Author Topic: Trek Domane  (Read 30697 times)

Re: Trek Domane
« Reply #25 on: August 14, 2013, 07:42:25 pm »
 Nice Selle SMP you've got there  ;D

Re: Trek Domane
« Reply #26 on: August 14, 2013, 10:24:10 pm »
I have to say, it looked very handsome in the sunlight in Essex towards the end of LEL.

Re: Trek Domane
« Reply #27 on: August 19, 2013, 01:52:03 pm »
Ooh, doesn't the 2014 4.5 look great - the striping does the trick of making of longer than it is.


Re: Trek Domane
« Reply #28 on: September 27, 2013, 11:48:08 pm »
So the list of jobs has got shorter and the new Trek has done just over 200 miles. Yes it is comfortable but more importantly it handles well and is very responsive. I feel much more confident riding in a group as it handles so well. One thing pre purchase that concerned me was the gearing being higher than I was used to, but combined with being lighter and better spec than my previous mount this has translated into slightly higher average speeds. Overall very pleased.

Re: Trek Domane
« Reply #29 on: December 13, 2014, 05:50:08 pm »
I'm trying to find images of methods for attaching mudguards to the upper rear vanishing mounts on the Domane Disc models which have no brake bridge between the seatstays, as shown in the lefthand photo below. Does Trek provide a special attachment with the bikes?


LEE

  • "Shut Up Jens" - Legs.
Re: Trek Domane
« Reply #30 on: December 13, 2014, 05:58:05 pm »
I think they do supply something but forums are full of "what the *** am I supopsed to do with them?" questions.

I have some Raceblades that I'll fit over Christmas.  I'll post photos if I get them to fit OK.
Some people say I'm self-obsessed but that's enough about them.

urban_biker

  • " . . .we all ended up here and like lads in the back of a Nova we sort of egged each other on...."
  • Known in the real world as Dave
Re: Trek Domane
« Reply #31 on: April 20, 2015, 12:05:06 pm »
I'm trying to find images of methods for attaching mudguards to the upper rear vanishing mounts on the Domane Disc models which have no brake bridge between the seatstays, as shown in the lefthand photo below. Does Trek provide a special attachment with the bikes?



I only just got my Domane 4.0 disc, but here is a pic of what is supplied. The plastic brake bridge is for the rear. Looking at clearances I'm pretty sure that I can get a set of full SKS 35mm guards on the disc version and have heard of others doing this. It has a lot more clearance than the rim brake versions.








Owner of a languishing Langster

urban_biker

  • " . . .we all ended up here and like lads in the back of a Nova we sort of egged each other on...."
  • Known in the real world as Dave
Re: Trek Domane
« Reply #32 on: April 20, 2015, 12:08:46 pm »
I'm loving mine (2015 4.0 disc). More comfortable than my steel tourer and the lightest bike I own.



The addition of my brooks saddle has improved it as well :-)
Owner of a languishing Langster

T42

  • Old fool in a hurry
Re: Trek Domane
« Reply #33 on: April 20, 2015, 12:57:20 pm »
...It seems to turn crappy English lanes into smooth French tarmac...

Y'what???  Sometimes I druther be in Italy.
I dare eat all that may become a man.

But hold the oysters.

Re: Trek Domane
« Reply #34 on: October 08, 2015, 12:48:15 pm »
I've got the Domane  (pronounced Dough-Mar-Knee apparently ::-)) 2.0 with triple chainset and 10-speed Tiagra. I've upgraded the stock brakes to Tiagra's, which improved the braking. I'm quite impressed by it. I won't be putting mudguards on mine, but I could. It's a tasteful black and white colour scheme. Not especially light but sturdy and quick.

I have to sadly report that the frame on my Domane 2.0 has cracked. It's 3 years old and has done about 10,000 miles. There's a weld about 2 inches below the Isospeed joint on the seat tube and it has cracked at the weld. Trek offer a lifetime guarantee  on their frames, so it's currently back with the shop to see if they'll honour the warranty. I've heard of at least 2 examples of the same thing happening, so beware the Alu Domane, it seems to have a design fault.
Sherwood CC - Squadra Giallo Verde


LEE

  • "Shut Up Jens" - Legs.
Re: Trek Domane
« Reply #35 on: October 08, 2015, 03:01:48 pm »
I've got the Domane  (pronounced Dough-Mar-Knee apparently ::-)) 2.0 with triple chainset and 10-speed Tiagra. I've upgraded the stock brakes to Tiagra's, which improved the braking. I'm quite impressed by it. I won't be putting mudguards on mine, but I could. It's a tasteful black and white colour scheme. Not especially light but sturdy and quick.

I have to sadly report that the frame on my Domane 2.0 has cracked. It's 3 years old and has done about 10,000 miles. There's a weld about 2 inches below the Isospeed joint on the seat tube and it has cracked at the weld. Trek offer a lifetime guarantee  on their frames, so it's currently back with the shop to see if they'll honour the warranty. I've heard of at least 2 examples of the same thing happening, so beware the Alu Domane, it seems to have a design fault.

Interested to see photos.

I have the carbon frame so it's easier to lay down the carbon to support a point of stress/flex, and retain flex/compliance, than it is to engineer Alu to do the same.

I'd like to see where the crack is and what the carbon structure looks like at the same point.
Some people say I'm self-obsessed but that's enough about them.

Re: Trek Domane
« Reply #36 on: April 16, 2016, 11:03:24 pm »


Go on then, I'll add mine to the thread.

Standard 2016 Domane Disc 4.5 with an Aliante saddle, an Ultegra chainset, Bonty 28mm AW3 HC Lite tyres (love these - the wet weather grip seems amazing, and they are relatively cheap), and matt SKS Bluemels. The shop took measurements of my Madone, and set it up the same. That meant a stem swap, a slammed headset cap, 42mm bars.

So far, I am enjoying it a lot. The stiffness the thru axles bring is amazing. The comfort from the big tyres and flexy seat tube is reassuring on Leeds' potholed roads.

BTW if anyone else with OCD and discs is unhappy about the position of the thru axle lever when closed, here's an easy guide to sorting it.

http://www.bike-manual.com/brands/trek/om/road/whl_qr_qr15.htm

Short version - with the thru axle tight, undo that Allen bolt you can see. It just removes the lever. Twirl the lever where you want it closed, and retighten the bolt. Open and close the lever to make sure you are happy with the tightness. Job done.

Ben T

  • Viable.
Re: Trek Domane
« Reply #37 on: April 17, 2016, 10:18:23 am »
You've got 28mm tyres and mudguards on it?  :o they must have improved that then because my domane you can only fit mudguards on it with 23mm tyres and even then it's a very tight fit.
What year/model is yours?
I'm definitely right over this.

Re: Trek Domane
« Reply #38 on: April 17, 2016, 04:42:24 pm »


Go on then, I'll add mine to the thread.

Standard 2016 Domane Disc 4.5 with an Aliante saddle, an Ultegra chainset, Bonty 28mm AW3 HC Lite tyres (love these - the wet weather grip seems amazing, and they are relatively cheap), and matt SKS Bluemels. The shop took measurements of my Madone, and set it up the same. That meant a stem swap, a slammed headset cap, 42mm bars.

So far, I am enjoying it a lot. The stiffness the thru axles bring is amazing. The comfort from the big tyres and flexy seat tube is reassuring on Leeds' potholed roads.



That is so very pretty. Once I have this gert big frame-destroyer off my leg, I may flutter my eyelashes at you to be allowed a brief go? I can feel a "glad to be well" present from myself coming on.... ;D

Re: Trek Domane
« Reply #39 on: April 17, 2016, 05:04:37 pm »
You've got 28mm tyres and mudguards on it?  :o they must have improved that then because my domane you can only fit mudguards on it with 23mm tyres and even then it's a very tight fit.
What year/model is yours?

2016 4.5 disc. Will take 32s with guards according to mechanics. Certainly with 28s there is very generous clearance with guards a at least one size down from what will fit.

The new SLR will take 35s with guards, apparently. With 32s there's vast clearance.

@CL - When you are recovered, definitely! It feels really bombproof. Very much looking forward to the commute tomorrow.

Re: Trek Domane
« Reply #40 on: April 17, 2016, 05:10:59 pm »




@CL - When you are recovered, definitely! It feels really bombproof. Very much looking forward to the commute tomorrow.

 ;D ;D  I fancy a go now, but I'll scratch the frame!  :P

Re: Trek Domane
« Reply #41 on: April 18, 2016, 07:43:59 pm »
So impressed with it so far - love the way you don't need to worry hammering through the potholed bits. Tried an emergency stop. You can do seated stoppies with 2 fingers. Rest of the time, one finger is plenty - the brakes and sticky tyres are fabulous. Compared to my old ali bike, it's wonderfully silent. I just wish it was about 3kg lighter, with 300g lighter wheels. I suspect the slr 7 disc is mega. However, even with a £4800 price tag, it's 8.6 kg compare to 8.95 kg for mine before guards and crap. That wasn't the point though - this is meant to be a fun commuting bike, and it is that in spades.

LEE

  • "Shut Up Jens" - Legs.
Re: Trek Domane
« Reply #42 on: May 01, 2016, 07:43:31 am »
Just fitted Raceblade Mk2 Mudguards to mine (there's no clearance for full guards on the non-Disc version with 25mm tyres)

I also used a CRUD-guard accessory from the parts bin.  The rear "Nose" attaches perfectly to the Raceblade bracket to provide an excellent shield for the seat tube and font mech.  Much better than the ineffectual part from the Raceblades.

Some people say I'm self-obsessed but that's enough about them.

Re: Trek Domane
« Reply #43 on: May 09, 2016, 09:56:45 pm »
Currently looking at a Domane SLR 6 or 7, the bottom bracket is the BB90 - has anybody here had issues with them ?
I have previously read of problems but to what extent is difficult to quantify.

They ride well, very comfy, lightweight + discs and great clearance for guards. - it will be my first venture away from steel so pressfits are a new thing to me.

Re: Trek Domane
« Reply #44 on: May 09, 2016, 11:36:22 pm »
Firstly, I have to say, isn't the SLR a special thing? So much tech that Trek have put in to it. Really impressive.

I've got BB90 on my previous and current Madone. The first did 2300km before a BMW pulled a uturn in from of me. The second has 7300km on it. I also have a aluminium Trek with a press fit BB. It's on 15800km on its original bearings. Lastly, I have a Trek Stache with press fit BB and 2500km on it.

I wonder what's going on with people who have press-fit problems, but not enough for it to put me off. No problems here. They've proven more hardy than my Hope Pro3 rear hub.

Do you like the isocore bar on the SLR? I do, but some of the guys in the shop say it's too flexy. Certainly, it can be yanked about when you are sat still, but what that means for steering, I don't know. They've offered me a 30 day trial.

Will you go for 32 or 35mm tyres? My LBS has sold 3 already. I'd be very tempted to trade in the wheelset before it left the shop and get the money off some Aoelus 3.

http://pelotonmagazine.com/goods/bontrager-tubeless-aeolus-review-images-weight/

Don't they sound like they'd go wonderfully on a SLR6?

Re: Trek Domane
« Reply #45 on: May 12, 2016, 12:34:17 am »
I only had a fairly short test ride on a slightly bigger size than I need, but it felt good - absorbed the bumps well and the slider was far from the most compliant setting - never really seem to find any big potholes when you are looking for them !
Didn't notice the bars too much, so that is a good sign - but it climbed well and felt smooth -  needed a longer ride to fully test, as with any strange bike it takes some getting to grips with everything.
Don't think I can look at upgrading the wheels as already  at top of my budget and will settle for the 6 (Black stealth) rather than the 7 (with DI2)- will run the 32's to start and probably convert to tubeless 28 Pro ones later.
Will have guards fitted and change to 32T rear to suit local hills/age !!
Hope to have another look at weekend - need to hide credit card !

LEE

  • "Shut Up Jens" - Legs.
Re: Trek Domane
« Reply #46 on: May 12, 2016, 08:35:11 am »
The owner of our local bike shop rides the new SLR and he has his choice of practically anything he wants.
Some people say I'm self-obsessed but that's enough about them.

Re: Trek Domane
« Reply #47 on: May 12, 2016, 10:56:43 am »
My lowly Domane disc 4.5 came with a 32T on the back. I didn't break sweat on the Heartbeat 400. 34/32 is lovely. Spin spin spin and save your knees.

I don't think the 6 is settling - I think it's the sweetspot. I look forward to hearing how crazy compliant it is on full squish. The reviews are saying it can switch from Emonda stiff to ~20% more squishy than mine. I'm running 85psi with 28s at the back, and it's ridiculously plush. I love it so much. The SLR6 comes with the big finned pads. I found on my MTB that the braking with them was much improved when bedded in. It's hard not to dump mine and just get them. I think yours has the upgrade disc calipers too. I suspect that 1 finger braking will be nothing short of phenomenal. I find I've always got more stopping power than I need, which is lovely.

The idea of the bike as a commuter bike for me was to ensure that I make the most of the commute. Its delivering that in spades. I'm sure the SLR will be a delight.

LEE

  • "Shut Up Jens" - Legs.
Re: Trek Domane
« Reply #48 on: May 12, 2016, 01:16:04 pm »
I've used my Domane on every qualifier for PBP and PBP. 
It has sidelined my Condor Fratello Triple (my previous go-to comfy long-distance ride).

The Domane frame makes up for the lack of a granny Chainring (squishy over bumps and yet super stiff thru the drive-train).

It holds all my Strava PBs, many of which I wasn't even trying for, it just covers ground effortlessly.
Some people say I'm self-obsessed but that's enough about them.

Re: Trek Domane
« Reply #49 on: May 13, 2016, 05:56:29 am »
Effortlessly - that's s great word for it. The way it just glides over everything with no fuss; the way it calmly descends and turns in to a corner. The disc brakes mean if you over cook it, hauling it back in can be done effortlessly to.

It's really thrown me, this bike. It was meant to be my "ride it hard, but it away wet" commuting bike, albeit one that encouraged me to ride more. In fact, I'd pick it over my 7.2kg Madone for almost anything.

The only thing I could accuse it of is that it has no pop or fizz. It's a perfect bike for endurance - spin away in z1-3 - all good. Tired? It's geometry will keep you tracking straight. However, if you are in a group and that guy on the front keeps surging and dropping people, this isn't the bike you want to keep giving a kick on.

What's throwing me is that it's so lovely for everything else, could light wheels (sub 1500) give it that pop and fizz? But then why throw money at a commuting bike?

I know I'll use there Domane for my 600. Whether I do for Mille Pennines depends whether my mate Tom is going to keep kicking.

My LBS is trying to arrange loan of some Aoelus 3 disc wheels- 1450g and fancy carbon with DT hubs. I'm already thinking I'll pull the carbon pedals and post from the Madone...

It's an amazing bike. I went top 4/>4000 on a strava segment nodescending Norwood Edge without trying too hard yesterday. It's so confidence inspiring.

It is a hell of a bike for long distance.