Author Topic: Trike  (Read 7945 times)

jogler

  • mojo operandi
Re: Trike
« Reply #25 on: December 21, 2009, 04:22:22 pm »
I always bring my 24" gear(size 42/7 continental/UK)  ;)
I occassionally use them to pedal with ;D

I do hope that you will give that precepice out of Arncliffe a miss this time:I don't yet own any crampons.

No, I'll not be using the trike next Monday.
I suspect that we will need something with a snow plough fitted to the front axle.

Regulator

  • That's Councillor Regulator to you...
Re: Trike
« Reply #26 on: December 22, 2009, 05:04:59 pm »
OK, jogler...

This baby is ready for you to collect and borrow for a while - bring a saddle and a quill stem if possible. The bars are high and untaped so that you can decide a comfy position first. I'd hate you to crash into that first hedge without feeling comfortable.  ;D  This thing scared me half to death when I first got it - be careful!

One of the front brakes is squealing, I hope it's because the rim is new.  :-\

I haven't riden it since I got my Longstaff - this Rogers is heavy to pedal and has twitchy steering in comparison.




You giving away trikes Gordy?!?!  Can I be next in line, please?   :thumbsup:


 ;D
Quote from: clarion
I completely agree with Reg.

Green Party Councillor

gordon taylor

Re: Trike
« Reply #27 on: January 01, 2010, 08:44:44 pm »
How's it going, jogler?
Have you ridden it yet?

I've now got a five-speed freewheel that'll fit if you want it.

jogler

  • mojo operandi
Re: Trike
« Reply #28 on: January 01, 2010, 09:17:27 pm »
I have ridden it but only for approx 1/2 mile to the village & back due to an attack of flu-like symptons which is keeping me bedridden for most of the time the last 4 days.
The first couple of days I spent fettling it(see "what have you fettled today" thread)& testing the fettles out front on the Close.
The ride experience was novel but enjoyable :thumbsup: & I find it comfortable to use.The future looks bright with Orange a trike.

A choice of gears would be usefull hereabouts so when I am no longer contaminated & contagious I'll make arrangements to come over:might even ride there 8),though atm I think I would have to push it up  the hill into Fulford ;)
Thanks again & see you soon

This thread is developing in such a way that it is now in the wrong place,methinks.I'll see if I am sufficiciently IT to move it.

jogler

  • mojo operandi
Re: Trike
« Reply #29 on: January 01, 2010, 09:22:48 pm »
HellsBells :o
This IT stuff is pretty clever with the "smokes 'n mirrors" game :thumbsup:

Sigurd Mudtracker

Re: Trike
« Reply #30 on: January 01, 2010, 09:54:25 pm »
I was surprised by the sudden appearance of this thread when I usually keep a beady eye on the Dark Side board - I think I understand why now.

I've been nerdishly adding up my totals for the combined fleet today (all in dry dock by reason of the weather).  I'm surprised to find that I've apparently done only 10 miles on my Ken Rogers in the last year - I was sure I'd been out on it much more than that.  Either that or the battery on the Cateye's gone flat and I've replaced it and forgotten about it - in which case I've done a couple of hundred on it.  At any rate I suspect that it's a lot less than it deserves (although I know I've probably increased its lifetime mileage tenfold whilst it's been in my possession).  I'm wondering if I can justify keeping it, especially when I'm thinking about adding another two wheeler to the fleet.

That said, the other surprising figure was that I've done more miles on my Kettweisel than on any other single bike or trike (at least ones that have computers on them - my Giant hybrid may well be in the lead by dint of daily, if local, use).  Again, I thought I was neglecting it, but that's clearly not the case.  You barrow boys probably wouldn't count it as a "proper" trike though!  ;)

Re: Trike
« Reply #31 on: January 02, 2010, 04:42:31 pm »
I got both my Longstaff conversion & Higgins fron fleabay.

Search on wide terms like "adult trike", "tricycle" as well as Higgins, Longstaff, Rogers.

My conversion was attached to a Raleigh MTB but proved to be a Madgetts setup for a disabled rider. Only £50 & a long trek to pick it up. Fits on a standard bike rack onto the towball.

Good conversions seem to be expensive as do quality vintage like Higgins.

The Pashley Picador came from a local supermarket advert. They fetch silly prices on Ebay for gaspipe technology.

I'm on two wheels in the snow with studed ice/snow tyres until the trikes can be riden in half-decent conditions. Still having fun in the snow

jogler

  • mojo operandi
Re: Trike
« Reply #32 on: January 06, 2010, 08:29:35 pm »
This is how Gordy's trike looks after I have fettled it.






Re: Trike
« Reply #33 on: January 06, 2010, 11:20:03 pm »
what front lights are those jogler ? Are they Sigma Ellipsoid ?

jogler

  • mojo operandi
Re: Trike
« Reply #34 on: January 07, 2010, 09:08:23 am »
Yes they are.Model FL 100

Re: Trike
« Reply #35 on: January 07, 2010, 01:47:12 pm »
That looks lovely Jogler, (except the bar tape, obviously ;)) it's really elegant :D
Quote from: Kim
^ This woman knows what she's talking about.

clarion

  • Tyke
Re: Trike
« Reply #36 on: January 07, 2010, 01:48:26 pm »
Want one.  Might not be able to steer it, or other advanced stuff like that, but I do want one. ;D
Getting there...

jogler

  • mojo operandi
Re: Trike
« Reply #37 on: January 07, 2010, 02:12:02 pm »
Since I acquired it I have been unable to do more than a mile or so due to illness & weather but the steering bit was less demanding than I expected:however  90 degree cornering is a bit a black art atm ::-)

robgul

  • Cycle:End-to-End webmaster
  • cyclist, Cytech accredited mechanic & woodworker
    • Cycle:End-to-End
Re: Trike
« Reply #38 on: January 07, 2010, 02:22:18 pm »
I am slowly mastering the pilotage of my Ken Rogers trike - I tried the "crossed hands" method and that certainly helped with countering the lean into corners issues (as you would with a 2 wheeler) - I now ride with normal hand usage BUT concentrate on keeping my head above/in-line with the cross-bar ... again for cornering reasons.

The riding effect on a trike is (at least to me) almost gyroscopic!

So far I've been up and down the road here - all of about 100 yards - but doing loads of laps to get the hang of it.  As soon as the weather gets a bit better I plan to take it to a reservoir near Rugby where there's a tarmac, traffic-free road all round the 5 miles or so - with some slopes and turns.  I shall be wearing a helmet and life-jacket ;D

Rob
Cycle:End-to-End     Resources and inspiration for the great adventure!
HoE Cycling Club

Sigurd Mudtracker

Re: Trike
« Reply #39 on: January 07, 2010, 03:27:04 pm »
I have some knobbly 700C tyres which I keep thinking I should put on my trike to get me through the snow.  Unfortunately the snow cover is now axle deep and what is clear now is so rutted that riding a three-tracked machine is going to be very difficult.

Plus I've only got two of them and one should go on the front for decent braking traction.

Zipperhead

  • The cyclist formerly known as Big Helga
Re: Trike
« Reply #40 on: January 07, 2010, 04:17:34 pm »
With two wheel drive, I've not found any problem with getting sufficient traction on my trike on 22 or 23mm smooth tyres.

Steering and braking on the ice is not in the same league though!
Our son does know who Boz Scaggs is, we've done ok as parents.

mtrike

  • aka action barbie
Re: Trike
« Reply #41 on: January 07, 2010, 09:04:09 pm »
With two wheel drive, I've not found any problem with getting sufficient traction on my trike on 22 or 23mm smooth tyres.

Steering and braking on the ice is not in the same league though!

The yeti is even better - two wheel drive and three wheel brakes on mud tyres make it go anywhere even on sheet ice.  The road barrow is a bit difficult having descended a hill with the front wheel locked and no control over my destination.

Zipperhead

  • The cyclist formerly known as Big Helga
Re: Trike
« Reply #42 on: January 08, 2010, 02:40:42 pm »
Ah yes, where my commute not fairly flat then I would have been cacking my pants. On the few (thankfully short) little descents on the way home last night I was keeping the speed well down.

Still, if I need to I can put my feet on the rear wheels for a bit more braking.
Our son does know who Boz Scaggs is, we've done ok as parents.

Re: Trike
« Reply #43 on: January 08, 2010, 03:17:01 pm »
Still, if I need to I can put my feet on the rear wheels for a bit more braking.
That is pretty awkward unless you are double jointed.  Far easier to use a hand; you can always press down if needed.

Zipperhead

  • The cyclist formerly known as Big Helga
Re: Trike
« Reply #44 on: January 09, 2010, 12:59:26 am »
It is awkward isn't it. I tried it tonight on the way home, on a fairly flat ice covered bit. I did manage to stop using only my feet on the tyres, but I don't think I'd want to rely on it in an emergency - and I don't think my boots or tyres would survive very long.

I think I'll return to the regular brakes and make sure that on ice I keep the speed under control - jumping off if necessary!

I found I had to be really careful on the ice, it was so easy to accelerate that I had to keep reminding myself that I couldn't brake or steer as easily as I was picking up speed and it could all go pear shaped very quickly.
Our son does know who Boz Scaggs is, we've done ok as parents.

gordon taylor

Re: Trike
« Reply #45 on: January 09, 2010, 07:45:21 am »
As above. I thought my upright trike was the answer to my icy commuting problems, but it scared me witless for a few days (but it was fun too!) Once that front wheel locks, you have no idea where you might end up.

A two wheeler with studs is much better on downhill ice.

Mind you, a three wheeler with studs and rear brakes could be the ultimate answer.  :thumbsup:

jogler

  • mojo operandi
Re: Trike
« Reply #46 on: January 21, 2010, 02:44:09 pm »
 This morning I rode the trike to town & back:12km.That's the longest distance I have used it for.Here are some thoughts...
The steering remains an "interesting" technique.Three wheels finds more potholes.The road-camber can be continueously felt through the steering.Other road users generally give more space when overtaking.It's handy having 3 wheels when waiting at traffic lights & junctions etc..It attracts attention from strangers:both peds & drivers want to ask questions about it.
I managed to lift the off-side wheel off the deck when when turning right :o
And finally...IT WAS A BLAST :thumbsup:


Regulator

  • That's Councillor Regulator to you...
Re: Trike
« Reply #47 on: January 21, 2010, 03:04:10 pm »
I wanna trike......!!!!!!
Quote from: clarion
I completely agree with Reg.

Green Party Councillor

Re: Trike
« Reply #48 on: January 21, 2010, 03:33:55 pm »
Quote
Three wheels finds more potholes.
Aim to miss holes with the front wheel.  If a rear wheel is aligned with a hole then apply slight pressure to the handlebars to just slightly unweight that wheel so it skims over the hole instead of sinking in.
Quote
I managed to lift the off-side wheel off the deck when when turning right
Since the right hand wheel is unweighted in a right turn this is not to be unexpected.  You need to apply more weight to the wheel inside the turn, although it is equally likely you were pulling up on the handlebars.  Having said that, even a very small lift of the wheel feels a lot.
Quote
And finally...IT WAS A BLAST
It always is.  Just wait until you have the confidence for athletic cornering.  Do not get over-confident in these early months - it can and will bite you.

jogler

  • mojo operandi
Re: Trike
« Reply #49 on: January 21, 2010, 03:54:28 pm »

It always is.  Just wait until you have the confidence for athletic cornering.  Do not get over-confident in these early months - it can and will bite you.

atm over-confidence is held at bay by....fear ;D