Author Topic: Renovating a Victorian end of terrace house  (Read 7980 times)

Mrs Pingu

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Re: Renovating a Victorian end of terrace house
« Reply #75 on: 11 February, 2021, 01:07:33 pm »
Gallows brackets ???
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Re: Renovating a Victorian end of terrace house
« Reply #76 on: 11 February, 2021, 01:48:48 pm »
The "old style" way of removing fireplaces was to support the remainder of the stack (once having removed the lower part) with an angle iron bracket with a brace (hence, gallows)



I really don't like them, and would prefer to remove the stack all the way to the top but that would be a substantial additional effort  and require building control. So, I took a deep breath and made up the faux fireplace, ignoring the c.5cm the wall leans outward at the top, as that seems very historic (there's an OLD wall tie that looks as if it was intended to address that) and best left well alone. (you can just see the bottom of the brackets at the top)

Re: Renovating a Victorian end of terrace house
« Reply #77 on: 11 February, 2021, 05:27:40 pm »
You're quite right to 'really not like' gallows brackets.  I would avoid specifying a gallows bracket solution at virtually all costs.  Especially where the chimney breast is on a party wall, where the adjoining property may well do something similar, and you end up with two chimney breasts precariously balanced either side of the wall...  :o

The best solution is a ceiling-level steel in line with the front of the breast, and little 'needle' beams to support the cheeks.

Mrs Pingu

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Re: Renovating a Victorian end of terrace house
« Reply #78 on: 11 February, 2021, 05:55:20 pm »
Everyday is a school day...
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Re: Renovating a Victorian end of terrace house
« Reply #79 on: 11 February, 2021, 06:15:53 pm »

The best solution is a ceiling-level steel in line with the front of the breast, and little 'needle' beams to support the cheeks.

Isn't the best solution to take out the whole stack, top to  bottom and make good? In my simple mind the buttress effect of the stack is overwhelmingly negated by the torsional effect of a couple of tons of brick stuck out 18"?

It's a flank wall, and they took out both fireplaces. I'd leave the rear one which is smaller. They also buggered with the bay, but the relief arch is just about still in place. It looks like the centre of the front has dropped, and the flank wall is all about the place but - apparently - stable. I put little weight behind the original works being done under building control, but as it was done  >20 years ago, it is likely stable now.

archy

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Re: Renovating a Victorian end of terrace house
« Reply #80 on: 12 February, 2021, 09:52:01 am »
Oops..  My neighbours have just had the chimney breast replaced with gallows brackets.  I think I might nip round there later and tell them we are planning to do the same :demon:
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nicknack

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Re: Renovating a Victorian end of terrace house
« Reply #81 on: 12 February, 2021, 10:12:52 am »
Our old house (we left 7 years ago) was in the family since 1969. A fairly standard 30s two storey detached house with a chimney in the middle between the two downstairs living rooms. When we moved in, dad (a builder and decorator by trade) removed the chimney breast in one of the downstairs rooms and the bedroom above it. The section in the loft he left unsupported. As far as I know it's still like it.
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Re: Renovating a Victorian end of terrace house
« Reply #82 on: 12 February, 2021, 11:33:37 am »
The best solution is a ceiling-level steel in line with the front of the breast, and little 'needle' beams to support the cheeks.
Isn't the best solution to take out the whole stack, top to  bottom and make good? In my simple mind the buttress effect of the stack is overwhelmingly negated by the torsional effect of a couple of tons of brick stuck out 18"?
Yebbut sometimes you don't have the luxury of being able to do that (e.g. where the chimney stack is shared, or where the purlins bear onto the shoulders of the chimney at roof-level).
...dad (a builder and decorator by trade) removed the chimney breast in one of the downstairs rooms and the bedroom above it. The section in the loft he left unsupported. As far as I know it's still like it.
:o  It's amazing what does stand up.  I often see things like masonry first-floor walls built directly off timber joists, or (this morning) a purlin propped off a ceiling binder :facepalm:.

Re: Renovating a Victorian end of terrace house
« Reply #83 on: 03 March, 2021, 06:33:51 am »
Been too busy to post much lately but we're on the home (hah!) straight now, looks like they might be ready to move in this weekend, nip and tuck with the baby.

Upstairs is ready and decorated, with only the worst wall in the room with the replaced floor still too damp to paint. Floors, plumbing etc sorted. Only waiting carpets in the rooms to be carpeted before occupation

Downstairs is approaching finished pro tem, kitchen is finished with flooring, main room to be sanded this week, sub floor supports fixed with scaffolding screw jacks. etc, etc, etc.

Mrs Pingu

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Re: Renovating a Victorian end of terrace house
« Reply #84 on: 03 March, 2021, 05:39:41 pm »
Wow, how did all of that happen so quickly?!
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Re: Renovating a Victorian end of terrace house
« Reply #85 on: 04 March, 2021, 09:26:15 pm »
Sometimes I wonder. Using an ace firm of plasterers helped (rugby club sourced) and I've bought in help because I just haven't got the time but all in all, it feels good.

Album of photos is here https://photos.app.goo.gl/VTcVhRQcyA5kV7o59, not sure how the order is going to be, think the recent shots are at the bottom. You may want to take particular note of the corbels, restored courtesy of peelaway ® and more than a little graft.

Re: Renovating a Victorian end of terrace house
« Reply #86 on: 04 March, 2021, 09:36:59 pm »
Tidy.
Your girl ( I know she's more than a girl) is  lucky.

Jaded

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Re: Renovating a Victorian end of terrace house
« Reply #87 on: 04 March, 2021, 09:41:01 pm »
 :thumbsup:
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Mrs Pingu

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Re: Renovating a Victorian end of terrace house
« Reply #88 on: 04 March, 2021, 09:45:51 pm »
OMG, that looked like it was fit for demolition a few weeks ago and now it looks amazing! (Why does every tiny project I start take months?) I particularly love the hexagonal tiles on the bathroom floor and the retro radiators.
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Re: Renovating a Victorian end of terrace house
« Reply #89 on: 04 March, 2021, 10:07:03 pm »
That's an excellent Job Ham.  I particularly like the brickwork and window features upstairs at the front which you've brought back to life.

It's because you live in your project Mrs P.  We have similar restraints not helped by mllePB working from home for the last 12 months. 

Re: Renovating a Victorian end of terrace house
« Reply #90 on: 24 August, 2021, 06:55:07 pm »
Well, the scaffolding is down, so the final (ok a small amount of pointing for Pink and Perky to finish above the porch) view is now on show. Before is to the right. at some point the porch will go, with a square bay around the downstairs to replace it, but that's not a priority.


Re: Renovating a Victorian end of terrace house
« Reply #91 on: 24 August, 2021, 07:11:58 pm »
Well, the scaffolding is down, so the final (ok a small amount of pointing for Pink and Perky to finish above the porch) view is now on show. Before is to the right. at some point the porch will go, with a square bay around the downstairs to replace it, but that's not a priority.


Oh that's most dandy.
Lucky gal!

ian

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Re: Renovating a Victorian end of terrace house
« Reply #92 on: 24 August, 2021, 07:55:21 pm »
Looks good, it just needs the pebbledashing redone.
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Mrs Pingu

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Re: Renovating a Victorian end of terrace house
« Reply #93 on: 24 August, 2021, 08:12:06 pm »
Looks amazing.
Do not clench. It only makes it worse.

Re: Renovating a Victorian end of terrace house
« Reply #94 on: 24 August, 2021, 08:52:21 pm »
Beautiful work!

Re: Renovating a Victorian end of terrace house
« Reply #95 on: 26 August, 2021, 02:16:24 pm »
Looks good, it just needs the pebbledashing redone.
;D

It looks very grand, well done Ham et al!

Re: Renovating a Victorian end of terrace house
« Reply #96 on: 26 August, 2021, 02:32:00 pm »
Well done, looks really good.
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Blodwyn Pig

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Re: Renovating a Victorian end of terrace house
« Reply #97 on: 28 August, 2021, 08:21:56 pm »
Looks a good job. I've done 12 like that now,  looking for number 12A, sold most, but still got a few.  Well Done.

robgul

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Re: Renovating a Victorian end of terrace house
« Reply #98 on: 29 August, 2021, 08:25:22 am »
Looks fantastic - reminds me of a property our family owned way back in the 1970s in Clinton Road (just off Dames Road) - prices now seem to be beyond eye-watering :hand:

Re: Renovating a Victorian end of terrace house
« Reply #99 on: 04 September, 2021, 07:13:53 pm »
Great thread and a beautiful house rescue! Well done fam Ham!

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