Author Topic: Laidback Vertical Storage  (Read 916 times)

Laidback Vertical Storage
« on: 19 April, 2021, 10:53:30 pm »
Living in a Birmingham terrace we have outbuildings featuring what probably used to be a coal shed between the house and the outbuilding toilet.  This is where I try and store as many of the bikes as possible, but how to store a Speedmachine and a Catrike?

Now, to add some hooks on the walls so that I can store a couple DFs at the same time ...
Strange things are afoot at the circle K.

Kim

  • Timelord
Re: Laidback Vertical Storage
« Reply #1 on: 19 April, 2021, 11:40:00 pm »
It's like having your very own CrossCountry Voyager...

(Hanging from the rear wheel is my preferred method for the Streetmachine in a dangly bike space.  The rear mudguard would be damaged if I tried to stand it like that.  There's a bit of a knack to getting it in and out...)
Careful, Kim. Your sarcasm's showing...

Re: Laidback Vertical Storage
« Reply #2 on: 20 April, 2021, 12:10:32 am »
I assumed that all that teutonic steel and machinery would preclude actual hanging from the wall - or would do bad things to the bike.
Strange things are afoot at the circle K.

Kim

  • Timelord
Re: Laidback Vertical Storage
« Reply #3 on: 20 April, 2021, 12:15:50 am »
IME it mostly does bad things to the person trying to hoik it into position in a confined space.
Careful, Kim. Your sarcasm's showing...

Re: Laidback Vertical Storage
« Reply #4 on: 20 April, 2021, 09:29:04 am »
That too!

I have a slightly shorter rear mudguard due to it having broken in the past and generally being a bodge job.  The key point for it is leaning the bike on the rear rack onto the blocks of wood.  This way the bike is supported on the back wheel, rear rack and front wheel leaning against the wall (has moment of pause because: Physics), which I feel is better than the bike pulling up on the wheels.
That said if the hook holds onto the wheels by the rim (not spokes) then half the weight on each rim should be okay as they must have at least that load with a rider on it (though compression not tension).
...
Anyway, I am less convinced by my ability to mount hooks into a wall that could hold 15kg without ripping out.
Strange things are afoot at the circle K.

Cudzoziemiec

  • Моя планета голубая, я люблю тебя и обнимаю
Re: Laidback Vertical Storage
« Reply #5 on: 20 April, 2021, 09:38:10 am »
It's like having your very own CrossCountry Voyager...
lolz!

It's obvious, but "with extremely good security" would be my answer.
Riding a bike through a city is like navigating the collective neural pathways of a vast global mind.

Kim

  • Timelord
Re: Laidback Vertical Storage
« Reply #6 on: 20 April, 2021, 11:44:32 am »
I have a slightly shorter rear mudguard due to it having broken in the past and generally being a bodge job.  The key point for it is leaning the bike on the rear rack onto the blocks of wood.  This way the bike is supported on the back wheel, rear rack and front wheel leaning against the wall (has moment of pause because: Physics), which I feel is better than the bike pulling up on the wheels.
That said if the hook holds onto the wheels by the rim (not spokes) then half the weight on each rim should be okay as they must have at least that load with a rider on it (though compression not tension).
...
Anyway, I am less convinced by my ability to mount hooks into a wall that could hold 15kg without ripping out.

Yes, cunning use of a Useful Bit Of Wood™, there.

My take on dangling by the rim is that the bike frame isn't going to be bothered, but the rim might.  I rebuilt the Streetmachine's rear wheel after a couple of years because it was cracking around the spoke nipples.  No idea if that was train-related, or just too much spoke tension or what.  The replacement has a much better rim with eyelets, which has some cosmetic scuffing but remains structurally sound.

My only other bike that's done dangling train journeys has similarly sturdy wheels, and has never had a problem.

Of course, if you're hanging it for storage, you can pad the hook with something soft, and it's not going to be swinging around like it would on a train, so much less load.
Careful, Kim. Your sarcasm's showing...