Author Topic: Grammar that makes you cringe  (Read 578746 times)

T42

  • Old fool in a hurry
Re: Grammar that makes you cringe
« Reply #6175 on: 11 August, 2021, 04:21:34 pm »
'caveat emptor'

I presume that's where the current use of caveat as a noun stems from. This is a common side effect of popular set phrases where some or all of the constituent parts are uncommon and/or foreign words. Something gets lost in translation.

Not so sure. I did an ngram of caveat and caveat emptor, and caveat on its own appears to be much more frequent. Of course the caveat dataset will contain the caveat emptor data as well, but the simple caveat graph isn't in step with it.

But they never got to Carcassonne.

citoyen

  • Occasionally rides a bike
Re: Grammar that makes you cringe
« Reply #6176 on: 11 August, 2021, 05:02:49 pm »
'caveat emptor'

I presume that's where the current use of caveat as a noun stems from. This is a common side effect of popular set phrases where some or all of the constituent parts are uncommon and/or foreign words. Something gets lost in translation.

Not so sure. I did an ngram of caveat and caveat emptor, and caveat on its own appears to be much more frequent. Of course the caveat dataset will contain the caveat emptor data as well, but the simple caveat graph isn't in step with it.

That ngram suggests caveat became really popular as a standalone word in the 1960s, and has continued to grow in popularity since then. I imagine that's when it became detached from its original source and meaning to take on a life of its own.

As to what that original source was, I can't claim to know, but I still feel it's most likely to have been abstracted from a set phrase, such as caveat emptor. Or it could be a bit of legal jargon that has made the transition into mainstream language. Legalese is often the original source for this kind of thing.

Anyway, it's clear that something happened in the 1960s to help it gain a foothold in everyday use. I bet it's all that swinging that went on then. Bloody hippies. No respect for standards.
"The future's all yours, you lousy bicycles."

Re: Grammar that makes you cringe
« Reply #6177 on: 22 August, 2021, 11:47:36 am »
Today on the BBC “Don Everly… the last surviving member of the rock ‘n roll duo…”.
We are making a New World (Paul Nash, 1918)

Cudzoziemiec

  • Моя планета голубая, я люблю тебя и обнимаю
Re: Grammar that makes you cringe
« Reply #6178 on: 31 August, 2021, 03:40:41 pm »
From a podcast: "Ultimately, my initial reaction was... "
Riding a bike through a city is like navigating the collective neural pathways of a vast global mind.

T42

  • Old fool in a hurry
Re: Grammar that makes you cringe
« Reply #6179 on: 14 September, 2021, 09:34:14 am »
We could almost split off a usage/malapropism thread.  In a YT history documentary I watched the other day the narrator kept saying "exasperate" instead of "exacerbate", as in "this only exasperated the situation".  Oh joy.
But they never got to Carcassonne.

Pingu

  • Put away those fiery biscuits!
  • Mrs Pingu's domestique
    • the Igloo
Re: Grammar that makes you cringe
« Reply #6180 on: 16 September, 2021, 11:33:39 pm »
https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-scotland-highlands-islands-58585603

Quote from: Auntie Beeb
Two people were in the lorry's cab, and one was able to get out themselves...

Also, it was a self-driving vehicle again  :demon:

Cudzoziemiec

  • Моя планета голубая, я люблю тебя и обнимаю
Re: Grammar that makes you cringe
« Reply #6181 on: 17 September, 2021, 08:35:56 am »
With a self-extricating passenger (who obviously can't have been driving).
Riding a bike through a city is like navigating the collective neural pathways of a vast global mind.

Cudzoziemiec

  • Моя планета голубая, я люблю тебя и обнимаю
Re: Grammar that makes you cringe
« Reply #6182 on: 17 September, 2021, 09:11:50 am »
Quote
Four amateur astronauts blasted off from Florida on a private SpaceX mission, paid for by billionaire Jared Issacman. But to which of the following were they aiming to reach a similar altitude?
Ugh!
https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-58555204
Riding a bike through a city is like navigating the collective neural pathways of a vast global mind.

Tim Hall

  • Victoria is my queen
Re: Grammar that makes you cringe
« Reply #6183 on: 17 September, 2021, 02:22:18 pm »
The other day I was typoing something into WhatsApp on my phone. The sentence included the works "thinks", to which the phone (unhelpfully) suggested "think's" as an alternative.

Two things struck me:

1.   I didn't mean "think's" thanks very much.

2.  What valid use is there for the word "think's" anyway?
There are two ways you can get exercise out of a bicycle: you can
"overhaul" it, or you can ride it.  (Jerome K Jerome)

Re: Grammar that makes you cringe
« Reply #6184 on: Yesterday at 09:21:13 pm »
When did "change" mutate into "change up"?  It was cute when my daughter, then 3, said it.  It sounds moronic when adults say it.
And Darkness and Decay and the Coronavirus held illimitable dominion over all.