Author Topic: TPU Inner tubes  (Read 16429 times)

Re: TPU Inner tubes
« Reply #50 on: 16 January, 2024, 09:08:20 pm »
My repair method ... and gently squeeze in a vice ...

Not entirely practical for a repair mid-ride, but I'd imagine that the pressure of the inner-tube against the tyre would behave similarly, once minimal adhesion holds things together adequately.

But what is the point in carrying repair kit, when the tubes are less than a third of the volume and less than a quarter of the weight of the old tubes, that we would happily take two spares on every ride? IE Take half a dozen spare tubes instead of two, and still save weight and volume.

The road tubes I ordered arrived and are also 18 -32mm 700c, but weigh just 26g each, and 4 take up the space that one of the old butyl ones takes. Incredible. Total game changer. My rear wheel is 98g lighter than it was yesterday, and all the weight saving is at the rotating extremity. Not a bad performance modification for £6!
"Ott's Law states that the worst weather will coincide with the worst part (for that weather) of any planned ride"

Cudzoziemiec

  • Ride adventurously and stop for a brew.
Re: TPU Inner tubes
« Reply #51 on: 17 January, 2024, 10:54:53 am »
If you don't repair them at the time, do you take them home and repair them? How much space does one take in your saddlebag once it's removed from the rim – I understand they don't shrink back to pre-inflated size like butyl?
Riding a concrete path through the nebulous and chaotic future.

Re: TPU Inner tubes
« Reply #52 on: 17 January, 2024, 11:14:07 am »
My repair method ... and gently squeeze in a vice ...

Not entirely practical for a repair mid-ride, but I'd imagine that the pressure of the inner-tube against the tyre would behave similarly, once minimal adhesion holds things together adequately.

But what is the point in carrying repair kit, when the tubes are less than a third of the volume and less than a quarter of the weight of the old tubes, that we would happily take two spares on every ride? IE Take half a dozen spare tubes instead of two, and still save weight and volume.

The road tubes I ordered arrived and are also 18 -32mm 700c, but weigh just 26g each, and 4 take up the space that one of the old butyl ones takes. Incredible. Total game changer. My rear wheel is 98g lighter than it was yesterday, and all the weight saving is at the rotating extremity. Not a bad performance modification for £6!

Yes, for all the fanfare about integrated cables, electric gears, disc brakes, aero frames and dimpled rims... these humble TPU inner tubes have by far made the biggest difference to my riding experience... they transform some pretty unremarkable low end tyres like the Zaffiro into top end racing slicks

Re: TPU Inner tubes
« Reply #53 on: 17 January, 2024, 11:33:35 am »
If you don't repair them at the time, do you take them home and repair them? How much space does one take in your saddlebag once it's removed from the rim – I understand they don't shrink back to pre-inflated size like butyl?

The Schwalbe Aerothans go back to almost the same size once you have let the air out. Been using them for a little while and impressed so far. I carry 3 (still less weight and size than 2 butyl tubes).
I do also carry a Park tools GP-2 patch kit which works fine on the aerothans. It is also tiny and weighs next to nothing but gives me a back up.

Owen
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Cudzoziemiec

  • Ride adventurously and stop for a brew.
Re: TPU Inner tubes
« Reply #54 on: 17 January, 2024, 12:19:57 pm »
People earlier were saying they permanently take on the shape of the tyre, but perhaps that depends on the quality of the tubes. I note the Schwalbes are almost £30 each whereas some no-brand ones on eBay are less than £3 each!

But I already have a GP2 patch kit so might be worth a try.
Riding a concrete path through the nebulous and chaotic future.

Cudzoziemiec

  • Ride adventurously and stop for a brew.
Re: TPU Inner tubes
« Reply #55 on: 17 January, 2024, 12:24:26 pm »
Looks like TPU tubes would be a good back-up to carry in case of non-sealing punctures in tubeless tyres (which in my case I have tried but couldn't make work – probably needed new tyres).
Riding a concrete path through the nebulous and chaotic future.

Re: TPU Inner tubes
« Reply #56 on: 17 January, 2024, 12:48:09 pm »
When TPU tubes first came out making use you had the right size (larger than the tyre) was important to stop them popping, is that still an issue?
 its hard to tell what the actual size of some are.

How do the generic orange TPU tubes size up?  I have 32mm tyres on wide rims so dont want to risk putting the tube under any stretching.

Re: TPU Inner tubes
« Reply #57 on: 17 January, 2024, 12:57:02 pm »
Looks like TPU tubes would be a good back-up to carry in case of non-sealing punctures in tubeless tyres (which in my case I have tried but couldn't make work – probably needed new tyres).

That's what I carry one for. Yet to be called upon (touches wood).

Re: TPU Inner tubes
« Reply #58 on: 17 January, 2024, 03:14:10 pm »
... I do also carry a Park tools GP-2 patch kit which works fine on the aerothans. ...

That's interesting, since Park themselves say "Not compatible with tubeless tire bodies or latex inner tubes", so I assumed that any non-traditional inner tubes would be unsuitable. However, in the comments section they do reply to a question with "Best Answer: Our test showed that a GP-2 will adhere to a Schwable Aerthon (sic) tube. There is no need to rough the surface with sandpaper, but it is important to make sure the surface of the tube is clean."

Since Aerothans appears to be made from BASF’s Ellastollan, which is their brand-name for thermoplastic polyurethane (TPU), then they will probably work with other types of TPU inner tube.

I used to use the GP-2 patches, when I was cycling more minimally, with just a pump, a set of tyres levers, and the patches velcroed under my seat. I found them less reliable than 'proper' vulcanised repairs, so typically removed them when I got home, and repaired the inner tube more traditionally.

Useful to know.  :thumbsup:
Actually, it is rocket science.
 

Re: TPU Inner tubes
« Reply #59 on: 17 January, 2024, 03:50:26 pm »
I have the Aerothan and the cheaper pink RideNow from Ali Express. They are as good as each other. They take the size of the tyre, so if you use a 28, they will get quite large and you won’t be able to use them for a 23 afterwards…

Re: TPU Inner tubes
« Reply #60 on: 19 January, 2024, 07:36:13 pm »
Just read a road cc review on aerothan inner tubes, thinking you could write much the same about a dozen RideNow tubes.

https://road.cc/content/review/schwalbe-aerothan-inner-tube-277797

Re: TPU Inner tubes
« Reply #61 on: 24 January, 2024, 07:52:01 pm »
Unlike the reviewer at road.cc I've successfully repaired punctured aerothan tubes with schwalbe glueless patches more than a handful of times (I was insisting on getting a few more km out of old gp4000s).
I find it easy and dependable enough. Clean the area around the puncture with alcohol, let dry, apply.
Since the patches are quite large, I cut them in halves.



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Cudzoziemiec

  • Ride adventurously and stop for a brew.
Re: TPU Inner tubes
« Reply #62 on: 27 January, 2024, 06:14:25 pm »
I've taken the plunge on these to the extent of £10.82 for two. They are purple, if the photo on ebay is to be believed. I'll see what colour (and quality) they are when they turn up. At least, I hope I will.
Riding a concrete path through the nebulous and chaotic future.

Cudzoziemiec

  • Ride adventurously and stop for a brew.
Re: TPU Inner tubes
« Reply #63 on: 06 February, 2024, 02:26:31 pm »
They've just turned up. They appear to be the right size. They are purple. And they do, as someone said, feel like they're made from "bag for life". Disturbingly, they have a lateral seam with a flap of overlapping material. I shall put one in and see what happens, keeping the other for spare.
Riding a concrete path through the nebulous and chaotic future.

Re: TPU Inner tubes
« Reply #64 on: 06 February, 2024, 03:39:56 pm »
My initial experience with tpu tubes was disappointing.  I had two (orange with black plastic valves) ultralight 28g tubes from amazon.  Both were use as on road replacements and both got me home (about 10km ride).  The first was deflated the next day and burst whist being reinflated.  The second was also deflated the next day and would reinflate but did not hold pressure for more than 20 minutes. 


The tubes were rated upto 18c - 32c and I was using them in a gp5000 32c tyres.  My suspicion is that was a 'stretch' too far for the weight of innertube.


I did notice an nice improvement in ride quality (very subjective observation) using the tpu tubes hence decided to try a different brand.


I subsequently obtained two  Cyclami Tubes 38g (green with with metal valves).  The tubes were wider and felt likek they were made from a heavier guage material.  The first one I used mid ride was still inflated the next day.  I can't report any further than that as I decided I was getting too many shark tooth flint punctures on the GP5000 so swapped to a pair of 40c Marathon Almotions I had. 


For the Almotions, I now have two tubes rated 35-45c on order that I will try and report back.


I'm also wondering if the chill from CO2 cylinders may have adversely affected the stretchability of the original innertubes around the value area.
Clever enough to know I'm not clever enough.

Re: TPU Inner tubes
« Reply #65 on: 06 February, 2024, 07:47:23 pm »
.....
I'm also wondering if the chill from CO2 cylinders may have adversely affected the stretchability of the original innertubes around the value area.

Yes, that is an interesting observation, as TPU is thermoplastic (polyurethane), I could well believe that the Joules Thompson effect of refridgeration of the expanding gas would cause temporary embrittlement of the tube, near the valve, just when it is moving to fill the gaps.

Interested to hear if others have had the same observations.
"Ott's Law states that the worst weather will coincide with the worst part (for that weather) of any planned ride"

sam

Re: TPU Inner tubes
« Reply #66 on: 07 February, 2024, 07:12:41 pm »
I’m just wondering whether the hype is real

All I know is Facebook thinks I really really need them, and will probably insist even if I try to hide the ads.

Re: TPU Inner tubes
« Reply #67 on: 07 February, 2024, 09:08:03 pm »
VERY Noticeable improvement on the handling of my 29er, today, when I fitted one in the front wheel, mid-ride, quicker to change direction, quicker to accelerate, softer on the hands over bumps.
"Ott's Law states that the worst weather will coincide with the worst part (for that weather) of any planned ride"

Re: TPU Inner tubes
« Reply #68 on: 07 February, 2024, 09:25:12 pm »
Sounds interesting - ordered a couple from AliExpress.  My road bikes have a variety of 25 and 28 tyres so I got the ultra-light 24g ones which fit 18-28 supposedly.
The sound of one pannier flapping

Re: TPU Inner tubes
« Reply #69 on: 08 February, 2024, 04:19:50 pm »
Yes, for all the fanfare about integrated cables, electric gears, disc brakes, aero frames and dimpled rims... these humble TPU inner tubes have by far made the biggest difference to my riding experience... they transform some pretty unremarkable low end tyres like the Zaffiro into top end racing slicks

Just think, you could've been getting the exact same benefits (maybe better actually) from latex tubes since forever, with the exception of packed size. Also, imagine you had top end racing tyres AND nice light tubes...

Nice tyres can be expensive nowadays, but give more benefit per quid spent than anything else. Latex/TPU tubes or tubeless sealant 2nd.

Cudzoziemiec

  • Ride adventurously and stop for a brew.
Re: TPU Inner tubes
« Reply #70 on: 18 February, 2024, 07:33:04 pm »
I finally got around to fitting my TPU tubes yesterday. Or at least, I tried to. I encountered a problem that's brand new to me: the valve stem, which is smooth plastic, was marginally too large a diameter to fit in the valve hole in the rim. It's definitely not just an overhang of tape, as I tried it from the inside out, so to speak, to make sure. And I'm sure it's the valves being out of spec not the rims, as I've never had this problem before, with any brand of tube. I suppose I should have tried the other tube just to make sure (I only intended to fit one, just to see how they held air etc) but I didn't. I guess I'll have to try and return them via Ebay. Gustavo brand, purple colour in a yellow box, for you to avoid.
Riding a concrete path through the nebulous and chaotic future.

Re: TPU Inner tubes
« Reply #71 on: 18 February, 2024, 07:36:21 pm »
That's not good.  I'll remember to test out the valves in rims before packing these as spares.
The sound of one pannier flapping

Cudzoziemiec

  • Ride adventurously and stop for a brew.
Re: TPU Inner tubes
« Reply #72 on: 18 February, 2024, 08:11:00 pm »
I guess it's a hazard of buying unknown cheap brands off Ebay rather eg Schwalbe. Or even something like Lifeline off Wiggle.
Riding a concrete path through the nebulous and chaotic future.

Re: TPU Inner tubes
« Reply #73 on: 22 February, 2024, 11:38:05 am »
I have some ridenow TPU tubes for use as spares for a tubeless setup, so as with many of you haven't used them yet.

I concur with the worries over the valve and stem quality, and I've especially seen complaints over issues with the stem joining the tube on the weightweenies forum, across many AliExpress brands of TPU tubes.

Do any of your TPU tubes have a removable valve core? Mine don't.
In my experience with normal butyl tubes of various price points, it's very much does not indicate good quality when the valve core can't be swapped out.

I wish there was some reliable European brand with middle of the road prices for TPU rather than 10x prices - these must be the most profitable thing that Schwalbe or Tubolito make.

I've just seen the Pirelli Cinturato ones down to 13.99 so more doable, but still a bit too much given I might not use them ever, and I'm more likely to give them away to someone having a puncture nightmare on an audax.

Re: TPU Inner tubes
« Reply #74 on: 22 February, 2024, 12:35:18 pm »
Why would TPU tubes need a removable core? Additionally the Continental Ride 28 and other butyl tubes I have don't have removable cores and I wouldn't call them low quality.  I think the main complaint about plastic valves is that they are too prone to damage when inflating the tube.  I've been selecting TPU tubes with metal valves because of this although I also have a few with plastic.
Clever enough to know I'm not clever enough.