Author Topic: Your strangest (or best) cycling experience ... to date.  (Read 7646 times)

Re: Your strangest (or best) cycling experience ... to date.
« Reply #50 on: 26 October, 2023, 02:28:31 am »
I was once attacked by a vicious man-eating rabbit.

It was on a 600, around dawn, when a group of rabbits ran across the road. One of them attempted the between-the-wheels manoevre, but decided to do this via my foot (which was at the bottom of the pedal stroke). As it was lifted, it started scrabbling frantically. exiting through the main triangle and via my other foot. Explaining the mass of scratches across my shins at the end of the event was entertaining, to say the least.

     I could see it, absolutely brilliant, haven't stopped laughing and wife is getting worried
The problem with the world is that fools and fanatics are always so sure of themselves, and wiser men so full of doubt.

Re: Your strangest (or best) cycling experience ... to date.
« Reply #51 on: 26 October, 2023, 05:23:16 pm »
Strangest was probably decades ago, as a teenager, riding near home with a friend. I suddenly realised that I had no idea whatsoever where I was, or where we were going. After a second or two, it passed, and I knew where I was once more - the road was a familiar one.

Nothing like that has happened to me before or since.

sam

Re: Your strangest (or best) cycling experience ... to date.
« Reply #52 on: 26 October, 2023, 05:49:02 pm »
I suddenly realised that I had no idea whatsoever where I was, or where we were going.



This happens to me every once in a while on my regular loop, which I've done thousands of times and hope to do thousands more. I can get so lost in thought that I look up and think Where am I? (Funny, I thought that song had a line that said exactly that, but it doesn't.) It can then take a few turns of the cranks to (re)place myself.

Re: Your strangest (or best) cycling experience ... to date.
« Reply #53 on: 14 May, 2024, 06:34:01 pm »
France has regions with vast networks of good rural roads, remarkably few of which are cul de sacs.  I used to love cycling round them with no idea where they would lead and being completely lost. So long as I could see where the sun was I always found my way home. In some parts hours seemed to pass without seeing another vehicle.  Looking at a map was always tricky since I rarely knew where I was and settlements were often unmarked.  One time I did have to ask my way the motorist turned out to be a keen cyclist who recommended a very pleasant route I hadn’t known about. 

Sheldon Brown never said leave it to the professionals.