Author Topic: ALPI 4000  (Read 24683 times)

αdαmsκι

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Re: ALPI 4000
« Reply #125 on: 10 November, 2021, 01:17:00 pm »
Last time they had massive boards up at a few control points with a list of all riders. You had to add your signature next to your name to prove you'd been to that location with one of the (many) permanent markers tied to the board.

For example:

What on earth am I doing here on this beautiful day?! This is the only life I've got!!

https://tyredandhungry.wordpress.com/

Re: ALPI 4000
« Reply #126 on: 11 November, 2021, 08:12:54 am »
Ok i am interested,  great ride last time.

Re: ALPI 4000
« Reply #127 on: 11 November, 2021, 09:28:25 am »
The route looks fantastic... I have to say

Re: ALPI 4000
« Reply #128 on: 27 November, 2021, 02:11:29 pm »
Registration has now opened & I've entered. Excited for the route, dovetails quite nicely with TCR07, my only other ride through the Alps.

Need to figure out the best way to get there by train, probably going to 'Rinko' the bike and then ride up from Tirano.
“That slope may look insignificant, but it's going to be my destiny" - Fitzcarraldo

Re: ALPI 4000
« Reply #129 on: 01 December, 2021, 12:29:19 pm »
I've entered as well. The revised route looks fantastic!!
The train idea sounds nice, although Eurostar is far from bike-friendly travel anymore. When they were more flexible (and allowed taking bikes in bags as part of your normal baggage allowance) I did Eurostar to Paris, then Paris-Milan TGV, which was quite a scenic route.
I'll probably fly to Malpensa and looks like the organisers are arranging a transfer (coach or mini-bus) to Bormio (details by April 2022).

Re: ALPI 4000
« Reply #130 on: 27 December, 2021, 08:08:36 pm »
Did anyone else have trouble entering this? I was going to throw an entry in but get an error when trying to pay from the njuko website.
Looks like the problem is their end. I've tried multiple cards and browsers and it's an error on their side.

Orgs got back to me and apparently it's ok for others so maybe they just don't like my bank cards? Paypal it is then...

Re: ALPI 4000
« Reply #131 on: 29 December, 2021, 07:06:04 am »
I didn't have any problems using my credit card for payment.
Alternatively, set up your credit card on PayPal and use 'that' selected payment method when prompted by PayPal. Some credit cards offer a much more competetive (fee free) exchange rate than PayPal.

Re: ALPI 4000
« Reply #132 on: 30 January, 2022, 07:51:56 pm »
Hi all, I've registered for the Alpi 4000 - I've only done a few UK Audaxes but nothing to match this.   Always wanted to cycle the Italian Alps so I'll get the training in and see how we go! It looks an incredible route, really excited and scared at the same time :-)
Keen to know what average speed most riders will be aiming at.
If I could hit the 150 hour time limit (or probably the alternative 162 hour limit!) or probably just finish I would be very happy.  I'm not a youngster and would welcome any tips or suggestions/advice.   Travelling from Scotland so will probably fly to Malpensa and get the transfer coach.  Thanks in advance.     Ian

Pete Mas

  • Don't Worry 'bout a thing...
Re: ALPI 4000
« Reply #133 on: 31 January, 2022, 12:31:34 pm »
As a veteran of the Mille Miglia 1001, 999 Miles, and I nearly finished the first Alpi 4000, I suggest you go for the 162 hour BRI limit, as it will allow more time for sleep and other stops, if you are not sure how you will go. As for advice, you should read all the general advice in this thread, from page 1 onwards, as the last Alpi 4000 had similar challenges to the current one. Also search for the Mille Miglia and 999 miles threads for advice. Another tip is too book some private accommodation along the way, that can be cancelled if not required, e.g. via booking.com as the communal stops can often be crowded and noisy, preventing you from resting properly. Bear in mind it's advantageous to have previous experience of multi -day audax events, and many of riders will have completed PBP and other 1000 km events.

Personally I would have loved to ride this event, but have decided that I'm now too slow to really enjoy it, without putting myself through some serious danger from sleep deprivation. I may perhaps still come out to ride some of the course though! The provisional route is now up: - https://www.alpi4000.it/en/tappe

EDIT:- I am now aiming to ride the route over 10 days. Send me a PM if you want to know more. I found B&Bs from £27!
''It is better to travel hopefully than to arrive."

R.L.Stevenson

αdαmsκι

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Re: ALPI 4000
« Reply #134 on: 02 February, 2022, 12:48:48 pm »
On the point about accommodation: For Alpi4000 in 2018 postie, veloboy and I used the provided accommodation in Biella for the first night. Then for the remaining four nights we booked accommodation in the afternoon for that evening based on what we could find on booking.com
What on earth am I doing here on this beautiful day?! This is the only life I've got!!

https://tyredandhungry.wordpress.com/

Re: ALPI 4000
« Reply #135 on: 06 May, 2022, 10:35:46 am »
I was asked about AAA for this over the weekend in Darlington - this is my understanding of how this should all work.

If you plan on riding it in under 150 hours then once it's validated as BRM/LRM email the recorder at audax.uk and cc aaa (me) to have it included in your results as an overseas 1400 and I'll add on the 23.5AAA (based on their current headline climbing figure). This is how Borders of Belgium (partial-AAA in the Ardennes), etc. have been handled in the past.

However if you are only going for their 162 hour BRI brevet then I believe the 'Hamburg-Berlin-Cologne' rule (for non-ACP overseas brevets) would apply so you would need to enter as a 1400 *BP* (based on the time limit) DIY as well to get any AAA, and you would have to decide to do this beforehand.
“That slope may look insignificant, but it's going to be my destiny" - Fitzcarraldo

αdαmsκι

  • Twitter @Dr_AAY Instagram @ucfaaay Strava @ucfaaay
  • Look haggard. It sells.
Re: ALPI 4000
« Reply #136 on: 07 May, 2022, 12:57:30 pm »
None of us who rode the 2018 ALPI asked about AAA points tho it would have been interesting to know how many we could have claimed. I don't think the routes are that dissimilar so around 20 would be seem about right.

(My Ride With GPS track has 1,540 km & 19,400 m.)
What on earth am I doing here on this beautiful day?! This is the only life I've got!!

https://tyredandhungry.wordpress.com/

Pete Mas

  • Don't Worry 'bout a thing...
Re: ALPI 4000
« Reply #137 on: 10 July, 2022, 09:18:13 pm »
How did all this year's entrants get on? I've heard of a few successful results. I greatly enjoyed riding the route independently over 10 days, and spoke to some of the riders that i saw on the route, including some on the Stelvio about to finish, though it was not the finish for me, as i started in Milan Malpensa. I didn't manage to avoid night riding completely, due to having a long day when I had to shelter from several thunderstorms, and went off route as i loaded the wrong garmin track...Hence that night I didn't make my planned hotel, and slept outside another near Susa on chairs. as it was too late to check-in. That actually helped me as i could start the climb of Colle delle Finestre before dawn, and before the heat of the day. most days it was 33C even late in the day, and a gilet was rarely needed on descents. the scenery was amazing, and the roue was a good mix of faster roads alongside cyclepaths, and some gravel sections. Earlier I particularly enjoyed Lake Como, where we took a ferry from Varenna to Bellagio, and the climb to Madonna to Ghisallo cyclists' chapel and museum.
''It is better to travel hopefully than to arrive."

R.L.Stevenson

Re: ALPI 4000
« Reply #138 on: 10 July, 2022, 09:50:52 pm »
We both got around. It was far and away my partner's longest "ride" but breaking it into 230k days and having decent hotel stops meant we did it quite comfortably.

I need to get my photos into a proper gallery, but here's some Strava links to the various days and some photos. Absolutely stunning scenery.

https://www.strava.com/activities/7415933056 Passo Gavia shakedown ride
https://www.strava.com/activities/7418418875 Shakedown 2 Torri di Fraele & Bormio 2000
https://www.strava.com/activities/7419050448 Passo del Gavia, Mortirolo, Lake Como, Madonna del Ghisallo
https://www.strava.com/activities/7419050276 Oropa Sanctuary, Colle del Nivolet
https://www.strava.com/activities/7419050004 Colle Delle Finestre, Sestriere
https://www.strava.com/activities/7419049856 Lago di Viverone
https://www.strava.com/activities/7419049869 Lake Endine, Lake Iseo, Passo Tre Termini, Passo di San Rocco, Lake Garda
https://www.strava.com/activities/7419049463 Lake Molveno, Passo Palade, Sud Tirol
https://www.strava.com/activities/7419048594 Decided to stop early on the far side of Stelvio so we could see it in daylight.
https://www.strava.com/activities/7419048270 Bormio (not) recovery ride Could barely manage this, let alone the full 32k or whatever it was. Not much flat road in Bormio.

hippy

Re: ALPI 4000
« Reply #139 on: 11 July, 2022, 03:16:05 pm »
Full (LRM) finish list is here: https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/1U9IDe9-oJVh3C9R2_nA6MLr4EXOC7Z-k/

I got round on fixed with a flip/flop hub which might be a first for Alpi from the way everybody seemed to be staring at my bike at the start. Had akin for company for most of it which helped a lot, sharing hotel rooms, towing each other across the Po valley, etc. It was challenging but riding in Italy is fantastic once you have adjusted to their way of doing things, in particular the driving.

I posted a minimal diary on instagram (sorry if login required):
https://www.instagram.com/p/CfQY3GNI4m3/
https://www.instagram.com/p/CfVQqDfIMqw/
https://www.instagram.com/p/CfYDgFjowXE/
https://www.instagram.com/p/CfgFmoisigy/
https://www.instagram.com/p/CfgKrqMMx7P/
https://www.instagram.com/p/CfeoafssfKq/

And of course it's on Strava: https://www.strava.com/activities/7400620194

Went by train (Eurostar+TGV to Milan, then Trenord to Tirano) and back again with very little hassle at all, thanks to Olaf's blog: https://cycling-intelligence.com/2019/07/31/the-secrets-of-a-rinko-bike-how-to-get-a-near-perfect-steed-for-train-travel/
“That slope may look insignificant, but it's going to be my destiny" - Fitzcarraldo