Author Topic: Inexpensive folding bike  (Read 3883 times)

Inexpensive folding bike
« on: 27 March, 2023, 04:03:14 pm »
Because of reasons, I am looking for a folding bike that isn't too expensive. Any suggestions? Does anyone have any experience of Decathlon folders? They look too cheap to be true, though I have read decent things about Decathlon bikes in general. Other brands to look at?

Diesel

  • or Richard
Re: Inexpensive folding bike
« Reply #1 on: 27 March, 2023, 04:20:49 pm »
Yes, I've had the BTWIN Folding Bike Tilt 500 for a year or so. Basically, it's ok and I think good value.

I bought it online and had it delivered. In fact I had 2 delivered and 2 returned as both had a faulty hinge. Decathlon weren't the friendliest to deal with but they returned them free of charge with no hassle so I'll settle for that.

The third one I used click and collect. Again the hinge was poor, far too stiff to operate easily. They sorted it in store in half an hour and it's been fine since.

To ride it's fine for what it is. I've not had another folder so can't compare. I mostly use to ride to the station and around town. I've done a few 10 milers and 1 x 40 mile ride. Only had 1 puncture. Only faults have been bits coming loose and needing tightening - mudguard bolts, the hinge again and headset.

It takes up more space than some folders on the train but it's ok and I take it on at peak times.

Gear range is pretty good for most stuff. I'm happy with it for the £350 I paid.

Let me know if any specific questions




Re: Inexpensive folding bike
« Reply #2 on: 27 March, 2023, 06:05:59 pm »
I'd look out for a second-hand Dahon or lookalike from a reliable source. Dahon make bikes for various other brands so, if it looks like a Dahon, it usually is.

Re: Inexpensive folding bike
« Reply #3 on: 27 March, 2023, 07:32:35 pm »
Dahon make bikes for various other brands so, if it looks like a Dahon, it usually is.
Including most if not all of the Halfords Carrera range which come in a variety of specs.  If nothing else, for many people it'll be the easiest place to have a look and the pricing is usually competitive.

Slipping seat post (was Inexpensive folding bike)
« Reply #4 on: 01 February, 2024, 12:41:51 pm »
Resurrecting this thread because I got a Carrera from Halfords which is fine* apart from the fact that the seat keeps sliding down - sometimes I have had to stop 3 times in a 15 minute journey to put it back up. The little knob on the seat post clamp is done up so tight that I can only just get the quick release to close, but that doesn't stop it slipping.

Any suggestions? Would a new seat post clamp help? (Note that I have to be able to fold it up, so anything that involves fixing the seat post permanently in place is out.)

*except the fold is terrible if you are used to a Brompton, but what did I expect?

Kim

  • Timelord
    • Fediverse
Re: Inexpensive folding bike
« Reply #5 on: 01 February, 2024, 12:52:36 pm »
Usual fix for slipping seatposts on Bromptons is IPA:

1) First, try cleaning all the surfaces involved with alcohol to remove any grease or oil that may have accumulated.
b) When that doesn't work, spill BEER on it, and hope the resulting stickiness achieves the friction you need.


The folding BSO I had before I discovered proper bicycles was chronically afflicted:  I replaced the cheesy seatpost clamp with a decent one, which was a mistake, as the improved leverage just ovalised the seatpost and stopped it folding properly.

Re: Inexpensive folding bike
« Reply #6 on: 01 February, 2024, 01:11:37 pm »
Maybe try a coke can shim?
<i>Marmite slave</i>

Kim

  • Timelord
    • Fediverse
Re: Inexpensive folding bike
« Reply #7 on: 01 February, 2024, 01:36:36 pm »
Thinking about it, if the saddle clamp is rotatable with regard to the seatpost, it may be worth turning it 90 degrees in case the post has become ovalised.

Re: Inexpensive folding bike
« Reply #8 on: 02 February, 2024, 11:24:16 am »
Maybe try a coke can shim?
Having googled, I might try giving that a go (though it will be easier to use a beer can, I hope that will work  ;) ). The issue will be whether it will stay put during the folding and unfolding process. Worth a try anyway.

Thinking about it, if the saddle clamp is rotatable with regard to the seatpost, it may be worth turning it 90 degrees in case the post has become ovalised.
Hmm. I wonder if ovalising is the problem? It wouldn't surprise me that I've used too much BF&I on the thing.

Of course, having asked the question, it stayed put this morning!

Re: Inexpensive folding bike
« Reply #9 on: 06 February, 2024, 10:10:03 am »
Well <crosses fingers> I seem to have resolved this by

1) asking on here
b) making sure that the seatpost clamp is lined up properly with the seatpost
iii) putting a bit of oil on the bit of the clamp that hinges in so that it isn't so stiff

Re: Inexpensive folding bike
« Reply #10 on: 06 February, 2024, 10:24:03 pm »
I had this problem with my Montana which has a similar frame to a Carrera. The problem is that the post is only actually clamped right at the top and the rest of the seat post is in a tube with a lot of clearance. So not a great design for clamping in the first place usually compounded by bouncing a bit on the saddle when you try to spin the pedals around a bit quicker than the manufacturer intended.
The solution, suggested by one of the audaxers OTP, is to use a jubilee clip on the seat post as a collar to stop the saddle descending as you bounce on it. It works very well for me (in spite of a certain scepticism on my part). It is a good idea just to check the height from time to time (every 6-12months!).The only inconvenience is that you have to take the seat post out when you fold rather than sliding it into the frame (this hasn't posed a problem to me but I don't commute by public transport - or even at all now). This has the advantage that your seat is always put at the right height when you unfold - without needing to think about it!