Author Topic: G. W. Bacon maps  (Read 1588 times)

Wowbagger

  • Dez's butler
    • Musings of a Gentleman Cyclist
G. W. Bacon maps
« on: October 29, 2020, 06:08:26 pm »
OK, not GPS at all, but related.

I've been doing some tidying up and I've come across a beautiful map of Kent that I've never really looked at in detail before, published by G. W. Bacon. https://www.dg-maps.com/gw-bacon.html refers.

Given that my mother hails from Kent, and that the last maps produced by Bacon were in 1922, when she was 11 years old, I would guess that this was bought by her parents and accompanied them on cycling trips around the Garden of England. It really is rather lovely, although it has torn at the folds in a few places. In one corner, superimposed over quite a lot of Sussex, is a list of useful cycle routes, the longest of which, at some 71 miles, is London to Margate.

The scale seems to be something in the region of 9mm:1 mile and the map is divided into 5-mile squares. Longitude and latitude are shown in degrees and minutes - the map precedes the introduction of the National Grid by several decade.

I think I'm going to get it mounted and frames, and will give it to my Maidstone daughter.

Has anyone else seen any of Bacon's maps before?
Eating's a serious business. Don't bollocks around wagging your tail.

Cudzoziemiec

  • Eating all the pies and drinking all the tea.
Re: G. W. Bacon maps
« Reply #1 on: October 29, 2020, 06:12:40 pm »
Yes. I even have or have in the past had one or two. Cycling and motoring maps. I think I probably slightly prefer the cartography of Bartholomew's but Bacon's are also wonderful.

The scale seems to be something in the region of 9mm:1 mile and the map is divided into 5-mile squares. Longitude and latitude are shown in degrees and minutes - the map precedes the introduction of the National Grid by several decade.
That would be about 1 inch to 1.8km?
Riding a bike through a city is like navigating the collective neural pathways of a vast global mind.

Wowbagger

  • Dez's butler
    • Musings of a Gentleman Cyclist
Re: G. W. Bacon maps
« Reply #2 on: October 29, 2020, 06:20:13 pm »
...
That would be about 1 inch to 1.8km?

No - much smaller than that. 1 inch to about 4.8km.
Eating's a serious business. Don't bollocks around wagging your tail.

Cudzoziemiec

  • Eating all the pies and drinking all the tea.
Re: G. W. Bacon maps
« Reply #3 on: October 29, 2020, 06:21:44 pm »
Doh! I divided instead of multiplying.  :facepalm: ::-) :-[ Go straight to jail, do pass go and do not consult the map.
Riding a bike through a city is like navigating the collective neural pathways of a vast global mind.

Re: G. W. Bacon maps
« Reply #4 on: October 29, 2020, 08:57:29 pm »
...
The scale seems to be something in the region of 9mm:1 mile
...

3/8” to the mile?

Feanor

  • It's mostly downhill from here.
Re: G. W. Bacon maps
« Reply #5 on: October 29, 2020, 09:34:30 pm »
29 Knuts to a Sickle

Re: G. W. Bacon maps
« Reply #6 on: October 29, 2020, 11:04:12 pm »
I think I have a 100 year-ish old cycling map of Essex you might be interested in - I must dig it out and look at the details. I think it's a Batholomews map.
If it ain't broke, fix it 'til it is...

fuaran

  • rothair gasta
Re: G. W. Bacon maps
« Reply #7 on: October 30, 2020, 12:04:04 am »
There's a few available online at the National Library of Scotland. https://maps.nls.uk/mapmakers/name/Bacon
Seems some are 1 inch to 3 miles, or 1 inch to 6 miles. The oldest one specifies it is a scale of "English miles". Another one shows both "British Statute Miles" and "Geographical Miles".

Re: G. W. Bacon maps
« Reply #8 on: November 18, 2020, 07:44:13 pm »
That sounds fascinating, I'd love to see it.
Quote from: Kim
^ This woman knows what she's talking about.

Wowbagger

  • Dez's butler
    • Musings of a Gentleman Cyclist
Re: G. W. Bacon maps
« Reply #9 on: November 24, 2020, 11:15:46 am »
I have discovered another G. W. Bacon map in my possession. This is "Bacon's Motoring and Cycling Road Map of South Wales." although it doesn't show anywhere east of Cardiff. It's on cloth and has the name Eli Walker written on it. Eli was one of my great uncles who emigrated to the USA in the depression. He was born in New Tredegar (most of my dad's family were, it seems) on 3rd April 1891 and settled in Scranton (how topical!), where presumably he dug coal. I think he died in 1962 - I know he either left or gave some money to my dad in that year, with which he bought his first car.
Eating's a serious business. Don't bollocks around wagging your tail.

Cudzoziemiec

  • Eating all the pies and drinking all the tea.
Re: G. W. Bacon maps
« Reply #10 on: November 24, 2020, 11:29:54 am »
settled in Scranton (how topical!), where presumably he dug coal.
He could have worked for Penn Paper and Supply or possibly even Dunder Mifflin...
Riding a bike through a city is like navigating the collective neural pathways of a vast global mind.

Re: G. W. Bacon maps
« Reply #11 on: November 24, 2020, 11:34:47 am »
I have a cloth copy of 'Bacon's Road Map for Cycling and Motoring' for an area which covers a 30 mile radius round London.
I cannot find a date on it, but it contains an advert for shipping vehicles to the continent, which pictures what I think is a 1912 Rolls Royce being craned onto a boat. It has hand written notes in pencil, from an previous owner.

I also have a copy of Bacon's Guide to London with 'Maps, Sixteen Full-page Illustrations, and Route Guides'. This has a date of 1911 on it and, I guess, was the A to Z of its day. Buckingham Palace is pictured in the book, in its previous  guise - ie without the balcony on which they watch the fly-pasts from and an absence of columns and pediments. These were all added in 1913. Also, the shot taken of The City, looking north over London Bridge. The tallest structure is The Monument. That, and church spires.

Wowbagger

  • Dez's butler
    • Musings of a Gentleman Cyclist
Re: G. W. Bacon maps
« Reply #12 on: November 24, 2020, 12:37:40 pm »
That sounds fascinating, I'd love to see it.

Your wish...

https://photos.app.goo.gl/dW86KbmAf62ct22n9

I tried using the Google Photo embedding tool that Woolly posted a couple of months ago but was unable to make it work this time. Can't see what I'm doing wrong.
Eating's a serious business. Don't bollocks around wagging your tail.

Re: G. W. Bacon maps
« Reply #13 on: November 24, 2020, 12:53:58 pm »
Out of interest, what route does it offer for London to Margate?
Watling Street / Thanet way? Or something closer to the FNRttC Whitstable route?

Wowbagger

  • Dez's butler
    • Musings of a Gentleman Cyclist
Re: G. W. Bacon maps
« Reply #14 on: November 24, 2020, 12:59:22 pm »
I can't tell - I've dropped the map off at the picture framers this morning. I can't expand the image to read what it says. Maybe you can have a try.
Eating's a serious business. Don't bollocks around wagging your tail.

Re: G. W. Bacon maps
« Reply #15 on: November 24, 2020, 01:05:23 pm »
If you download it from your link, you can open it using Preview, and then zoom in to your heart's content.

Wowbagger

  • Dez's butler
    • Musings of a Gentleman Cyclist
Re: G. W. Bacon maps
« Reply #16 on: November 24, 2020, 01:08:44 pm »
Sorry, just too blurry.
Eating's a serious business. Don't bollocks around wagging your tail.

FifeingEejit

  • Not Small
Re: G. W. Bacon maps
« Reply #17 on: November 24, 2020, 01:23:38 pm »
There's a few available online at the National Library of Scotland. https://maps.nls.uk/mapmakers/name/Bacon
Seems some are 1 inch to 3 miles, or 1 inch to 6 miles. The oldest one specifies it is a scale of "English miles". Another one shows both "British Statute Miles" and "Geographical Miles".

I hadn't noticed these before, I naturally gravitated towards the 1895 Cycling map of Scotland (South sheet), and am amused by some of the errors and inconsistencies.


Tim Hall

  • Victoria is my queen
Re: G. W. Bacon maps
« Reply #18 on: November 24, 2020, 01:31:29 pm »
If you download it from your link, you can open it using Preview, and then zoom in to your heart's content.
London, Newcross, Blackheath, Shooters Hill (danger(?)), Dartford, Gravesend*, Rochester, Chatham (steep hill) , Sittingbourne, Faversham, Boughton Hill (steep), Canterbury, Sturry, Birchington, Margate

*Site of the finest Georgian street in England © Leggy
There are two ways you can get exercise out of a bicycle: you can
"overhaul" it, or you can ride it.  (Jerome K Jerome)

Re: G. W. Bacon maps
« Reply #19 on: November 24, 2020, 01:39:13 pm »
If you download it from your link, you can open it using Preview, and then zoom in to your heart's content.
London, Newcross, Blackheath, Shooters Hill (danger(?)), Dartford, Gravesend*, Rochester, Chatham (steep hill) , Sittingbourne, Faversham, Boughton Hill (steep), Canterbury, Sturry, Birchington, Margate

*Site of the finest Georgian street in England © Leggy
Ah!
I was looking for it marked on the map - rather than in the footnotes.
Ta.

Re: G. W. Bacon maps
« Reply #20 on: November 27, 2020, 12:22:31 pm »
That sounds fascinating, I'd love to see it.

Your wish...

https://photos.app.goo.gl/dW86KbmAf62ct22n9

I tried using the Google Photo embedding tool that Woolly posted a couple of months ago but was unable to make it work this time. Can't see what I'm doing wrong.

That is wonderful, thank you  :-*
Quote from: Kim
^ This woman knows what she's talking about.