Author Topic: 2023  (Read 8681 times)

Re: 2023
« Reply #50 on: 27 January, 2020, 11:23:30 am »
If When I do 2023

I have been wasting effort on some models, average speed, time at controls, eating, sleeping etc and as I am pretty full value I looks a bit daunting to keep up an adequate pace so have to work at everything, faster on bike, less time off bike.

The queuing does concern me as I am not fast enough on the bike to allow time to queue. Other than the essential getting card stamped is it practical to otherwise skip a control if there are queues, will I find food etc elsewhere that will be faster.

Also I am fairly much a big sleeper so this is going to be something I have to train to better manage. Everyone is different I guess but is it best to plan (longer) sleep stops or just take shorter as needed.

Fading is also something I have to work on, will look into a HR strap.
Ride more than plan:
Guard against the inclination to spend time planning which could be spent riding, this year, next year and in 2023 (NB hello pot, this is kettle!)
Speed as well as endurance:
Take care to ride shorter distances faster, as well as (or even instead of) long rides. And if you haven't got time for a long ride, nevertheless get out and have some (faster than normal) fun.
Reducing stop times:
After an audax or other longer ride, analyse the stop times and see if you can identify minor things to change to reduce time stopped. And then make those changes.
Queuing and feeding:
Don't fuss about the queuing. The control desks were very efficient. Water bottle filling at some controls was good: others less so - I suspect that will be better in 2023 [Edit to add: But always better to stop and fill up at a pop-up rather than waste time at a control, balanced against losing a group going at an acceptable speed.] And there's plenty of options for food elsewhere - and plenty of advice on here about that. Have courage to stop at cafes and pop-ups. Definitely the best food I ate. Quality coke and chips at 5 in the morning - Gorron; and a family (with AC Bristol connections) pop-up just north of St Meen le Grand around Monday lunchtime (400k-ish); and a delicious ham and pasta mix at Ambrieres-les-Vallees in the heat of Wednesday afternoon (followed by an hour's kip on white sheet covered mattress under an awning in their garden). 3+ years to learn a bit more French, perhaps.
Sleeping:
As you say: everyone is different.
HR Monitor:
I use one (and have done since 1980 for most physical exercise, both training and racing (running/orienteering). Reviewing data is interesting, particularly interval sessions. As @Phil w says, it can be used as a restraint on pushing too hard when there's a long way to go, and a visible (numerical) indicator when you're loafing.
HTH

FifeingEejit

  • Not Small
Re: 2023
« Reply #51 on: 27 January, 2020, 01:25:43 pm »
Don't fuss about the queuing. The control desks were very efficient. Water bottle filling at some controls was good: others less so - I suspect that will be better in 2023. And there's plenty of options for food elsewhere - and plenty of advice on here about that. Have courage to stop at cafes and pop-ups. Definitely the best food I ate.

I spent far too much time at controls, not controlling but eating and other stuff all of which can be done elsewhere.
Understanding the different types of shops found in rural France is I think a massive help.

Also... Coca... no more bad cocaine jokes after asking for coke...

Re: 2023
« Reply #52 on: 20 August, 2020, 10:25:02 am »
Well up thread in January I rashly proclaimed my intention to front up for a first PBP in 2023, then late February a bad bike accident (on a 150, hit by a truck), 6 weeks in hospital, more broken bones than I thought existed, 4 months off bike and a slower than expected recovery, biggest ride since only 75 km but lots of 50s and now http://www.pbpresults.com/ is today proclaiming "3 years 0 months 0 days until 20th edition of PBP", assuming a Sunday 20/08/2023 start I guess.

Fortunately I think it's still possible for me, no injury below waist and 3 years is enough but no wriggle room in the preparation schedule, got my distraction out of the way early and coincidently with the peak Covid distractions (as long as it doesn't return and is long gone before 2023). Of course some finishers say they went from zero to finish in a year but I don't think I am in that class.

Good luck to the class of 23, see you there.

simonp

Re: 2023
« Reply #53 on: 20 August, 2020, 12:33:38 pm »
Well up thread in January I rashly proclaimed my intention to front up for a first PBP in 2023, then late February a bad bike accident (on a 150, hit by a truck), 6 weeks in hospital, more broken bones than I thought existed, 4 months off bike and a slower than expected recovery, biggest ride since only 75 km but lots of 50s and now http://www.pbpresults.com/ is today proclaiming "3 years 0 months 0 days until 20th edition of PBP", assuming a Sunday 20/08/2023 start I guess.

Fortunately I think it's still possible for me, no injury below waist and 3 years is enough but no wriggle room in the preparation schedule, got my distraction out of the way early and coincidently with the peak Covid distractions (as long as it doesn't return and is long gone before 2023). Of course some finishers say they went from zero to finish in a year but I don't think I am in that class.

Good luck to the class of 23, see you there.

I hope the recovery process goes well. You have a long time to build up the miles. Good luck!

Redlight

  • Enjoying life in the slow lane
Re: 2023
« Reply #54 on: 20 August, 2020, 04:46:37 pm »
Fortunately I think it's still possible for me, no injury below waist and 3 years is enough but no wriggle room in the preparation schedule, 

I have every confidence that you can do it. My injuries were nothing when compared to yours but I was off the bike and on crutches for the first half of 2014 following a smash and I rode PBP comfortably in 2015. I eased my way back into medium distances in the winter of 2014 and rode only one 600 in order to qualify the following spring. If you don't push yourself too hard at the start, I am sure you will be fine.
Why should anybody steal a watch when they can steal a bicycle?

Re: 2023
« Reply #55 on: 25 August, 2020, 05:39:52 pm »
Plenty of time to recover and build your fitness and endurance back up over the next few years.  Be prepared to ride a 400 or 600 if not an SR in 2022 as part of pre qualification.

Re: 2023
« Reply #56 on: 25 August, 2020, 08:31:43 pm »
Well up thread in January I rashly proclaimed my intention to front up for a first PBP in 2023, then late February a bad bike accident (on a 150, hit by a truck), 6 weeks in hospital, more broken bones than I thought existed, 4 months off bike and a slower than expected recovery,

Ouch! Bad luck. Hope the recovery goes as well as it can.

You've got loads of prep time for PBP. But good to start now. Slowly.

Others may well disagree, but as a full value rider myself [10 yrs junior], I'd be wary about getting too attached to plans and schedules. It's all very well having the idea that it's a bad idea to waste time at controls, but circumstances will dictate what you actually end up doing at the end of the day. If you've been riding through the night and it's been tipping it down, arriving at a control might feel like you've made it to heaven. So....you sit down, gobble food, put your head in your hands....and surface an hour later - which could easily eat away at any time you may have in hand. It's easily done....and is arguably better than pressing on when you're feeling a bit dodgy.

It's all a delicate balancing act between time and sleep.....and it gets more intense and stressful as the event unravels.
That's the beauty of being a full value rider - the beauty is deeply embedded in the stress :-)

See you there....[err...possibly.....looks at booze consumption!!]
Good luck
Garry Broad

Re: 2023
« Reply #57 on: 26 April, 2021, 03:14:29 pm »
Out of nowhere the itch came today to consider 2023. Thoroughly enjoyed my first one in 2015 and always said I'd return someday. Could well be the next one ...
The other Robw, not the wobbly one

Re: 2023
« Reply #58 on: 11 May, 2021, 07:27:02 pm »
I live between Ambrières-les-Vallées and Gorron, two towns on the PBP route. Both husband and me are cyclists (in a very small way) and if we are still breathing at the time of the next PBP (one never knows!) we will certainly be about for food/drink/sleep/bathroom etc at the time.
Loving life in France (53 - Mayenne)

Re: 2023
« Reply #59 on: 12 May, 2021, 05:31:13 am »
I live between Ambrières-les-Vallées and Gorron, two towns on the PBP route. Both husband and me are cyclists (in a very small way) and if we are still breathing at the time of the next PBP (one never knows!) we will certainly be about for food/drink/sleep/bathroom etc at the time.

Great stuff - hope to get a chance to see you. I vaguely remember Gorron from 2015 - we may even have met then!
The other Robw, not the wobbly one

Re: 2023
« Reply #60 on: 12 May, 2021, 09:56:06 am »
Word up and I honestly don't know how this affects anyone doing PBP, but it may be something to be aware of Due to the B word and I don't mean brevet, as new rules apply to Brits visiting France. Less than 90 day stay you don't need a visa but you do need other things. Full details on the French government link below - in English.

https://brexit.gouv.fr/sites/brexit/accueil/vous-etes-britannique-en/modalites-de-voyage-en.html

I post this not to alarm but just in case it affects you.
Loving life in France (53 - Mayenne)

Re: 2023
« Reply #61 on: 12 May, 2021, 10:15:19 am »
I have a dream (no name is not Martin) that I can participate in 2023, will be my first and likely only chance but with, (according to pbpresults.com), only 2 years 3 months 8 days to go I am starting to have fears that it's not going to happen or travel from this far flung part of the Oz world is going to be difficult and expensive, assuming our benevolent government will let me out and back in, they are currently saying borders will remain mostly closed till mid 2022, wanting to ride my bicycle in France may not be considered sufficient excuse!.

Will France want 6,000 cyclists from all over the world, will ACP be able to pull it off given given who knows what new requirements for feeding, controlling and sleeping all those people, talk about a super spreader event,  I guess I just have to keep training and hope.

Additional friendly faces on the route will be most welcome if I make it there. Been riding the 2019 route on my smart trainer in 3-4 hour chunks, almost up to Ambrières-les-Vallées so will keep an eye out for you, can't really see what the fuss is, hasn't been too difficult so far.

PS got my first vaccine shot today, no side effects so far so that's positive.

Redlight

  • Enjoying life in the slow lane
Re: 2023
« Reply #62 on: 12 May, 2021, 10:53:28 am »
Will France want 6,000 cyclists from all over the world, will ACP be able to pull it off given given who knows what new requirements for feeding, controlling and sleeping all those people, talk about a super spreader event,  I guess I just have to keep training and hope.

I think ACP will move heaven and earth to stage the event, out of pride as much as anything else. A lot will depend on how some of the forthcoming big pro sport events, such as the Olympics and the football European Cup, go and whether they have a demonstrable impact on infections (I know the Olympics are going to be closed to foreigners). I imagine they will also look closely at how London-Edinburgh-London is run next year and consider whether any new measures that the organisers take can be applied to PBP too.  IMO, the LEL organisers put a much greater emphasis on rider wellbeing and safety, so there may be much for ACP to learn.

As you say, just keep up the training and hope for the best, even if it turns out to be PBP2024!
Why should anybody steal a watch when they can steal a bicycle?

Re: 2023
« Reply #63 on: 12 May, 2021, 11:09:10 am »
I think a lot will also depend on two further factors. 
1. A successful rollout of vaccinations around the world, not just in France
2. No further new variants of Covid that could make the vaccine's less efficient

Re: 2023
« Reply #64 on: 12 May, 2021, 11:33:13 am »
Word up and I honestly don't know how this affects anyone doing PBP, but it may be something to be aware of Due to the B word and I don't mean brevet, as new rules apply to Brits visiting France. Less than 90 day stay you don't need a visa but you do need other things. Full details on the French government link below - in English.

https://brexit.gouv.fr/sites/brexit/accueil/vous-etes-britannique-en/modalites-de-voyage-en.html

I post this not to alarm but just in case it affects you.

Basically get health insurance, leave your ham'n cheese sarnies behind (to be replaced by sandwich jambon emmental when over the border) and don't forget the bike! Chief limitations for holiday makers are not importing controlled foodstuffs and having adequate health insurance (isn't there a card issued in UK now for overseas health care? Being on the other side i ignore that side of things!) It may be that you should take proof of UK purchase/prior ownership of various items to avoid problems with British Customs on the way home (and check up on your allowances - the days of 200 bottles of wine under the floor of the Fiesta are gone).

I get the regular UK Govt updates on living in France and they really are quite helpful - for travellers as well as residents.

This does not allow for whatever vaccination passports/other sanit(ar)y controls will be in place in two years time.

Re: 2023
« Reply #65 on: 12 May, 2021, 11:45:51 am »
It's not just leave your sarnies back in Old Blighty.

You need proof of medical cover (the EHIC no longer valid) including cover in case of repatriation on death IIRC, proof of where you are staying, proof of duration of stay, proof you have enough money to support yourself (with minimum requirements).

It's standard stuff for visiting from countries which are not in the EU, but as this is now a new situation for Brits after years of hassle-free travel in Europe, it may have been forgotten as to what is needed now.

Edit: I will leave it at that so the post doesn't get moved to elsewhere  ;D
Loving life in France (53 - Mayenne)

Re: 2023
« Reply #66 on: 12 May, 2021, 12:17:33 pm »
You need proof of medical cover (the EHIC no longer valid)

Thew new exciting GHIC is valid in the EU (but not the rest of the EEA or any other part of the Globe):
https://www.gov.uk/global-health-insurance-card

Redlight

  • Enjoying life in the slow lane
Re: 2023
« Reply #67 on: 12 May, 2021, 03:37:11 pm »
It's not just leave your sarnies back in Old Blighty.

You need proof of medical cover (the EHIC no longer valid) including cover in case of repatriation on death IIRC, proof of where you are staying, proof of duration of stay, proof you have enough money to support yourself (with minimum requirements).

It's standard stuff for visiting from countries which are not in the EU, but as this is now a new situation for Brits after years of hassle-free travel in Europe, it may have been forgotten as to what is needed now.

Edit: I will leave it at that so the post doesn't get moved to elsewhere  ;D

I very much doubt the majority of Brits - and, especially, the Brexit-loving media and figureheads - will be fully aware of how onerous the French requirements, if fully enforced, are. I'm thinking particularly of the requirement for anyone who invites you to stay in their home as a guest to obtain a certificate from the town hall well in advance of your visit and send this to you to be produced at the border if requested.  Given that, in normal times, I visit my godchildren and their mother in France two or three times a year, this could be a right PITA. Realistically, I'm not expecting that rule to be enforced on arrivals from the UK - I suspect it's aimed more at the country's immigrant communities and their family members - but one can never be too sure what the French might do if our imbecile of a PM pisses them off again.

No doubt, when the Brexiteers do catch on, these rules will be presented as being "new rules" being imposed on us poor Brits by vengeful foreigners.  ::-)
Why should anybody steal a watch when they can steal a bicycle?

Re: 2023
« Reply #68 on: 12 May, 2021, 03:57:28 pm »
It's not just leave your sarnies back in Old Blighty.

You need proof of medical cover (the EHIC no longer valid) including cover in case of repatriation on death IIRC, proof of where you are staying, proof of duration of stay, proof you have enough money to support yourself (with minimum requirements).

It's standard stuff for visiting from countries which are not in the EU, but as this is now a new situation for Brits after years of hassle-free travel in Europe, it may have been forgotten as to what is needed now.

Edit: I will leave it at that so the post doesn't get moved to elsewhere  ;D

EHIC remains valid till it expires.

Re: 2023
« Reply #69 on: 12 May, 2021, 06:14:32 pm »


I very much doubt the majority of Brits - and, especially, the Brexit-loving media and figureheads - will be fully aware of how onerous the French requirements, if fully enforced, are. I'm thinking particularly of the requirement for anyone who invites you to stay in their home as a guest to obtain a certificate from the town hall well in advance of your visit and send this to you to be produced at the border if requested.  Given that, in normal times, I visit my godchildren and their mother in France two or three times a year, this could be a right PITA. Realistically, I'm not expecting that rule to be enforced on arrivals from the UK - I suspect it's aimed more at the country's immigrant communities and their family members - but one can never be too sure what the French might do if our imbecile of a PM pisses them off again.

No doubt, when the Brexiteers do catch on, these rules will be presented as being "new rules" being imposed on us poor Brits by vengeful foreigners.  ::-)

Exactly. I urge anyone wanting to come to visit France checks the French government website to see what the *French government* is saying is now necessary.
Loving life in France (53 - Mayenne)

Re: 2023
« Reply #70 on: 12 May, 2021, 07:16:44 pm »


I very much doubt the majority of Brits - and, especially, the Brexit-loving media and figureheads - will be fully aware of how onerous the French requirements, if fully enforced, are. I'm thinking particularly of the requirement for anyone who invites you to stay in their home as a guest to obtain a certificate from the town hall well in advance of your visit and send this to you to be produced at the border if requested.  Given that, in normal times, I visit my godchildren and their mother in France two or three times a year, this could be a right PITA. Realistically, I'm not expecting that rule to be enforced on arrivals from the UK - I suspect it's aimed more at the country's immigrant communities and their family members - but one can never be too sure what the French might do if our imbecile of a PM pisses them off again.

No doubt, when the Brexiteers do catch on, these rules will be presented as being "new rules" being imposed on us poor Brits by vengeful foreigners.  ::-)

Exactly. I urge anyone wanting to come to visit France checks the French government website to see what the *French government* is saying is now necessary.

Don't forget that we (the french and associated europeans) need your money so it is unlikely that we will be turning away respectable tourists (and the more BJ spouts off about take your holidays at home the more likely it becomes that M le Président will try to entice them over the Channel).

Re: 2023
« Reply #71 on: 12 May, 2021, 09:43:28 pm »
Most of those requirements technically exist whenever you've been on holiday anywhere outside the EU/EEA. Some of them may even have existed for trips within.

The number of obvious tourists who are ever asked to prove it must be miniscule.

(definition of Obvious Tourist left to the reader and the Peter Griffin colour swatch)

Re: 2023
« Reply #72 on: 13 May, 2021, 03:51:27 am »
As you say, just keep up the training and hope for the best, even if it turns out to be PBP2024!

I think it will be 2023 or much later, a Sunday 18/Aug 24 to Thursday 22/Aug 24 PBP would be right in the middle of the gap between the Paris 2024 Olympics and Paralympics, might be a stretch for the French organisational genius to have 3 world class events in such a brief span.

@French Waffles, the bridge at Ambrières-les-Vallées appears in many PBP rider videos, very nice section, looking forward to seeing it for real.