Author Topic: Trek Domane  (Read 30889 times)

Re: Trek Domane
« Reply #50 on: May 16, 2016, 06:45:55 pm »
Well I didn't hide my credit card too well !
SLR6 (black stealth) ordered (last 520 size currently available), however the bike size fitting showed that I need the short reach Isocore bars and they are not available until mid June - so a bit of a wait but I'm sure it will be worth it and I'm having a full fitting  when it is ready - reach is always now my problem to get a comfortable position - no head down positions anymore !

Yes the brakes have the finned pads /discs, however I think they are the 140mm size - my Croix de Fer has the hydraulics but 160mm - I'm quite light so still lots of stopping capacity !

Looking forward now to trying it out !!!


Re: Trek Domane
« Reply #51 on: May 26, 2016, 05:05:36 pm »
I think you'll love it. It is very covetable.

So, to create a racier position on a Domane, remove stem, spacers and headset top assembly cap, and replace with.

1. Cane Creek 40 zero stack top cap (friendly shop may give it to you)
2. a 17deg Elite stem, flipped

Result



Feels much more like my Madone now. I think I did the whole of the Heartbeat on the drops, even climbing, Hopefully this should bring the hoods in to play.

tippers_kiwi

  • Audax, what's that then? Oh!
    • The Road beyond PBP 2015
Re: Trek Domane
« Reply #52 on: May 26, 2016, 06:19:42 pm »
Love my Domane as well. It's the same 4.3 as Lee did PBP on (I think) with after market wheels etc. I also did all my qualifiers and PBP on it and a whole season of Audax before that because that was my bike and I have to say I always felt like I made the right choice when I bought it.

Since buying my Genesis Croix Stainless I have de-audaxed the Domane and I am really enjoying it as the lightweight of my bikes but as everyone says....it's still super comfy.

IJL

Re: Trek Domane
« Reply #53 on: May 26, 2016, 06:53:25 pm »
Everyone seems happy with their Madone so I have finally taken the plunge on a 4.3 with discs, apparantly there is a new update to the range coming soon.  Hopefully the weather will be good for the weekend and ill be able to get some miles in over the next few weeks, its going to serve as my audax bike so will gain 'guards at some point

IJL

Re: Trek Domane
« Reply #54 on: June 02, 2016, 01:38:39 pm »
I have only just noticed that the forks don't have a 'guard mount on the side with the brake, is there a bracket available that uses the brake mounting or is it a DIY job?

Re: Trek Domane
« Reply #55 on: June 02, 2016, 07:19:33 pm »
Have you looked at the Trek web site - you can download various manuals.

The Domane 2016 has a section on fitting guards, for disc forks it notes :-

' require use of an angled bracket adapter that mounts between caliper bolt head and the disc brake caliper. Position eye bolt so it is perpendicular to the ground'

HTH

I'm still waiting for mine !

IJL

Re: Trek Domane
« Reply #56 on: June 02, 2016, 08:28:32 pm »
Thanks for that, ill get in touch with the shop and see if they can get one,  I assume it was meant to come with the bike, all the other bits did, including a couple of mystery widgets.

Re: Trek Domane
« Reply #57 on: June 13, 2016, 06:17:16 am »
My shop did a lovely job of shaping the mudguard stay so that the it can be attached behind the top caliper bolt - looks really tidy.

After 2500km, I have to say, I love this bike. I was coming down the hill from Harewood at about 65kph and thought to myself - I could sit up and take my hands off the bars it's so stable. I finished a recent 600 and didn't feel beaten up. The relentless brakes, the comfy rear end, the surefooted handling and the plush ride make it perfect for audax. It also feels bombproof - no concerns about hurling it down gravel strewn lanes. Everything just works. It feels really tough, but exceptionally comfortable. Nothing has needed adjusting yet. I washed it for the first time yesterday. It's a cracking piece of kit.

BTW - I'm similarly enamoured with the Bontrager AW3 HC Lites that the shop swapped on for me. They are cheap, and not the lightest, but the grip - wet or dry - exceeds the Vittoria Evo Paves I've been spending my pension savings on, and they seem to be lasting really well - none of the cutting up I'm used to on soft, grippy tyres.

Re: Trek Domane
« Reply #58 on: June 13, 2016, 03:36:36 pm »
I also love my Domane, mines a 2014 4.5
interested in the post about the mudguards does anyone know if you can purchase the angle bits to fit the little bolt holes?
One day I'll be able to put that veloviewer thing in here. E=62 SR=1

Re: Trek Domane
« Reply #59 on: June 22, 2016, 08:48:28 pm »
Took my Domane Disc in for its 6 week service - a bit late in that it's done 2858km. Mechanics know I've got Mille Pennines coming up and I gave permission for them to change anything that needed it or might need it in the next thousand plus km.

Nothing.

Not bad for a bike that has been washed once, and only had the chain wiped down and lubed as required.

So far, all it's cost me is a swap of tyres for Mille Pennines as I wanted to try some lighter tyres.

Chap that sold it to me said he's seen how much I've enjoyed it and has put his Emonda SLR up for sale to fund a Domane Disc SLR 6.

I will be jealous.

velosam

  • '.....you used to be an apple on a stick.'
Re: Trek Domane
« Reply #60 on: August 05, 2016, 04:13:56 pm »
I am curious about this bike and reading the reviews there has been some suggestion that the front feels a lot harsher than the rear, due to not having a similar system.

Is the front harsher etc or does it feel disjointed compared to the rear? (Note this would be on the cheaper version as opposed to the newer updated one, on which some of them do have a front coupler)

thanks

Re: Trek Domane
« Reply #61 on: August 05, 2016, 05:30:00 pm »
I really don't know what they are on about. The front end just isn't harsh. The whole bike feels completely coherent to me. The back end has it's magic trick of taking the sharp edges of potholes, and the front doesn't. However,my arms are much more able to cope than my arse, so I don't feel like the front is acting in a way that's inconsistent.

My mate has the SLR. In his view, the new bikes trickery is primarily through the new bars, not the front decoupler, but even more of it is via having 32mm tyres. I'd be amazed if anyone found the normal Domane harsh - if you did, the damped bars and 32s would be cheaper than a SL (non adjustable back, decoupler front) or SLR (adjustable read and decoupler front). In the US, taking the S6 (the non adjustable back end, no front decoupler) as a base, the SL is another $800, and then the SLR is $1500 more than the SL ($2300 up from the S). Weight is pretty much the same.

The SLR 6 disc that my mate has is lush, but despite how similar they look, his is nearly double the price of mine.

citoyen

  • Cat 6 Racer
Re: Trek Domane
« Reply #62 on: August 05, 2016, 06:58:22 pm »
I would definitely say that the bars on the old Domane were pretty stiff and that I felt it in my hands after 600km. 'Harsh' might be overstating it though.

I've been up to Trekworld today and had a look at the new SLR. It's lovely. I'm hoping to get one in to play with very soon. As you say, the 32C tyres are going to be a hugely significant factor - and it can take up to 36C, apparently. For me, that gives it the kind of versatility that can compete with bikes like the Genesis Datum.

The adjustability of the SLR is perhaps a bit of a gimmick. I'm sure the non-adjustable SL would be fine for most people.

velosam

  • '.....you used to be an apple on a stick.'
Re: Trek Domane
« Reply #63 on: August 06, 2016, 01:07:53 pm »
Cheers for that.  Maybe one day I will bite.

Re: Trek Domane
« Reply #64 on: August 06, 2016, 11:43:28 pm »
I wonder if the difference in perception might be that I'm on the disc version? I have arms like a small child, so the alternative hypothesis that you have princess & the pea arms seems unlikely.

Guys in my lbs are saying that they'd been told it's all good as a gravel bike with big tyres. I still think a Tripster would be what I'd want, or even an Open.

citoyen

  • Cat 6 Racer
Re: Trek Domane
« Reply #65 on: September 05, 2016, 06:49:03 pm »


Haven't ridden it properly yet - just a quick spin round the block - so far too soon to make any meaningful assessment of the differences with the old Domane. First impressions are very favourable though. I love the fat tyres (even if they do have tubes in) - inflated them to 75psi but might try them a bit lower.

Spent most of today getting it set up. Still could do with lowering the bars a bit, and would ideally like to fit some mudguards. The brake hoses could definitely do with being shortened too.


Re: Trek Domane
« Reply #66 on: September 05, 2016, 08:21:31 pm »
I replaced the headset top cover with a normal (non volcano) one and flipped the stern. That combo brings the stern down to Madone levels. I've gone as low as f60/r70psi - just brilliant over chipseal.

citoyen

  • Cat 6 Racer
Re: Trek Domane
« Reply #67 on: September 05, 2016, 08:27:09 pm »
I've gone as low as f60/r70psi

You probably weigh a good 10kg less than me though.

Re: Trek Domane
« Reply #68 on: September 05, 2016, 11:28:17 pm »
That's my bike !

I've had mine for a good few weeks now, initially got off to a really bad start with the Bottom bracket bearings needing replacement after about 34 miles ! - I think there was an installation issue at the factory - LBS were sending back to Trek for review. This was my main concern with a press fit and this has not helped develop any confidence in the system.

However the ride is great - I think the adj rear decoupler does help take out the bumps (mine is now at the soft setting also) and the carbon iso bars have nearly stopped the occasional numb l/hand - I've got the short reach bars.

I keep the pressures about the 70 mark and it bowls along very smoothly and fast with the big tyres also climbs very well - frame seems stiff.

What wheels are on the bike - the red logo's look different in the pic - mine are the Affinity Comps.

citoyen

  • Cat 6 Racer
Re: Trek Domane
« Reply #69 on: September 06, 2016, 06:14:42 am »
That's my bike !

 :thumbsup:

Quote
I've had mine for a good few weeks now, initially got off to a really bad start with the Bottom bracket bearings needing replacement after about 34 miles !

That's slightly worrying since I'm setting off for a long ride this weekend...

Quote
What wheels are on the bike - the red logo's look different in the pic - mine are the Affinity Comps.

Affinity Comps here too.

Re: Trek Domane
« Reply #70 on: September 06, 2016, 01:04:03 pm »
Is it just me, or have Trek effectively made a carbon touring bike (obvs faster and without the load-carrying capability as consequence of the frame material)? Longish wheelbase, 72 degree head angle, tallish front end, plenty BB drop, etc, etc... the geometry is pretty much exactly the same as any 1980's "fast tourer" or a Surly LHT.

Have we just come full circle?

[pseuds corner]
Or is this actually convergent evolution? Something evolved from the road bike, and ended up looking much the same as something that evolved from utility machines?
[/pseuds corner]

citoyen

  • Cat 6 Racer
Re: Trek Domane
« Reply #71 on: September 06, 2016, 01:08:37 pm »
All bikes are hybrids now!

LEE

  • "Shut Up Jens" - Legs.
Re: Trek Domane
« Reply #72 on: September 06, 2016, 01:52:32 pm »
Is it just me, or have Trek effectively made a carbon touring bike (obvs faster and without the load-carrying capability as consequence of the frame material)? Longish wheelbase, 72 degree head angle, tallish front end, plenty BB drop, etc, etc... the geometry is pretty much exactly the same as any 1980's "fast tourer" or a Surly LHT.

Yes they have.

I have one (see above somewhere) and it changed my plan on taking my Steel Condor to PBP last year.

The geometry is what most people need, despite it not looking as "Pro" as a full on road bike (which is what people tend to want when they see one).

It's as comfy as my Condor, the front end isn't harsh at all, the front axle is mounted behind the line of the forks to add compliance/flex.  The back end is de-coupled...AND YET...the drive train (Bottom Bracket and chain stays) components are huge.

The more power you put through it, the more you honk it up steep hills, the more you notice the benefits of that Brunel-like power train.
It's comfy and yet covers ground so much faster than my other "comfy" bikes.
Some people say I'm self-obsessed but that's enough about them.

T42

  • Old fool in a hurry
Re: Trek Domane
« Reply #73 on: September 06, 2016, 04:17:00 pm »
Only quibble I have is that the matt black finish is very easy to damage.  I had the list of PBP control times taped to the top tube, and it's still a bit shiny where the tape was.  I wouldn't use it off-road for that reason, flying gravel would make a fair mess.
I dare eat all that may become a man.

But hold the oysters.

Re: Trek Domane
« Reply #74 on: September 06, 2016, 05:25:46 pm »
I had the Bontrager mudguards fitted by the LBS as part of the deal (and 32 cassette) for some reason the 32 is standard on the SLR7 ? (DI2 version)- although they spaced the rear guard off the seat tube at the fixing point, the front mech still pushed against the guard - so I've drilled an approx 10mm hole in the guard so the extreme end of the mech now clears.

Agree the geo is not extreme and is not much different to my 2015 Croix de Fer 30 (now my winter bike) but I climb at least one gear higher on the same hills.