Poll

Ribble bikes are:

Top bit of kit - A1, why pay more?
18 (38.3%)
Reasonable value for money, good for the ability to build up to your own spec'
20 (42.6%)
Ok, good for a winter trainer
7 (14.9%)
Not the bargain I thought, would not buy again
0 (0%)
I would not put this on my turbo-trainer
2 (4.3%)

Total Members Voted: 41

Author Topic: Ribble Bikes  (Read 34482 times)

vince

Ribble Bikes
« on: March 28, 2008, 12:13:04 am »
OK, their service is the stuff of legend - and also catered for on the Retailers bit of the board. I've just come back from that bit of the country and whilst an extensive search under the Ribblehead Viaduct did not turn up any elves manufacturing cycles, I saw a lot of them (Ribble - not elves) out on the road.

How many people have these bikes? What sort have frame etc. did you choose from their mix 'n' match set up. Was it worth it? Are you happy with it?

Again, if you never actually got it, or they sent a Pashley Piccolo instead there is a thread in Retailers 

Re: Ribble Bikes
« Reply #1 on: March 29, 2008, 01:03:14 pm »
I have been perfectly happy with my Ribble winter bike (105 triple).  Good value. Watch out for their frame sizing information though. I got caught out and ordered a frame one size too large.

PaulF

  • "World's Scariest Barman"
  • It's only impossible if you stop to think about it
Re: Ribble Bikes
« Reply #2 on: March 29, 2008, 01:31:00 pm »
I've got one of their 'Special' Winter Trainers and have been very happy with it - excepting the delivery :(. Came up £200 less than had I used 'Bike Builder' to get something of a similar spec.

PaulF

  • "World's Scariest Barman"
  • It's only impossible if you stop to think about it
Re: Ribble Bikes
« Reply #3 on: March 29, 2008, 02:08:00 pm »
In fact here's my review from last November:

I'm not sure that I'm best qualified to write this since the last time I rode a road bike was 20 years ago (and they were called racing bikes then  :-).

Having restarted cycling in July and commuting on a 20 year old mountain bike I decided to move to a road bike for  a faster commute and possibly some longer distance stuff. After a little research and consultation I settled on a  Ribble 2006 7005 Winter Training/Audax Xenon 9 Triple . Having 'Built a bike' on the Ribble website I looked in the Special Edition bike section and realised that I could get a similar spec for about £180 less!

First impression was how light the thing was when I lifted it out of the box! The welds probably aren't as pretty as on some more expensive frames but that's really my only cosmetic concern. The bike is supplied without pedals but after fitting pedals, seatpost & saddle and turning the forks is ready to ride.

Fitting a rack was a little problematic, it shares bosses with the mudguards fine but the upper bosses were placed so that they fouled on the brakes. A little fettling assistance from hatler soon sorted this.



So now for the ride - I can tell that you're on the edge of your seats now :).

I'll skip the first few wobbly, where are the brakes, which way do these gears work again trips whilst I got used to the new position and equipment etc.. Just bear in mind these comments are in comparison to my mountain bikes rather than other road bikes.

To state the obvious it's a a lot faster :-D!! Acceleration is rapid and top speed on my commute about 5mph higher. At speed it feels very stable, I'm still testing it's limits so top speed so far is just over 33mph.

The equipment seems good; Campag Mirage/Xenon, all changes are positive and shifts quietly from gear to gear. Just need to remember which button does what and learn how to use the gears more efficiently now!

I was expecting to be a lot less comfortable than I am on it. The combination of thinner tyres and an aluminium frame make for a harsher ride than I'm used but I've got used to the ride position. More importantly most of my muscles have as well so aside from a little lower back ache on the initial rides I adapted fairly easily.

So overall would I buy it again? Definitely yes! From my research it seemed to offer best value for money in terms of components and is a fast comfortable ride for the price. My only concern is Ribble's 'fulfillment'. The quoted 10 - 14 days build time stretched into over a month :(

6 months and 1300 or so miles on I'm till very happy so my recommendation would still stand

Re: Ribble Bikes
« Reply #4 on: April 13, 2008, 12:45:59 am »
Just wanted to add my 2 pence to this thread.

I ordered what is my first road bike after a long debate of whether I should "risk" buying it from Ribble after reading all the mixed feelings about their service. I figured after thinking long and hard and comparing all the specs and bikes under the sun that I simply could not get a similar spec anywhere else for my 500 pound budget, plus I get to customize chainset, handlebar width, stem, crank length, instead of having to put up with what comes on the off the peg bike in my size.

The build I chose was one of their special ed. bikes.

The Winter / Audax frame in matte black with a Campag Mirage 10sp group, 50/34 compact with an 11-25 cassette. Campag Khamsin Wheelset. Carbon forks, carbon seat post, Selle Italia Transam saddle, Continental UltraSports, and white bar tape.

Spot on my 500 quid budget.


After measuring myself up and deciding on sizes I ordered the bike (and some pedals) on the Saturday night, got my automatic order confirmation and disclaimer noting between 7-14 days for delivery), and kept my fingers crossed and started my wait.

First thing Monday I had an email from them to mention a problem authorising my card. I called them right away and we happy got it sorted over the phone. I got an email later on in the day from the guy I spoke to to confirm the deposit had gone through ok on the card this time.

I had another email later on in the day to say my order for the pedals had been dispatched. They arrived the next day.

Received another email the day after to say my bike had been booked its place in the workshop for the following monday and would be shipped two days later.

On the Tuesday (after workshop day) I got the dispatch email and the bike arrived with Parcel Force the Friday lunch time.

Rode the bike this morning and its great. I'm very happy with the quality of the build , it goes like shit off a shovel and had the lovely surprise of it coming with Mavic  Aksiums instead of the Campagnolo Khamsins that were meant to come with the build. I imagine they might have run out of the Khamsins so I got a slight wheel upgrade for free. Bonus. At first I thought I wouldn't get on with the saddle but so far so good. The white bar tape is going to get filthy, so probably wasn't a good idea, but thats easily changed so I´m not too worried.

So, after been very apprehensive about ordering from them all I can say is I´ll definitely order from them again. They must be trying to get better, fair play to them.

Pictures of the bike in the Gallery to follow soon  :thumbsup:

Rob


Rapples

Re: Ribble Bikes
« Reply #5 on: April 13, 2008, 12:59:36 am »
I've had one of their 7005 bikes for abot 5 years now, great value no problems with customer service, came with wrong calipers but they sent some upgraded ones no problem.  Still going strong ;D ;D

αdαmsκι

  • @Dr_AAY
  • Look haggard. It sells.
Re: Ribble Bikes
« Reply #6 on: July 08, 2008, 12:05:04 pm »
I got a Ribble Audax bike about 6 weeks ago and I now feel happy to give me opinion on the bike.  I had about £500 to spend on the bike & initially I was looking at getting one of their Audax frames built up with Campag Xenon using their Bike Builder.  I then noticed that the Ribble Special Edition Bikes would allow me to spend £500 but with Campag Mirage instead of Xenon.  If I had got the same spec bike using the Ribble Bike Builder I would have paid at least £150 extra.

So what I ordered was basically the same as Rob C. talked about 2 posts back.  Ribble Audax frame with Campagnolo Mirage 50/34 compact.  The wheels were meant to be Campagnolo Khamsin Black Wheelset, but like Rob C. I ended up with Mavic  Aksiums.  My leg measurements suggested a 58 cm frame, which is what I would have guessed at myself.  The Ribble website recommended a 120 mm stem for use with a 58 cm frame for cyclists with an average reach.  From my own experience I thought that a 120 mm stem would be too long considering my body shape (I need a 58 cm frame because I've got long legs in comparison to my torso) and I plunked for a 90 mm.  If it happened to be wrong then it would be easy enough to change, but it still felt risky trying to guess at this sort of thing without being able to see the bike.

Two weeks after ordering the bike turned up.  Everything was well packaged and I just had to turn the handlebars and fit the seatpost, seat and my own peddles.  Since getting the bike I've cycled it to The Netherlands, done a few ~70 km rides, one 400 km ride and one 140 km ride.  Initially I thought the stem was too long, but messing around with the saddle position solved that problem (but I'm very glad I got the 90 mm stem and not the 120 mm stem) and without too much faffing I found a comfortable set up on the bike.  As you'd expect the gears were set up perfectly when the bike arrived, save for a bit of cable stretch.  I'm happily surprised at the saddle, which is pretty good despite it being just some standard thing.  Despite the frame being aluminium the ride is not too harsh, which is probably due to the carbon fork.  I was amazingly comfort throughout the 400 km ride, the only probably being caused by me having the saddle slightly too high.

Naturally I've had a few niggles with the bike, but this are minimal.  Fitting a rack to the bike resulted it in fowling the rare brake and as I didn't have time to sort it out properly I simply removed the left hand horizontal mounting point from the rack.  PaulF also commented on this issue.  The mudguard and rack bosses are the same and the screws that came with the bike were not long enough to fit both mudguards and a rack, but that was solved after a trip to Condor.  The tyres on the bike are a work of the devil to get on and off the wheels.

Overall I'm very happy with the bike, esp. considering the price and if you want a £500 audax bike then I'd recommend getting a Ribble bike. 
What on earth am I doing here on this beautiful day?! This is the only life I've got!!

https://tyredandhungry.wordpress.com/

RogerT

  • Playing with a big steamy thing
Re: Ribble Bikes
« Reply #7 on: July 23, 2008, 11:19:32 am »
I ordered a Ribble Audax/winter frame last week. It came with a free Alpina Carbon Audax fork and I added an integrated headset.  The whole lot including carraige came to just over £130.00.

7 days later a lovely new frame and fork arrived, perfectly wrapped and with the headest fitted to the Frame/forks.

I have spent the last 2 days building it up using a combination of parts from my old Dawes Audax and one or 2 new bits.  Everything went together perfectly with no glitches at all.

First ride impressions are favourable, it is a lot livelier than my Dawes, which is no bad thing.  Long term reports to follow in due course.

Ribble have been faultless in their execution of not only the frame/forks, but also sent some additional bits I needed within 24hrs.

Now where are those TT aero bars ??

Added 13.30 23.07.08  Just done 10 mile test ride  ..Very impressed..



Re: Ribble Bikes
« Reply #8 on: July 24, 2008, 04:19:32 pm »
I am very very tempted by a Ribble Dedacciai Scuro HCR Centaur 10 Double for 1400UKP. TT-ing and fast summer rides.

Can't link to it directly because Ribble's website is written by idiots (no hope with Firefox).



2 week "fad bracket" in operation. If I still want to buy it on the 7th August I'll be placing an order. *gulp*
"Yes please" said Squirrel "biscuits are our favourite things."

rdaviesb

Re: Ribble Bikes
« Reply #9 on: September 16, 2008, 08:34:16 pm »
Running a three year old 7005 winter frame. Been everywhere on it, loaded with luggage, fast audaxes, commuting the lot. Fantastic value for money, and really stable at speed. Highly recommended. Forget the crap about their service; that's all in the past.

Re: Ribble Bikes
« Reply #10 on: September 17, 2008, 11:09:55 am »
Running a three year old 7005 winter frame. Been everywhere on it, loaded with luggage, fast audaxes, commuting the lot. Fantastic value for money, and really stable at speed. Highly recommended. Forget the crap about their service; that's all in the past.
Sloping (wide clearance) or normal geometry frame?
<i>Marmite slave</i>

Re: Ribble Bikes
« Reply #11 on: September 17, 2008, 11:25:26 am »
I am very very tempted by a Ribble Dedacciai Scuro HCR Centaur 10 Double for 1400UKP. TT-ing and fast summer rides.

Can't link to it directly because Ribble's website is written by idiots (no hope with Firefox).



2 week "fad bracket" in operation. If I still want to buy it on the 7th August I'll be placing an order. *gulp*


Or alternatively you could pay an extra £500 or so and get an identical bike but withe the word Kona on it!

If you get it I'd love to know your thoughts on it

Re: Ribble Bikes
« Reply #12 on: September 17, 2008, 01:40:14 pm »
If you get it I'd love to know your thoughts on it

Decided to get it via the cyclescheme next April as I simply don't need it over the winter and I can spend the 40% tax saving on Kysrium SLs to replace the Aksiums.
"Yes please" said Squirrel "biscuits are our favourite things."

Re: Ribble Bikes
« Reply #13 on: September 17, 2008, 02:17:08 pm »
I am very very tempted by a Ribble Dedacciai Scuro HCR

Out of interest, Greenbank, what makes that particular bike stand out?

Re: Ribble Bikes
« Reply #14 on: September 17, 2008, 02:54:58 pm »
I am very very tempted by a Ribble Dedacciai Scuro HCR

Out of interest, Greenbank, what makes that particular bike stand out?

The Deda CF frames have got great reviews and are used by lots of other bike builders and Ribble add the least on when they put their transfers on (see Pumpe's comment about Kona and mike's about the Condor Baracchi elsewhere).

And out of the 3 Deda carbon frames that Ribble sell this is the most expensive. :)

The rest of the bike will be built to my spec: Centaur, Ksyrium SLs, etc, etc.

I will then take it on some lovely hilly rides where it will fly up the hills.
"Yes please" said Squirrel "biscuits are our favourite things."

Re: Ribble Bikes
« Reply #15 on: September 17, 2008, 03:06:00 pm »
The deda nero ones are everywhere too, even Wiggle do one now.  Strangely the Deda Ribelle frames seems far less common.

I really thought about getting one but got a Look 585 instead.  The only downside of the scuro is that it needs a scuro seatpost (I fink)

rdaviesb

Re: Ribble Bikes
« Reply #16 on: September 20, 2008, 11:45:40 am »
Quote
Sloping (wide clearance) or normal geometry frame?
It's got a flat top tube. I think they may have tightened the clearances recently, as I generally run with 25c tyres and mudguards (even ran with 28c tyres and mudguards once - very tight), but forum talk has been that this is not possible on the newest frames.

Re: Ribble Bikes
« Reply #17 on: September 23, 2008, 11:18:55 am »
Quote
Sloping (wide clearance) or normal geometry frame?
It's got a flat top tube. I think they may have tightened the clearances recently, as I generally run with 25c tyres and mudguards (even ran with 28c tyres and mudguards once - very tight), but forum talk has been that this is not possible on the newest frames.
It can be hard to work out what clearances the frame have.

I had a chat with Ribble before ordering my bike. Confusingly, there are two sloping frames, one with wider clearances. The main page showing geometry doesn't include the Winter/Audax sloping frame. The Winter/Audax has a *much* longer top tube, and is only available in 4 very odd sizes. I did find out that the horizontal models are only supposed to fit 25mm with mudguards.

The carbon fork they fit to these come in three flavours, 2 with mudguard eyes. One is 5mm longer than the others, for 28mm tyres with mudguards.

As this was hard to find out, I hope Ribble don't have trouble picking the parts and fit the wrong ones!
Their website now has order tracking; my order has changed from 'Progressing' to 'In Picking'. I guess this means someone has started building the bike.
<i>Marmite slave</i>

clarion

  • Tyke
Re: Ribble Bikes
« Reply #18 on: September 23, 2008, 11:27:00 am »
I have to admit that the £400 winter bikes currently being advertised in the mags do look attractively good value.  OK, so I'd want a triple, but it'd be a good commuting bike, and very very Cycleschemeable.
Getting there...

Re: Ribble Bikes
« Reply #19 on: September 23, 2008, 12:40:52 pm »
You've identified what is, for me, a major weakness. The gear range isn't good, with far too much at the top end. The main ring is a 52, only swopable for a 50. I don't think the small ring (39) goes any lower.

Anyone know what the range of a Tiagra changer is?
<i>Marmite slave</i>

αdαmsκι

  • @Dr_AAY
  • Look haggard. It sells.
Re: Ribble Bikes
« Reply #20 on: September 23, 2008, 02:06:36 pm »
Could you get a compact chainset (34 teeth & 50 teeth) instead of a triple?  If you get a large enough range of sprockets at the back you should still be able to get the same gear ratios as a triple would give you.
What on earth am I doing here on this beautiful day?! This is the only life I've got!!

https://tyredandhungry.wordpress.com/

tiermat

  • According to Jane, I'm a Unisex SpaceAdmin
Re: Ribble Bikes
« Reply #21 on: September 23, 2008, 02:29:57 pm »
Could you get a compact chainset (34 teeth & 50 teeth) instead of a triple?  If you get a large enough range of sprockets at the back you should still be able to get the same gear ratios as a triple would give you.

According to the adverts in the comic, and online both the winter trainers are NOT available as compacts...
I feel like Captain Kirk, on a brand new planet every day, a little like King Kong on top of the Empire State

Re: Ribble Bikes
« Reply #22 on: September 23, 2008, 02:32:33 pm »
You've identified what is, for me, a major weakness. The gear range isn't good, with far too much at the top end. The main ring is a 52, only swopable for a 50. I don't think the small ring (39) goes any lower.

Anyone know what the range of a Tiagra changer is?

Is it a Shimano 130mm PCD chainset ? If so you'll get a rings as small as 38 on.

Re: Ribble Bikes
« Reply #23 on: September 23, 2008, 02:39:33 pm »
Could you get a compact chainset (34 teeth & 50 teeth) instead of a triple?  If you get a large enough range of sprockets at the back you should still be able to get the same gear ratios as a triple would give you.

130PCD, comes with a 39 ring.

The Tiagra rear will cope with a 27-tooth sprocket, so the potential is there. However, Tiagra 9spd cassettes only go up to 26afaik.  How do you calculate the total range? Is it the maximum diff between chainwheel and sprocket? Or is it the difference between the total number of teeth? E.g (52+25)-(39+13)=25, using extreme chainlines. Reality would be (52+23)-(39+14) =22.
22 happens to be the quoted 'range' for Tiagra.

A 14 - 27 tooth cassette would be a Very Good Thing. How many riders actually use 11 or even 12 with a 50tooth crank?
<i>Marmite slave</i>

clarion

  • Tyke
Re: Ribble Bikes
« Reply #24 on: September 23, 2008, 02:48:32 pm »
Could you get a compact chainset (34 teeth & 50 teeth) instead of a triple?  If you get a large enough range of sprockets at the back you should still be able to get the same gear ratios as a triple would give you.

According to the adverts in the comic, and online both the winter trainers are NOT available as compacts...

I noticed that, and thought it was a bit daft.  As I say, I'd still prefer a triple, so I'm pretty sure they won't be getting £400 I can't afford, but, if that's what you're in the market for, it's a bargain.
Getting there...