm »
I forgot about the wildlife! D's data cables seemed to make good mouse food...
The sort of stainless mesh strip which brickies/plasterers use for finishing vulnerable edges is cheap and ideal for this sort of application. Don't make the mistake of using galvenised. It'll rust on the untreated ends where you have cut it, as well as the places where the fixing screws have scratched off the finish.

MikeFromLFE

  • Previously known as Millimole
Re: Garden shed
« Reply #10 on: April 12, 2021, 04:00:57 pm »
I've recently asked a similar question on an allotment forum (without a real answer to report back on).
There was a consensus that metal sheds are generally a bad idea due to condensation, although some did suggest that a proper base might be an answer (I'm sceptical). Metal sheds, like their plastic cousins do warp which makes them a poor long-term solution - and being light they need proper anchorage.
An interesting allotment cheapskate solution was to get a cheap / free greenhouse and use that as a frame for wood walls & roof.

I'm blessed with three allotment sheds, none of them are fit for purpose, each hopeless in its own delightful way.
Too many angry people - breathe & relax.

Re: Garden shed
« Reply #11 on: April 12, 2021, 04:03:38 pm »
I've recently asked a similar question on an allotment forum (without a real answer to report back on).
There was a consensus that metal sheds are generally a bad idea due to condensation, although some did suggest that a proper base might be an answer (I'm sceptical). Metal sheds, like their plastic cousins do warp which makes them a poor long-term solution - and being light they need proper anchorage.
An interesting allotment cheapskate solution was to get a cheap / free greenhouse and use that as a frame for wood walls & roof.

I'm blessed with three allotment sheds, none of them are fit for purpose, each hopeless in its own delightful way.
See Ham (OTP) for the construction of allotment sheds.

Re: Garden shed
« Reply #12 on: April 12, 2021, 04:13:58 pm »
For a shed to store cycles I went to a local saw mills.  The sort of places that supply wooden stables, garages etc.  I wanted approx 8 by 6 with no windows and an offset door that is wider than usual, as well as something stout.  The shiplap sides (don't even think about tongue and groove) are half inch thick and the corner uprights are 4 by 4 inches.  That was 16 years ago, and apart from reroofing when the felt failed after 12 years I have had no issues.  I used the corrugated Onduline from Wickes (and others) when I replaced the felt - very satisfying to work with.  If I were specifying a new custom shed I would specify that out of preference.

robgul

  • Cycle:End-to-End webmaster
  • cyclist, Cytech accredited mechanic & woodworker
    • Cycle:End-to-End
Re: Garden shed
« Reply #13 on: April 12, 2021, 04:22:37 pm »
My wife bought a shiplap Tiger Shed https://www.tigersheds.com/ for her allotment (8 x 6, pent roof IIRC) - apart from the bright orange colour (it's now been painted back with Cuprinol Garden Shades Ash Black) it's pretty good quality - but, being a bit of a woodworker:

1 We laid paving slabs level for the base
2 I made a "plinth" from 3 x 2 treated timber to mount the floor onto, getting it off the ground.
3 The whole thing is DIY assembly and they supply a bag of nails - I drilled and screwed it together . . . partly for strength and partly if she gave up the allotment we could take it apart easily.
4 The roofing felt supplied wasn't brilliant - I laid that in strips the short way (tacked to the roof with alloy nails) and then with better quality felt fitted another layer, lapped, on the long direction.  The edges of the second layer were turned over the roof edge and fixed with treated battens screwed on.

Subsequently I've made a plywood panel that fits over the windows (inside) with a rail at the bottom and some wooden turnbuckles at the top - partly to stop the light coming in and also prevent people seeing what's inside.

For all that - I wouldn't very happy to store bikes of any value in a wooden shed as, even with insulation, it's going to be damp and of course vulnerable to theft.
Cycle:End-to-End     Resources and inspiration for the great adventure!
HoE Cycling Club

Re: Garden shed
« Reply #14 on: April 12, 2021, 04:25:33 pm »
I've recently asked a similar question on an allotment forum (without a real answer to report back on).
There was a consensus that metal sheds are generally a bad idea due to condensation, although some did suggest that a proper base might be an answer (I'm sceptical). Metal sheds, like their plastic cousins do warp which makes them a poor long-term solution - and being light they need proper anchorage.
An interesting allotment cheapskate solution was to get a cheap / free greenhouse and use that as a frame for wood walls & roof.

I'm blessed with three allotment sheds, none of them are fit for purpose, each hopeless in its own delightful way.
See Ham (OTP) for the construction of allotment sheds.

Aye. Pallets. This link should show you how I did it https://photos.app.goo.gl/burL7MQTfXUZLGiR8 - best part of 2 years down the line and i am very happy with it, the pallet construction is particularly suited for storage. Very quick and easy to build, whole thing probably took me two days, maybe slightly more cladding and making the door. Base is heavy slabs around the outside, with pad stones to lift the pallets off ground level to avoid rot, clad down over the edge so no gaps.

MikeFromLFE

  • Previously known as Millimole
Re: Garden shed
« Reply #15 on: April 12, 2021, 04:54:30 pm »
Many thanks Ham - food for thought
Too many angry people - breathe & relax.

Re: Garden shed
« Reply #16 on: April 12, 2021, 05:31:58 pm »
In case you're interested, the construction process went something like this:

1 - Decide on the rough dimensions: length needed to be to store 8ft canes.
2 - Assemble the pallet cohort to finalise the size. I identified some heavier ones to act as the doorway.
3 - Flatten ground, lay the slabs (OK, strictly speaking I did this before 2 )
4 - stand the first corner square. As you are using packing underneath, minor adjustments in level can easily be accommodated
5 - build the sides, cut down and re-make pallets to the right height. A mattock is your friend for this
6 - cut the angle on the sides. I added effectively a wall plate around the top, and a couple of binders side to side. CLS timber worked perfectly for this
7 - Make up the doorway, as I said I used heavyweight pallets for this
8 - Roof on
9 - Clad the outside, I wanted to re-use wood, but ended up buying featheredge. You will need to add spacers to keep a flat surface, this is more pallet wood
10 - a couple of brackets from the bottom of the pallets onto the slabs to locate firmly

redshift

  • High Priestess of wires
    • redshift home
Re: Garden shed
« Reply #17 on: April 12, 2021, 05:36:31 pm »
When we got the workshop, instead of a shed it's actually a 14'x12' concrete sectional garage but has a 4' personnel door.  Local agent built the base, manufacturer put the building together once the base was cured, and then the local agent returned to put the sealing fillet down.  After that it was down to us - lined and insulated, power etc.  We still have two 8'x6' wooden sheds as well, each on a homemade concrete base. One is over 30 years old, the other is about 25.  They've both had new roof coverings (felt) at least twice - I know this because I'm the one who gets to climb on the shed to finish it!  Concrete bases do seem to make a difference to the longevity, but as I get older there's going to come a time when I can't do the climbing.

My late father had a shed built which was basically the same multilayer stuff they make industrial units from - sections of metal filled with something like Kingspan or Celotex, but it wasn't as good as our workshop.  Mind you, it was pretty much maintenance-free.

If you're time-poor (as we were at the time) then getting someone else to build it is reasonable.  If you have the time, then building it yourself will always mean you end up with exactly what you want.
L
:)
Windcheetah No. 176
The all-round entertainer gets quite arsey,
They won't translate his lame shit into Farsi
Somehow to let it go would be more classy…

frankly frankie

  • I kid you not
    • Fuchsiaphile
Re: Garden shed
« Reply #18 on: April 12, 2021, 06:31:45 pm »
I'd need a cowboy builder to replace my 35 yo summer house (elongated octagonal) because its located right in the corner of the garden and 'name' shed suppliers don't like that, they want easy working space all round.
So if replacing it myself (I may yet have to) I'd look at a log-cabin style construction because the individual components are easier to manage, physically, than having to heft 6x6 panels around.

I re-roofed it last year during lockdown 1 using felt shingles - this sort of thing (Amazon link) - and they are really easy to use and the end result looks terrific still one year on.  You're working with small sheets of about 1m x 1/2m each representing 4 'tiles' - but even so roof coverage was really quick and the complex octagonal shape easy to deal with, and no struggling with unwieldy rolls of felt.  Just rather a lot of nails and noise pollution for the neighbours!  (They repay with interest.)
you only live but once, and when you're dead you're done, so let the good times roll

Re: Garden shed
« Reply #19 on: April 12, 2021, 07:54:22 pm »
I got my main shed from https://www.waltons.co.uk/garden-sheds/wooden-sheds, a "high security" shiplap built one, about 13 years ago. The wood is starting to get dodgy in places, due to shrinkage it appears, rather than damp - the over laps are warping a bit, and failing in places. I covered the roof with some old corrugated metal sheets off another garage, laid the "wrong" way around for ease, and it's been very waterproof since ;)


My other shed, which is smaller and houses garden junk and the bins, I built myself out of pressure treated shiplap and chunky framing, topped with the 15/20 year felt. It had to fit a very specific area which is straight at the front, but goes away at the back, so it was an interesting "wonky" design for my first ever build, but it came out OK I think. No sign of trouble a couple of years on :)
Build post here, if interested: https://www.pistonheads.com/gassing/topic.asp?h=0&f=&t=1812235

I'd say you can build a MUCH better shed for your money if you start from scratch at your local wood mill, but it does take a few evenings getting the bits ready, followed by a long day putting together. Also, buy a sliding compound mitre chop saw - worth its (considerable) weight on a project like this.
Back in the saddle :)

Re: Garden shed
« Reply #20 on: April 12, 2021, 10:34:49 pm »
Is the plan to move the bikes from the garage? There have been various previous discussions. I've not found condensation a problem over a number of years. This thread and this one cover metal sheds in particular.

Re: Garden shed
« Reply #21 on: April 12, 2021, 10:45:42 pm »
If building your own..
Add a OSB anti racking layer. Makes it a bit more secure as well.

Tim Hall

  • Victoria is my queen
Re: Garden shed
« Reply #22 on: April 12, 2021, 11:33:17 pm »
If building your own..
Add a OSB anti racking layer. Makes it a bit more secure as well.
OSB I understand. What is anti racking?
There are two ways you can get exercise out of a bicycle: you can
"overhaul" it, or you can ride it.  (Jerome K Jerome)

Re: Garden shed
« Reply #23 on: April 13, 2021, 07:44:23 am »
I didn't know either so I googled it and got this:

What is racking in a wall?
Racking is the top of the wall being forced in one direction while the bottom is held stationary or is forced in the other. Door and window corners are particularly vulnerable to these racking shear forces.


Makes sense

robgul

  • Cycle:End-to-End webmaster
  • cyclist, Cytech accredited mechanic & woodworker
    • Cycle:End-to-End
Re: Garden shed
« Reply #24 on: April 13, 2021, 07:45:23 am »
If building your own..
Add a OSB anti racking layer. Makes it a bit more secure as well.
OSB I understand. What is anti racking?

"racking" is when a structure sheers out of square - imagine a rack with 4 uprights and 4 shelves - it should be square with the uprights vertical - BUT could be pushed to one side and become rhomboid shaped.   

Fixing sheets of OSB the frame of the shed will keep it "square" if there's any movement.  [And the OSB will add strength too - and could sandwich insulation between it and the shed wall.
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