Author Topic: Increase in dog bites during the pandemic.  (Read 869 times)

Increase in dog bites during the pandemic.
« on: April 15, 2021, 09:42:42 am »
https://www.theguardian.com/lifeandstyle/2021/apr/15/dog-bite-britain-the-problem-with-the-pandemic-puppy-explosion


"the lack of proper training or socialisation has led to a growing danger of attacks".


How long before the rescue centres are full of unwanted dogs again ?  :(
Not fast & rarely furious

tweeting occasional in(s)anities as andrewxclark

ian

  • feat. Undead Jess & Finestre, Queen of Hell
Re: Increase in dog bites during the pandemic.
« Reply #1 on: April 15, 2021, 06:51:54 pm »
There's certainly an uptick in the number of unrestrained and mostly out-of-control dogs that we encounter on walks, mostly little things 'being friendly' though that's perhaps more a reflection of people's exercise patterns than new dogs. And certainly much more carefully bagged up dog shit, that perennial mystery of the countryside. Wandering through Mickleham Downs a few weeks back and we passed a tree that must have had a dozen, identical bags of presumably dog shit, so the same person was making it a regular part of their walk. Why, I have no idea.
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Wowbagger

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Re: Increase in dog bites during the pandemic.
« Reply #2 on: April 15, 2021, 09:17:35 pm »
A week or so ago I was on a 5-ish mile walk involving a lot of normally-deserted sea wall. I was in the last mile when a couple with two dogs came towards me - both small terrier types. One of the dogs barked and barked at me, and several times ran around me to approach from behind, with the clear intention of biting my ankles. Each time I turned round and faced it and it backed off. The sodding owners did nothing.
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ian

  • feat. Undead Jess & Finestre, Queen of Hell
Re: Increase in dog bites during the pandemic.
« Reply #3 on: April 15, 2021, 10:00:48 pm »
I did get freaked out on Sunday, taking a singular stroll and I hear something behind me, turned to see two large German shepherds. They came up and sniffed me and then ran away. I guess it's my cologne. Didn't see any owner. Possibly they were taking themselves for a walk.
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Feanor

  • It's mostly downhill from here.
Re: Increase in dog bites during the pandemic.
« Reply #4 on: April 15, 2021, 10:08:42 pm »
Well, yes: I got chomped on a run a couple of days ago, as recounted in another thread.
First dog-chomp I've had since I were a newspaper-delivery kid in my teens.

But I don't think it was Covid-related; the party involved looked like they were long-term doggy types.

As I said in the other thread:
"I would describe the mutt as 'over-excitable' rather then 'malicious'. The sight of a running creature seems to trigger something a bit primeval in their branez. Whether as potential prey, or as a fun running partner is not always clear."

But yes, now they know the mutt has chomped someone, then need to reel it in somewhat.

ian

  • feat. Undead Jess & Finestre, Queen of Hell
Re: Increase in dog bites during the pandemic.
« Reply #5 on: April 16, 2021, 10:08:16 am »
I don't like it, but I mostly grin and bear the canine attempts to 'be friendly' and their owners dither to bring them under control. With the smaller ones, I'm sometimes tempted to see how far I can kick them. We did have a go at a woman with a big german shepherd that was really barking and growling at us and whose advice 'was to stand still, he won't hurt you.' And another near Ranmore, a more generic mutt was running around behind us trying to nip us, usual ineffectual owners. I appreciate it was 'playing' but it wasn't a game we wanted to play. Again we got the 'stand still and he won't chase you.' No.

If you can't control your dog, if you can't guarantee it will come back on command, it shouldn't be off the leash in a public place. Don't make excuses, you know if you can control your dog or not.
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citoyen

  • Occasionally rides a bike
Re: Increase in dog bites during the pandemic.
« Reply #6 on: April 26, 2021, 09:44:08 am »
As I said in the other thread:
"I would describe the mutt as 'over-excitable' rather then 'malicious'. The sight of a running creature seems to trigger something a bit primeval in their branez. Whether as potential prey, or as a fun running partner is not always clear."

I'm pretty certain it's anxiety in the case of my dog.

I was walking him along the prom the other day. He was having a little sit down, as he likes to do sometimes. A runner coming by made the absolute minimum sideways movement to get past us, practically brushing my shoulder (even though there was plenty of room for him to give us a much wider berth). Of course, the dog leapt up and went for his ankles. Would have served the idiot right if he'd got a bite.

I don't like it either, but at least I have the mental capacity to process that it's just rudeness, not a threat.

If I'm able to anticipate the situation, I can usually take measures to keep him calm. But in this instance, I wasn't anticipating the runner being such a twat.
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Re: Increase in dog bites during the pandemic.
« Reply #7 on: May 05, 2021, 07:44:54 am »
Casual observation suggests there's also been a massive uptick in the number of inbred designer dogs that can't breathe properly.  It's easy money for puppy farms and chavs with an unspayed bitch - a litter of the right sort of puppies can be worth £30k.

If you must get a pedigree dog, get a border terrier.  They're even cheaper to insure than mongrels, because they are so robust.
And Darkness and Decay and the Coronavirus held illimitable dominion over all.

woollypigs

  • Mr Peli
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Re: Increase in dog bites during the pandemic.
« Reply #8 on: May 05, 2021, 08:29:59 am »
There's also an uptake to dogs getting stolen. Around here there is reports of the thieves taking them from within the house and even cutting the leads while the owner is holding it. Then there is reports that the thieves have taken out the chips.


As Andrewc said. it will be long before these "designer" dogs ends up at the rescue centres :( Sadly people would rather pay £500+ for a dog that is "in" at the moment, from a breeder that don't give you any support/help/training. Than go to a rescue centre that will give you all that support and cost less than a "designer - https://www.dogstrust.org.uk/rehoming/how-to-adopt/
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Re: Increase in dog bites during the pandemic.
« Reply #9 on: May 05, 2021, 09:49:07 am »
There's also been a huge uptick in pavement turds.  The new owners, if they walk their dogs at all (my neighbour walks his french bulldog about once a fortnight) don't pick them up.  It's like the 1970s again.
And Darkness and Decay and the Coronavirus held illimitable dominion over all.

Re: Increase in dog bites during the pandemic.
« Reply #10 on: May 05, 2021, 10:05:30 am »
There's also an uptake to dogs getting stolen. Around here there is reports of the thieves taking them from within the house and even cutting the leads while the owner is holding it. Then there is reports that the thieves have taken out the chips.


As Andrewc said. it will be long before these "designer" dogs ends up at the rescue centres :( Sadly people would rather pay £500+ for a dog that is "in" at the moment, from a breeder that don't give you any support/help/training. Than go to a rescue centre that will give you all that support and cost less than a "designer - https://www.dogstrust.org.uk/rehoming/how-to-adopt/
Just about every dog on the dogstrust comes with a note saying 'Will need a garden with a 6ft fence'.

Either they are being incredibly cautious or they are saying 'may run away if any possibility'.

"will chase small animals" "Needs rural location"
What do they think exists in a rural location?  We are surrounded by fields full of lambs. Rural location.
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Re: Increase in dog bites during the pandemic.
« Reply #11 on: May 05, 2021, 10:13:15 am »
Anecdotally, I was bitten by a dog last October for the first time as an adult so maybe something in this  ;)

The owner excused herself by saying it was a rescue dog she'd only had a few weeks.  I replied that was all the more reason to be careful around people.  She was so defensive and downright rude I notified the authorities, who paid her a visit.

Re: Increase in dog bites during the pandemic.
« Reply #12 on: May 05, 2021, 11:24:41 am »
As Andrewc said. it will be long before these "designer" dogs ends up at the rescue centres :( Sadly people would rather pay £500+ for a dog that is "in" at the moment, from a breeder that don't give you any support/help/training. Than go to a rescue centre that will give you all that support and cost less than a "designer - https://www.dogstrust.org.uk/rehoming/how-to-adopt/

£500 for a designer dog, that's so 2019. A bog standard lab or spaniel will cost you £2000 at the moment. A friend is looking for a new dog after their old dog died last year, they have been amazed at the prices being charged at the moment.  And yes they have considered rescue dogs but the local rescues only seem to have bulldogs and crosses thereof at the moment and they want something they don't have to worry about around the grand kids (ex farmer with wide experience of owning dogs from alsatians, dobermans, sheepdogs through dalamatians and spaniels, yes any dog can be dangerous but spaniels and labs are usually pretty bomb proof).
I think you'll find it's a bit more complicated than that.

Re: Increase in dog bites during the pandemic.
« Reply #13 on: May 05, 2021, 11:37:50 am »
I think a lot of dogs end up at rescue places because the initial owners can't be bothered dealing with behavioural or health issues.  It's how my parents ended up with a gluten intolerant rottweiler  who costs a fortune to feed. 
Not fast & rarely furious

tweeting occasional in(s)anities as andrewxclark

Re: Increase in dog bites during the pandemic.
« Reply #14 on: May 05, 2021, 11:43:52 am »
My parents got a Yorkie which (a) had been used as a puppy farm stud and (b) had never been house-trained.  He's a good dog now, but took a LOT of work.

In the cat world, there is a predominance of female cats in adoption centres.  They tend to be less sociable and more inclined to lash out with their claws than male cats.
And Darkness and Decay and the Coronavirus held illimitable dominion over all.

Re: Increase in dog bites during the pandemic.
« Reply #15 on: May 05, 2021, 11:45:44 am »
Our Ex racer greyhound was sub £300 to rehome including being deactivated shall we say

He is good as gold but as he was trained to chase things he doesn't go off lead and wears a muzzle. It does piss us off when people assume he is aggressive because of this. He may lean on you for a fuss but thats about it although goes barmy with me

Not the sort of dog to get for massive hikes but he is a wonderful family pet and my youngish kids adore him

Regulator

  • That's Councillor Regulator to you...
Re: Increase in dog bites during the pandemic.
« Reply #16 on: May 05, 2021, 03:14:21 pm »
Jack cost us £150 from the Wood Green rescue centre near Huntingdon - that included the cost of having his knackers removed (a condition of adoption).

I recall there being a large number of Staffies in the centre, as people didn't train them and couldn't handle them.  As and when Jack shuffles off this mortal coil, we could consider another rescue - but perhaps a bigger dog this time.

We were told Jack was an escape artist, chased sheep and chased cyclists.  None of that was true.

He is a typical terrier though.  You just need to know how to manage them.
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barakta

  • Bastard lovechild of Yomiko Readman and Johnny 5
Re: Increase in dog bites during the pandemic.
« Reply #17 on: May 05, 2021, 03:24:38 pm »
I know of guide dog owners who have had people try to steal their guide dog while they were out, which is a tad terrifying.

Re: Increase in dog bites during the pandemic.
« Reply #18 on: May 05, 2021, 03:43:10 pm »
I know of guide dog owners who have had people try to steal their guide dog while they were out, which is a tad terrifying.

 :o and whats more  ??? how do some people live with themselves.
I think you'll find it's a bit more complicated than that.

Re: Increase in dog bites during the pandemic.
« Reply #19 on: May 05, 2021, 03:51:41 pm »
Jack got us £150 from the Wood Green rescue centre near Huntingdon - that included the cost of having his knackers removed (a condition of adoption).

I recall there being a large number of Staffies in the centre, as people didn't train them and couldn't handle them.  As and when Jack shuffles off this mortal coil, we could consider another rescue - but perhaps a bigger dog this time.

We were told Jack was an escape artist, chased sheep and chased cyclists.  None of that was true.

He is a typical terrier though.  You just need to know how to manage them.
There's a dedicated Staffie rescue charity shop in Bridgnorth.  They are generally quite amiable creatures that defy chavs' attempts to turn them into "land sharks". 
And Darkness and Decay and the Coronavirus held illimitable dominion over all.

barakta

  • Bastard lovechild of Yomiko Readman and Johnny 5
Re: Increase in dog bites during the pandemic.
« Reply #20 on: May 05, 2021, 04:55:28 pm »
My former boss adopted a Staffie cross and because the family knew how to look after dogs she's done great. They recognised when she became anxious and needy (she was somewhat neglected by previous family owners who had a baby) and they worked with that. They're a walking family so the dog is walked very well every day a few times a day AND taken out for longer walks at weekends or days off. If the dog gets anxious, an adult takes her away from the source of anxiety...

But it's an investment and they recognise that sometimes that disrupts their lives to deal with doggie needs. Quelle surprise...

Kim

  • Timelord
Re: Increase in dog bites during the pandemic.
« Reply #21 on: May 05, 2021, 06:02:38 pm »
There's a dedicated Staffie rescue charity shop in Bridgnorth.  They are generally quite amiable creatures that defy chavs' attempts to turn them into "land sharks".

Amusing double-take here, on account of being used to denziens of the Scary Devil Monastery using the term "land shark" as a euphemism for 'lawyer'.
Careful, Kim. Your sarcasm's showing...