Author Topic: Google account birthday request  (Read 2326 times)

hellymedic

  • Just do it!
Re: Google account birthday request
« Reply #75 on: 22 April, 2021, 10:06:39 pm »
It is MUCH more believable that I have a birthdate 5 months ahead of my arrival.

A BMI of umpteen thousand is obvious rubbish. No way could anybody guess an adult's month of birth correctly.

Cudzoziemiec

  • Eating all the pies and drinking all the tea.
Re: Google account birthday request
« Reply #76 on: 23 April, 2021, 08:17:42 am »
Sounds like a classic case of doctor's handwriting!
Riding a bike through a city is like navigating the collective neural pathways of a vast global mind.

citoyen

  • Occasionally rides a bike
Re: Google account birthday request
« Reply #77 on: 23 April, 2021, 09:39:18 am »
This is not as bad as the story that did the rounds recently of someone who was called in to the GP as an emergency obesity case. After some investigation, it emerged that the patient's height had been measured in metres, but recorded in centimetres, or some-such, resulting in a BMI in the 28,000 region.

It wasn't the obesity per se that they called him in for - the anomaly only came to light because he was invited in for a vaccine, which he queried due to being young, fit and healthy, and not a key worker.
"The future's all yours, you lousy bicycles."

Re: Google account birthday request
« Reply #78 on: 23 April, 2021, 05:57:51 pm »
That was it. Thanks.

Morat

  • I tried to HTFU but something went ping :(
Re: Google account birthday request
« Reply #79 on: 23 April, 2021, 07:57:10 pm »
I wouldn't mind so much, but they also often can't get 12 am/pm correct.
Nobody can. Neither of them can be correct. As Wikipedia says:
Quote
It is not always clear what times "12:00 a.m." and "12:00 p.m." denote. From the Latin words meridies (midday), ante (before) and post (after), the term ante meridiem (a.m.) means before midday and post meridiem (p.m.) means after midday. Since "noon" (midday, meridies (m.)) is neither before nor after itself, the terms a.m. and p.m. do not apply.[2] Although "12 m." was suggested as a way to indicate noon, this is seldom done[20] and also does not resolve the question of how to indicate midnight.

The American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language states "By convention, 12 AM denotes midnight and 12 PM denotes noon. Because of the potential for confusion, it is advisable to use 12 noon and 12 midnight."[24]

E. G. Richards in his book Mapping Time provided a diagram in which 12 a.m. means noon and 12 p.m. means midnight.[25]

The style manual of the United States Government Printing Office used 12 a.m. for noon and 12 p.m. for midnight until its 2008 edition, when it reversed these designations[17][18] and then retained that change in its 2016 revision.[26]

Many U.S. style guides, and NIST's "Frequently asked questions (FAQ)" web page,[2] recommend that it is clearest if one refers to "noon" or "12:00 noon" and "midnight" or "12:00 midnight" (rather than to "12:00 p.m." and "12:00 a.m."). The NIST website states that "12 a.m. and 12 p.m. are ambiguous and should not be used."

The Associated Press Stylebook specifies that midnight "is part of the day that is ending, not the one that is beginning."[23]

The Canadian Press Stylebook[21] says, "write noon or midnight, not 12 noon or 12 midnight." Phrases such as "12 a.m." and "12 p.m." are not mentioned at all. Britain's National Physical Laboratory "FAQ-Time" web page[22] states "In cases where the context cannot be relied upon to place a particular event, the pair of days straddling midnight can be quoted"; also "the terms 12 a.m. and 12 p.m. should be avoided."

Likewise, some U.S. style guides recommend either clarifying "midnight" with other context clues, such as specifying the two dates between which it falls, or not referring to the term at all. For an example of the latter method, "midnight" is replaced with "11:59 p.m." for the end of a day or "12:01 a.m." for the start of a day. That has become common in the United States in legal contracts and for airplane, bus, or train schedules, though some schedules use other conventions. Occasionally, when trains run at regular intervals, the pattern may be broken at midnight by displacing the midnight departure one or more minutes, such as to 11:59 p.m. or 12:01 a.m.[27]
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/12-hour_clock#:~:text=The%20American%20Heritage%20Dictionary%20of,12%20noon%20and%2012%20midnight."

Similarly, is midnight 00:00 or 24:00? It's a different case, because both are correct rather than neither, and more importantly because whichever you use, it's not confusing (except to Americans).

For the UK forces, there is no midnight. You can plan H hour for 2359 or 0001 but never 0000 because it has been deemed non-existant.
Tandem Stoker, CX bike abuser (slicks and tarmac) and owner of a sadly neglected MTB.

hellymedic

  • Just do it!
Re: Google account birthday request
« Reply #80 on: 23 April, 2021, 11:06:05 pm »
Sounds like a classic case of doctor's handwriting!

I think my writing was pretty clear; their READING...

I would say that, wouldn't I?

Srsly, before I became unable to hold a pen, my writing was legible. Sheila never complained about my Arrivée contributions...

('Retrace to Mencap' resulted in a hand-written, detailed route sheet I could read from the bars...)

Cudzoziemiec

  • Eating all the pies and drinking all the tea.
Re: Google account birthday request
« Reply #81 on: 24 April, 2021, 08:56:21 am »
Yes, you would say that! Actually I thought the date was on the file or whatever written by your ex-GP, not on something written by you!
Riding a bike through a city is like navigating the collective neural pathways of a vast global mind.

hellymedic

  • Just do it!
Re: Google account birthday request
« Reply #82 on: 24 April, 2021, 12:52:02 pm »
My OLD NHS number related to my Number in the Birth Register. I think DoB anomalies might have been easier to spot as births in London N16 at the time were PKO* NNN , where N were sequential numerals...
Charles Docking (the Registrar) would be turning in his grave...