Author Topic: Mille Pennines 6th July 2018  (Read 110439 times)

Re: Mille Pennines 6th July 2018
« Reply #1000 on: January 12, 2018, 05:15:28 pm »
Asked permission to wife last night... a sound "NO"... will try again in a few weeks... need bargaining chips...

Re: Mille Pennines 6th July 2018
« Reply #1001 on: January 13, 2018, 09:21:22 am »
Is a mattress guaranteed regardless of the number of entrants or is it a case of first come first served/time limited like in BCM?

Re: Mille Pennines 6th July 2018
« Reply #1002 on: January 13, 2018, 12:50:27 pm »
Bottle, badge etc arrived, thank you very much Andy!

Andy Corless

  • Doesn't take the p***, says it as it is!
Re: Mille Pennines 6th July 2018
« Reply #1003 on: January 15, 2018, 05:06:26 pm »
"Is a mattress guaranteed regardless of the number of entrants or is it a case of first come first served"

There shouldn't be a shortage of beds this time. IIRC we had more than enough in 2017.

Andy Corless

Re: Mille Pennines 6th July 2018
« Reply #1004 on: January 19, 2018, 11:54:27 am »
Andy - many thanks for my brevet card, badge and waterbottle which arrived in the post this morning.
I had written up a report which I now share. Apologies for its length  :)

Experience and Lessons from 2016
   In 2016, I bailed at Newcastleton (461km). Poor progress in poor weather for first 11 hours of Day 2 – why? Poor Night 1 sleep at Askrigg (supine but little sleep on airbed 0130-0500); 360km to do Day 2 meant a further 201km to do at 5pm Sat (after 150km ridden in 11 hours, with prospect of strong headwind over high ground: Newcastleton to Lockerbie). Had taken too long on Day 1 – too much time stopped and (time) inefficient feeding.  Needed to ensure no overmatching (“it’s too much”) during the 1000km. In 2016, Day 4 (100km) was short and not good use of hours left (a 13:00 deadline allows 9 hours of daylight riding).
•   Needed to balance days especially D2 and D4 (which meant not defaulting to sleep at central control
•   Needed a feeding plan (ie where to eat well)
•   Less stopping and swift stops otherwise
Pre-start
•   Drafted route out.
•   Completed SR (Mad March, Old Roads, BC, BCM)
•   Refined route as new info arrived: Askrigg to Sedbergh control change (fortnight to go) and removal of Lockerbie as a control (3 days to go).
•   Arranged overnight stops (not Sedbergh)
Drove north on Thursday (from Devon) to the Dales, via Sedbergh to suss out the layout, the school and shop/ATM location. Thursday overnight at Hardraw (on the route at about 280km) then back to Bispham am Fri leaving bed made, towel ready, change of socks and overnight stuff and breakfast makings at Hardraw, ready to use late that night.
Day 1
Andy Corless (the organiser) sent us away at 10:00 and I joined one of the front carriages of the train. Diverted on my own route past Hambleton and its advantage found me briefly in front of all. Grouped with John Sherwood and wingman Paul for run from Cockerham through Lancaster and Carnforth (with my route hacks which JS and Paul followed despite my encouragement not to) to Arnside (11:57 - 30kph). They stopped for a pasty at the Old Bakehouse: I controlled in the Londis shop and cracked on. Alone through Bowness (A5074) till Ambleside then tagged onto small group with Rich Evans ‘in control’ steaming up Dunmail Raise, putting up with a little white Fiat with Italian plates who seemed to delight in close passes of me and all those in front. Down into Keswick: others stopped for a pasty at Greggs but I had resolved to sit down at Kat’s Kitchen (veggie), by Keswick Bikes, imm before bridge out of town).  Sat down outside (right by the road) and cheered a fair few riders through, consuming quickly served beans on toast (with self-added pepperoni slices) and coffee.
     Pressed on (was there a shower?) to Braithwaite and up the climb to Whinlatter Pass (passed by a couple and passing a couple of riders) and controlled in the Forest Info Centre/Shop (Siskins café would take too long and I’d just eaten). Left with a fast young guy on his first long audax he’d earlier led us up Dunmail Raise on his power meter “I know how much I can do” (I privately wondered how this threshold would drop in the coming days)) and took a (route hack) fell road bypassing High Lorton, with him agreeing to stick to the routesheet. Arrived at the junction to see him go past – I’d had to open/close two gates - but excellent to prove route choice validity (or not). I chased him down and we rode together. I had struggled to get my front derailleur cable right (despite last minute efforts) and lost the chain as we climbed to Fang Brow: he went on. Good ride down to Ennerdale Green and then misty/damp over Cold Fell – light on front and back (meeting scores of commuters from Sellafield who’d ended their shift at 4pm) with riders in sight in front and behind (when the mist lifted). Swift descent into Calder Bridge (with brakes truly tested on the Z bends as we entered the village) and then a 2 mile dash along the main A595 before turning off at Gosforth down to Seascale and its Post Office (to control) and Coop for food (Scotch eggs and milk). Had been looking forward to a pizza (which had been quick and tasty in 2016) but the place had shut. Tried to keep the stop snappy – a dozen other riders (including Rich Evans) arrived while I was there (about 5pm – 175km in 7 hours). Besides my food stops I’d been grazing on a mixture of flapjack cubes, cut up ‘chewy’ biscuits, salted cashew nuts and raisins, plus a few bananas. Legs and contact points all feeling OK – which was good because the passes about to come would test them.
     Out of Seascale, through Drigg, across the A595 and into Eskdale. The ‘Esk Fest’ was starting that evening so more cars on the road than ‘normal’.  Passed the festival site and began the assault of Hardknott Pass: 200km had just clicked past on the Garmin. I had swapped out my inner chainring (triple) replacing the 30t with a 28t and also fitted a 12-30 cassette (vice the normal 12-27) and in this 25” gear, together with the knowledge of having got up last year, reached the top in one. Forearm clenching descent down the hairpins, thinking “I’m glad I’m not climbing up from this side” (scroll forward to 2018 – we are). Lovely run down to Cockley Beck and after Hardknott, Wrynose Pass is ‘easy’ with another smooth run down to Little Langdale. Nearly got taken out by a car coming the other way: the driver seemed to have decided that they could get round a corner faster by using the whole road: only catch was – I wanted a couple of feet of tarmac/edge by the stone wall on my side. I stayed clear of the wall and he missed me, but not by much. Felt strong going through Ambleside and up past Windermere; pushing on for Kendal where I planned to stop for fish and chips. But when I got into town, with a little route hack down the river bank cycle path to cut out the one way system detour, I decided that, since the Sedbergh control was only 25km away and there’d be good food ready there, I was better saving time and finish off my grazing food (anticipating resupply in drop bag at the control) and pressing on, so up the hill out of Kendal it was, just before 8pm. This climb seemed easier than in 2016 and once under the M6, a smashing descent to the Lune valley and across the flat to the control at Sedbergh School – it was still light when I arrived (21:30). The setup was superb - we were lucky to count among the Mille Pennines riders the school’s headmaster (Andrew Fleck) who had kindly helped engineer these arrangements: a dining room area with adjoining kitchen/servery and an adjacent gym for serried airbeds (which I never entered btw), with changing rooms and showers.
     As planned I ate well, replenished my grazing bag, fixed my lights and just after sunset rode on over Garsdale Head to Hawes – the next control. Alone (and ‘first’ – I think) on the road, and feeling privileged to be so, the full moon was up and magically squeezed between the ridge and the low clouds. The ATM in Hawes main street was ‘out of order’ so I went into a pub to get a PoP. It was just after closing time. “What shall I put?” asked the feisty barmaid of the ‘The Board Inn’ when offered my brevet card. “Just write something interesting,” I suggested – so she wrote “Something interesting” in a clear hand. Ha ha! – and she added time and pub name  and I took the pub’s card from the bar. On out of Hawes and (after a few extra km after missing the turn) across the valley to Hardraw (the hamlet at the bottom of the Buttertubs Pass climb) and Hardraw Bunkhouse which I’d left 16 hours before. Punched in the door code, wheeled the bike into the hall, grabbed a shower, got the porridge soaking and the electronics charging, and got my head down before midnight – I planned 4+ hours of sleep on a comfortable bed under a warm duvet - and fell asleep. 280km in 13½ hours.
Day 2
Up at 0415 (sunrise) and after a really good breakfast, away at 0524 (disappointed I could not be ready quicker). Just a mile along to the bottom of the iconic (as in Tour de France/Yorkshire) ‘Cote de Buttertubs’ and up that (with only sheep for company: bit surprised no one in sight ahead or behind – I’d expect to fall in with some 4 o’clock starters from Sedbergh) – a steady climb of 271m in 5km and then down to Thwaite. I’d decided to take the high road up to Tan Hill (and off road) and then via Bowes rather than down to Low Row and via Barnard Castle so along to Keld, with a cheeky climb out of the village there and up Stonesdale Beck to the Tan Hill Inn.  East over the high moor and then left down Sleightholme Moor byway/track – fair going with the odd rough bit – for 4km before tarmac at the farm. Remote road on to Bowes, and then north through Cotherstone and Romaldkirk, across Teesdale, up and over to Stanhope (control) where finally signs of audax life presented as bikes parked outside the Co-op.  I had resisted the temptation to save 2km and be bold and cross at the ford – one rider did (met subsequently), and slipped/fell on the weedy concrete surface, and got both bashed and wet in the process. Too early for the ‘Durham Dales Centre’ and the Everyday Café was just opening.
   Controlled at the Coop and headed up Crawleyside: destination Parkhead Station Café (as recommended by DC). Cooked breakfast there and back out on the road. Lack of attention in ‘egg and baked bean’ euphoria resulted in me missing the immediate turn to Blanchland and descending a prolonged hill, before I thought “this isn’t quite right”. Turned at Edmundbyers to cut back across – 5km of extra cycling – but a lovely road: dipping in and out of the woods surrounding Derwent Reservoir. Up and over to Hexham where I route hacked west along the B6531 to short of Fourstones (avoiding the A69 dual carriageway and slightly shorter) and north towards Bellingham. Going well: the sun was out and not much wind. Next stop was just E of Kielder dam: the Old School Tearooms at Falstone (as recommended by DC)) where I had a quick egg and bacon bap – the village is 700m north off the Kielder road.  Lovely ride along the road past Kielder Reservoir, passing a rider lying in the sunshine – saw him later (in Langholm?). Controlled at the Kielder village store and rode in company for the miles round to Newcastleton and bought a bit more food in the Spar there. By now late afternoon, there’s a good climb out of Newcastleton and then a well surfaced road with extensive views south over the Solway Firth to the Northern Fells, thence across the wilderness to Langholm – where I controlled at the RBoS ATM.
   Had some company on the A7 (with mini-diversions) to Carlisle but my feeding plan was to get fish and chips in Carlisle: (Fontana's on the London Road, opposite Asda) so they went on. Swiftly served, I could sit outside and watch the odd rider go through, including ElliptiGO-riding Tim Woodier, whom I had yo-yoed with since Kielder. Completing my last chips, a rider went through and I jumped up and chased him down. The pace of Will Vousden from Didcot seemed just right and we headed down the A6 in company, controlled at the first garage in Penrith just as the sun set (about 9:15) and pressed on towards Shap. We would have made good progress to Sedbergh and got there before midnight (Will did) but I had arranged a bed close to the A6 near Shap. So I bad farewell and peeled off. Arrived at the B&B at 10pm, grabbed a bite to eat and slept from 11 till 03:30. 276km that day in 16½ hours
Day 3
On the road at 04:12 (sunrise, though it was overcast): mild, quiet and a gentle dawn light which meant the miles rattled off to Sedbergh. Did myself no favours in the Lune valley after Tebay by taking a dead-end turning to a farm, wasting 15 minutes. Most of the riders had left Sedbergh when I got there so grabbed some cereal and toast and set off in ‘chasing mode’ for Yarm (about 100k hence) up the now familiar Garsdale Head road. Through Askrigg (central control in 2016) Wensleydale was glorious, albeit with the sun in your eyes. Climbed out of the valley after Redmire and headed for Catterick/Richmond. Rather than heading NE for Richmond I had resolved to route hack through Catterick Garrison and across the temporary cycle/ped bridge over the A1(M) improvements (on the line of the A6136) to Catterick Bridge. Stopped at a garage there for some food and milk, to strip off, and to apply sunscreen. Across the flat Vale of York to Yarm; and controlled in the Levington Grange Prison Café (as recommended by DC) having made good time.
   The day was heating up. Headed east through Seamer, Stokeley and Easby into the North York Moors and into the head of the Esk valley (the second ‘Eskdale’ of the ride). Now normally a road goes down the valley: not this one. We seemed to be switchbacking like some skiing half-pipe with each of the climbs of ‘chevron’ quality. Rode, loosely, with two others for this stage through Castleton and Danby all the way to the A171 where there was a fair bit of traffic.  We were quicker than the Sunday cars down the hill into the Whitby outskirts and then out and up to Robin Hood’s Bay. Stopped at the village shop there for some food and milk and then dropped down to the Fish Box – fast, quality fish and chips in the blazing sunshine. About a dozen riders were there when we arrived but by the time we’d eaten just three of us remained. Probably spent a bit too much time there but super fuel.
   The next 26km has 816m of climb, with 15 chevrons, some doubles – enough said. Littlebeck (concrete slabs), Sleights, Grosmont, Egton. I found the climb out of Egton Bridge up Smith’s Lane the hardest but got up each climb without stopping (25” bottom gear length) – so very pleased with that. Wearing road cleats added to my motivation: I think if you’re on SPDs, walking/pushing up hill is not so much of a deterrent. Stopped for a break to enjoy the isolation on a warm stone seat when on the high moor and then dropped down into Rosedale Abbey – with an early view of the ‘Chimney Bank’ opposite. Steeply down into the valley and even more steeply out with multiple 1:3s round the Z bends – no cars to interfere with my choice of line – so cracked that too. Waited for a pusher at the top and we rode together to Hutton-le-Hole where I stopped to fill bottles at The Crown, and enjoyed a swift half and a very comfy chair in the cool (compared to outside) bar. Alone down to Kirkbymoorside for a burger at Star Fast Foods and milk from the Coop.
   There was a group of about 7 here (a few OTP I believe), who had left before me from Robin Hood’s Bay, and were content to let me join them – very welcome company on this third long evening. We rotated round, which gave me a chance to chat with nearly everyone (and Will Vousden was in this group too (last seen at Shap 22 hours ago)). Past Helmsley we paused at a junction where there was an option to take a slightly shorter and minor roads (Wass, Coxwold, Hutton Sessay) route to Ripon but the consensus was: traffic is light and the navigation easier (in the dark now) – let’s stick to the main road (A170). Swooped down Sutton Bank and shot across the vale to Thirsk where the group paused to allow the donning of some extra clothing – the temperature had dropped after the light went. Through and out of Thirsk on the A61 for the 20km to Ripon: the next control, which we reached about 11pm – controlled at the 24 hour garage/Spar. Again faced with a dilemma: I had arranged accommodation in Ripon but was with a good group which would go well all the way to Sedbergh, albeit arriving at 3 in the morning. But I had cycled an additional 2+ hours that day (compared to them – starting from Shap not Sedbergh) so I stuck to my plan, bad them farewell, and found my adjacent accommodation (in the dark) first time (my careful pre-event Google Streetviewing paid out its dividend). Shower and bed by 23:30 for 3 hours bed sleep. 299km that day in 19½ hours.
Day 4
I wanted to be away by 3am: that would give me 10 hours to ride a hundred miles – to the finish in Bispham, via Sedbergh, to finish by the 1300 deadline. In the event I hit the road at 03:12 (after a bowl of porridge and a coffee) and from then on kept a beady eye on the ‘Average Speed’ window on the GPS display – I needed to get and keep it above 17kph (including stops). A couple of steady hours riding in the cool of pre-dawn - I took the Grewelthorpe road out of Ripon and then on the A6108 through Masham and Middleham and back into Wensleydale. 850km in the last 3 days meant I felt increasingly weary – I needed the ‘homeward leg’ syndrome to kick in without much further delay. After a dramatic ‘shepherd’s warning’ sunrise, a steady drizzle set in with a bit of a head wind. The A684 was hillier than I expected (or felt like it anyway) and I was grateful to swing across to the northern side of the valley at Bainbridge, stopping at Hardraw Bunkhouse (my bed for Friday night) to swap on a pair of dry socks (the ones I’d used on Friday), which I’d pre-positioned there Saturday morning (under a log). The warm drizzle came and went and it was a speedy run down to Sedbergh after the climb to Garsdale Head (our third visit). What I assumed were the last couple of riders were about to set off as I got there just before 8am (Rich Evans and ?Dave) but I wanted some food so could not bounce through and off (with them). Andy Corless was away transporting most of the drop bags (mercifully not mine though) but there was unlimited Weetabix and coffee available, thanks to the last volunteers who were tidying up. Just as I left another pair of riders came in – I don’t think they’d slept.
   With the pressure on to keep the average speed up (my average speed was now below 16kph) I didn’t linger, replenished my on-the-go food from my drop bag (flapjack cubes, cut-up cookies, salted cashew nuts and ‘big’ raisins) and set off down the Lune valley to Kirkby Lonsdale. Crossed the old bridge there and rather than pressing on down the A683 (which becomes a ‘trunk road’ and gets very busy as you get towards Lancaster) took the B6254 ($ Carnforth) road (off routesheet) down the other side of the River Lune (same distance) taking the turn going through Halton and into Lancaster. Punched through the city and out on the Cockerham road (familiar from Friday morning). Since Sedbergh I had steadily increased my ‘average speed’ to the extent that I was now comfortable that I had a buffer in the event of error/puncture. Passed the pair of riders I’d seen as I left Sedbergh, taking clothing off (the rain had stopped before Lancaster) and they passed me when I stopped to do the same. Feeling ‘bold’ and with time now in hand I stopped at a shop for a bite and a pinta. Retraced our Friday route across the Fylde to Hambleton (route hack – going round on the A588 seemed too easy (and a km further)), across the River Wyre and took the now familiar route into the finish (mini route hack near the end to cut off a few more 100m). So at 1230 on Monday, with an elapsed time 74½ hours (time limit 75 hours), I’d finished. Hurrah! And the sun was shining. Last to finish, just – the pair ahead of me had just propped up their bikes when I turned in. 161km in 9¼ hours.

Stats:
Overall speed: 1016km in 74½ hours = 13.6kph
Average Speed ‘during the day’: 1016km in 58½ hours = 17.3kph
16 hours stopped ‘overnight’ of which 11½ hours sleeping
Route errors at Hawes (Fri night (3km), Sat noon Edmundbyers(!)(5km), Sunday 5am Tebay (3km)
Extra for accn: 2km+8km+4km
Route Hack distance savings (net): maybe 8km

Andy Corless

  • Doesn't take the p***, says it as it is!
Re: Mille Pennines 6th July 2018
« Reply #1005 on: January 20, 2018, 01:31:51 pm »
Nice write-up! Is there a PDF available anywhere as (with your permission) I'd like to add it to the MP1K website?

Andy Corless

Re: Mille Pennines 6th July 2018
« Reply #1006 on: January 20, 2018, 04:18:54 pm »
Andy
I will send you a pdf.

Andy Corless

  • Doesn't take the p***, says it as it is!
Re: Mille Pennines 6th July 2018
« Reply #1007 on: January 26, 2018, 03:50:01 pm »
"I will send you a pdf."

Thanks for that. I'll add it to the list this next week!

Andy Corless

miyataman

  • think of something funny
Re: Mille Pennines 6th July 2018
« Reply #1008 on: January 27, 2018, 09:48:31 pm »
Hi Andy,  the brevet card, the water bottle and the metal thingy (what's the word for it?) arrived today. Thank you very much! I have really good memories of the ride.
Unfortunately, I won't be able to ride next year. We are setting up our first 1200km brevet in Berlin this year: Berlin Wien/Vienna Berlin:
https://berlinwienberlin.wordpress.com/category/english/
So if anybody is interested, there are cheap flights to Berlin with Uneasyjet. The website is in English and German. Registration opens end of January.

Ralf

mattc

  • "Hannibal"
  • n.b. have grown beard since photo taken
    • Didcot Audaxes
Re: Mille Pennines 6th July 2018
« Reply #1009 on: January 28, 2018, 06:40:59 pm »
Hi Andy,  the brevet card, the water bottle and the metal thingy (what's the word for it?) arrived today. Thank you very much! I have really good memories of the ride.
Unfortunately, I won't be able to ride next year. We are setting up our first 1200km brevet in Berlin this year: Berlin Wien/Vienna Berlin:
https://berlinwienberlin.wordpress.com/category/english/
So if anybody is interested, there are cheap flights to Berlin with Uneasyjet. The website is in English and German. Registration opens end of January.

Ralf
Hi Ralf,
(We talked a bit about rides on the continent, and I stared at your Miyata in amazement).
Looks like an interesting ride. You probably won't see me, as:
- Sleezyjet are not a real airline, and
- I hope to be riding a slightly longer german brevet this year :)

Anyway, i think your event is worth it's own thread. I won't distract Mille Pennines fans anymore, but there are some great bits on that website:

(click to show/hide)
Has never ridden RAAM
---------
No.11  Because of the great host of those who dislike the least appearance of "swank " when they travel the roads and lanes. - From Kuklos' 39 Articles

miyataman

  • think of something funny
Re: Mille Pennines 6th July 2018
« Reply #1010 on: January 28, 2018, 10:41:33 pm »
Hi Mattc,
you happen to be one of the 2 guys Oliver and I had dinner the evening before the start or did we just have a wee chat in Sedbergh? I am hopeless with names andyway,..
You ride Hamburg- Berlin-Köln-Hamburg this year? I never did it, but me impression is it's a well organized ride (those Germans...) :)

Andy Corless

  • Doesn't take the p***, says it as it is!
Re: Mille Pennines 6th July 2018
« Reply #1011 on: February 13, 2018, 04:17:19 pm »
"Unfortunately, I won't be able to ride next year."

That's no problem! After this year's edition the event will next likely run in 2020! There'll be no MP1K in 2019!

Andy Corless

Andy Corless

  • Doesn't take the p***, says it as it is!
Re: Mille Pennines 6th July 2018
« Reply #1012 on: March 14, 2018, 04:12:03 pm »
It's a while now since my last communication so I thought I'd give a quick update. The event information and final control details will be confirmed around the first week of April but the route-sheet will probably be the 3rd - 4th week of April as parts of the route need re-checking.

Entries still open due to some cancellations.

Andy Corless

Re: Mille Pennines 6th July 2018
« Reply #1013 on: March 17, 2018, 03:24:25 pm »
1st year I was a DNS due to injury. 2nd had family stuff. 3rd I told the misses to stuff the family I'm doing it! Looking forward to this one. Going to do a warm up at Easter that should put me in good stead  :demon:

Andy Corless

  • Doesn't take the p***, says it as it is!
Re: Mille Pennines 6th July 2018
« Reply #1014 on: March 26, 2018, 04:14:34 pm »
1st year I was a DNS due to injury. 2nd had family stuff. 3rd I told the misses to stuff the family I'm doing it! Looking forward to this one

Looking forward to seeing you on the event at long last.

Andy Corless

Andy Corless

  • Doesn't take the p***, says it as it is!
Re: Mille Pennines 6th July 2018
« Reply #1015 on: May 04, 2018, 08:43:40 am »
Quick update. The event info' and route instructions are just about ready. However (the usual 'however'), I need to go over a few bits before its issued so it's probably going to be another week to 10 days. In the meantime, John Rye has kindly compiled a GPS track for the provisional route and is attached.

www.ridewithgps.com/routes/24491995

Andy Corless

GrahamG

  • Babies bugger bicycling
Re: Mille Pennines 6th July 2018
« Reply #1016 on: May 04, 2018, 04:07:26 pm »
I'd love to do this, but think I'm better taking baby steps with my first sr in five years rather than subbing a benign 600 with this monster. Glad it's full.
Brummie in exile (may it forever be so)

Andy Corless

  • Doesn't take the p***, says it as it is!
Re: Mille Pennines 6th July 2018
« Reply #1017 on: May 04, 2018, 06:38:03 pm »
It isn't full yet - entries are still being accepted.

Andy

GrahamG

  • Babies bugger bicycling
Re: Mille Pennines 6th July 2018
« Reply #1018 on: May 04, 2018, 09:24:24 pm »
That does surprise me, well I've cleared it with the wife, just need to ponder whether it's a good idea with a 400 as the longest ride in the lead up.

Will planted the seed by mentioning it at the pub the other night, I'll have to look in to logistics too.
Brummie in exile (may it forever be so)

Andy Corless

  • Doesn't take the p***, says it as it is!
Re: Mille Pennines 6th July 2018
« Reply #1019 on: May 04, 2018, 11:39:45 pm »
Event website at: www.millepenninesaudax.com

Andy Corless

Re: Mille Pennines 6th July 2018
« Reply #1020 on: May 08, 2018, 04:52:51 pm »
This really appeals to me and scares me at the same time.

On Saturday I did the brevet cymru, reaching 240km (new quay) at 11hrs 10mins and 300km (llandovery) at 14hrs 35 mins. Is this in line with the required fitness for potentially finishing?

 
   E = 73  SR = 1

GrahamG

  • Babies bugger bicycling
Re: Mille Pennines 6th July 2018
« Reply #1021 on: May 08, 2018, 05:55:50 pm »
I think it's hard to say once you get into multiple days - far more chance of injury, mechanical or other unfortunates happening. I'm 'fit enough', just don't know if I'm durable enough. Can't help but feel that is even more crucial than fitness when you consider the extra stress/strain of the terrain.

Just entered myself, going to prepare as well as I can in 2 months, just a 400km along the way. I'm banking on yoga, Pilates and a big fat dollop of good luck.
Brummie in exile (may it forever be so)

Andy Corless

  • Doesn't take the p***, says it as it is!
Re: Mille Pennines 6th July 2018
« Reply #1022 on: May 08, 2018, 06:05:50 pm »
"On Saturday I did the brevet cymru, reaching 240km (new quay) at 11hrs 10mins and 300km (llandovery) at 14hrs 35 mins. Is this in line with the required fitness for potentially finishing?"

The Brevet Cymru has roughly the same amount of climbing per km as the Mille Pennines but the MP1K is run at a reduced minimum average of 13.3kph.

Entries still open. I'm presuming you're
aware of the event website: www.millepenninesaudax.com

Andy Corless


Re: Mille Pennines 6th July 2018
« Reply #1023 on: May 08, 2018, 11:06:24 pm »
This really appeals to me and scares me at the same time.
On Saturday I did the brevet cymru, reaching 240km (new quay) at 11hrs 10mins and 300km (llandovery) at 14hrs 35 mins. Is this in line with the required fitness for potentially finishing?
You came into Llandovery while I was there (trying to eat).
Last year I did the BCM Warmup (same route as BC under temporary RT custody) taking 10:30 to New Quay and 14:10 to Llandovery. Two months later (after a BCM (mid-May) in 36 hours with 5 hours bed sleep) I completed a full value MP1K (see report a short way upthread). So you're 'in line' but of course riders handle multiple days (with varying amounts of sleep) differently.
Last year on MP1K I did about 290k before stopping to sleep at Hardraw (in about 14 hours).
I think I'm correct in saying that in the two runnings of Andy's event, nearly everyone who has got back to the central control after the Scottish excursion (Day and Night 2), has gone on to finish, even those who've arrived after dawn. Sedbergh (2nd visit) control @ 597k 'closes' (it doesn't of course), at about 7am Saturday. Last year I left about that time (NB having had 4+ hours sleep both Thu and Fri nights).
On the last day, with the 2018 1100 start time, riders will have 10 hours of Sunday daylight for riding (or sleeping till 1000 then riding the flat 77k) to Bispham.
"The Brevet Cymru has roughly the same amount of climbing per km as the Mille Pennines" Figures don't lie even if . . .

Re: Mille Pennines 6th July 2018
« Reply #1024 on: May 08, 2018, 11:27:43 pm »


The Brevet Cymru has roughly the same amount of climbing per km as the Mille Pennines but the MP1K is run at a reduced minimum average of 13.3kph.


This is true, but the reduced minimum speed equates to only 8hours 20 minutes extra, which is less sleep than I would be having in an ideal world (5 hours per night by preference).

m gain per km doesn't tell the whole story either. As lots of 20% climbs  with flat bits between is harder than half th3 ride at 2.5%up and the other half at 2.5% down.
   E = 73  SR = 1