Author Topic: Integrated induction hob.  (Read 3492 times)

Re: Integrated induction hob.
« Reply #25 on: 04 January, 2024, 03:52:40 pm »
I'd argue it is, actually - it's part of the whole clean surface thing.

The "clean surface thing" is not an inherent or necessary feature of cooking with induction.

mmmm, that's why you will be able to show me one - just one - currently made without touch controls?

(there may well be, but not in https://www.currys.co.uk/appliances/cooking/hobs-built-in/induction-hobs AFAICS)

Re: Integrated induction hob.
« Reply #26 on: 04 January, 2024, 03:55:28 pm »
I did find one (soemwhat surprsingly cheap too)- but kims rule of knobs getting gunked up will apply I guess.

https://cookology.com/product/collections/black-products/cookology-59cm-induction-hob-with-rotary-controls-black/
We are making a New World (Paul Nash, 1918)

Re: Integrated induction hob.
« Reply #27 on: 04 January, 2024, 04:11:48 pm »
I think you'll find that reinforces the point I was making, that for all intents and purposes, choosing induction means choosing touch controls.

citoyen

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Re: Integrated induction hob.
« Reply #28 on: 04 January, 2024, 04:48:11 pm »
I think you'll find that reinforces the point I was making, that for all intents and purposes, choosing induction means choosing touch controls.

Maybe but the point I was making is that this is down to bad design decisions, not inherent flaws in the cooking method. And bad design of controls is not unique to induction hobs, as you yourself have said (see also: kitchen scales).

Of course, if touch controls are a deal-breaker for you, it will limit your options. That's just the way of the world though - things aren't designed with practicality or ergonomics in mind these days, they're designed to look nice and sleek and compact (see also: integrated extractors). This is the dream the marketers have convinced us is what we want, so that is what they will offer us.

Most people don't actually do any cooking on their appliances anyway so they care more about being able to easily wipe the surface clean.
"The future's all yours, you lousy bicycles."

Re: Integrated induction hob.
« Reply #29 on: 04 January, 2024, 04:59:59 pm »
I think you'll find that reinforces the point I was making, that for all intents and purposes, choosing induction means choosing touch controls.

To be clear, I found quite a number of similar hobs with rotary controls, including a not-so-cheap Smeg, but certainly a more limited selection than pure touch control. As I noted though, I prefer a stand alone double oven stove, and there there is more choice available. And I’ve never used a touch only integrated job, hence my original question re usability.
We are making a New World (Paul Nash, 1918)

citoyen

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Re: Integrated induction hob.
« Reply #30 on: 04 January, 2024, 05:21:16 pm »
I’ve never used a touch only integrated job, hence my original question re usability.

As lissotriton says, they vary a lot. Some are good, some are awful.

Some people will have particular reasons for not being able to use them or not wanting to use them. I don't know if that applies to you.
"The future's all yours, you lousy bicycles."

Re: Integrated induction hob.
« Reply #31 on: 04 January, 2024, 05:42:44 pm »
I think you'll find that reinforces the point I was making, that for all intents and purposes, choosing induction means choosing touch controls.

Maybe but the point I was making is that this is down to bad design decisions, not inherent flaws in the cooking method. And bad design of controls is not unique to induction hobs, as you yourself have said (see also: kitchen scales).

Of course, if touch controls are a deal-breaker for you, it will limit your options. That's just the way of the world though - things aren't designed with practicality or ergonomics in mind these days, they're designed to look nice and sleek and compact (see also: integrated extractors). This is the dream the marketers have convinced us is what we want, so that is what they will offer us.

Most people don't actually do any cooking on their appliances anyway so they care more about being able to easily wipe the surface clean.

Well, yes, no argument here.

I suspect my mode of kitchen use, with occasional forays into catering for 50+ and relatively frequent meals for 12 or more makes me an edge case, but I'm not as precious as I might sound. I'm looking around at replacement hobs, as it looks possible that my 5 burner/90cm wide Neff might well kark it soon, in a way that will make it difficult to repair. This year, I cooked a christmas dinner for 15 on an induction hob in our ski apartment. Yes, I noticed the lack of precision control (pans going from boiling too quickly to off the boil, etc) and yes I loathed the touch control, but I could work with both features, which oddly made me happier about settling on a "Flameselect" if I have to.

My drop dead criteria are: same or larger dimensions (not easy at 90cm) and 2 minimum high output burners/plates. After that, flameselect would level the choice of gas against induction in my book, all my pans would work with induction so no issues there.

ETA - I hated the touch control because of its sensitivity/lack of sensitivity when wet/wet fingers, and the way this particular one made you select the plate you wanted to work with before using (an admitedly long and easy to stab at) a single up down control

Kim

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Re: Integrated induction hob.
« Reply #32 on: 04 January, 2024, 06:11:20 pm »
We had a huge (took 4 standard supermarket pizzas on one shelf) oven and hob on the barge. All cooking was done on hob or that oven.

The oven was more than decent.

My prejudices against LPG mostly come via my Lincolnshire correspondent, who has suffered a series of cookers with dodgy oven thermostats and bemoans the lack of alternatives.  (His competent but difficult-to-motivate dad refuses to run some 6mm^2 for an electric cooker, ostensibly out of fear of Part P.)

I also note that our current cooker was given to us for free when Mr Barakta's-Dad moved to the arse end of Essex and discovered you couldn't get LPG wossnames for it, which is presumably normal.

Mrs Pingu

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Re: Integrated induction hob.
« Reply #33 on: 04 January, 2024, 07:33:32 pm »
Agree with the grumbles about touch controls, some people seem to be invisible to them!
Do not clench. It only makes it worse.

Re: Integrated induction hob.
« Reply #34 on: 05 January, 2024, 10:06:09 am »
But REALLY. Touch switches? As many seem to have. Whoever thought that was a good idea? Actually, whoever thought that was an ACEPTABLE idea? Apparently many manufacturers.

Not a format-specific complaint though, is it?

I'd argue it is, actually - it's part of the whole clean surface thing. To be clear, bad controls are not a uniquely induction thing, the Neff & Co "flameselect" thing : "LOOK WE'VE MADE A GAS HOB THAT JUMPS JUST LIKE AN ELECTRIC" is a case in point. And yes, while I can cook with the jumps natural to electric, I much prefer the infinitely adjustable gas.
The eldest child has an induction hob with a completely smooth surface - the controls are magnetic disks, stay in place due to magnetic majik. Lift off for cleaning.

Best of both worlds, until your children play with and lose the controls.
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barakta

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Re: Integrated induction hob.
« Reply #35 on: 05 January, 2024, 12:50:28 pm »
A visually impaired friend of mine got an induction hob, but had to pay more than £400 extra (for a much higher end model than they needed/wanted) just to get one with physical knobs she could make accessible for her needs as she can't see touch-controls well enough to use them. We call this criptax but it adds up if you consider washing machine, dishwasher and any other fairly standard kitchen equipment that is essential. Friend also has talking scales which again cost a bit more although those are cheaper these days as it's becoming more mainstream, children like them and it's cheap to just add talkie stuff.