Author Topic: The path to regaining fitness  (Read 2102 times)

The path to regaining fitness
« on: 20 March, 2024, 05:57:34 pm »
Having been advised by surgeons not to resume running or cycling for a month (5 days in), im resigned to the fact that my cycling specific fitness will deteriorate somewhat. However, im optimistic that ill regain a modicum of fitness as im currently free of lower abdominal pain that i endured for a decade. Lighter evenings and warmer weather will assist my comeback.
As im a bit old school i intend to just ride as i feel RPE. i imagine it will be, in modern parlance zone 2.
The drivetrains on my bikes are squeaky clean, tyres free from any embedded foreign objects.
I will volunteer at a local audax and put something back.

redshift

  • High Priestess of wires
    • redshift home
Re: The path to regaining fitness
« Reply #1 on: 20 March, 2024, 08:59:01 pm »
I had to have time off all my activities when I had my breast cancer treatment. No cycling, no kayaking, no swimming etc. from having surgery until I recovered from my radiotherapy. It was about 4 months in total. When I asked what I was allowed to do, it was suggested I could do a brisk walk up to 5km per day, so that's what I did. It was something of a struggle to get back to normal after that, but it comes back eventually. It would have been much worse if I hadn't kept moving!
L
:)
Windcheetah No. 176
The all-round entertainer gets quite arsey,
They won't translate his lame shit into Farsi
Somehow to let it go would be more classy…

Re: The path to regaining fitness
« Reply #2 on: 24 April, 2024, 06:19:45 am »
Its just not happening. Nearly five weeks sìnce i had a Turp operation and although that area seems to have healed very well i find myself unbelievably tired. For context , im 63 and am a builder, currently working full time. I returnred to work 10 days after op. and took it easy for a week. Im finding that although im able to direct others, problem solve as well as carry out often very physical tasks . This is what ive done for 35 years. Its as though quite suddenly ive aged. Ive no spare energy for cycling or running. Its work or cycle/run i cant do both anymore. It may not be the op. perhaps its natural that im bound to slow down but it seems quite sudden. My wife would like me to stop work after this current project and focus on personal wellness.
Ive worked in construction, run and cycled all my life and now ive to choose it seems.

Re: The path to regaining fitness
« Reply #3 on: 24 April, 2024, 07:51:26 am »
I’m not a doctor, but I would guess that diving straight into being a builder (outdoors a lot, on your feet and moving about, even if you get someone else to do the heavy stuff) is more than your body really wanted. You’ll be catching up with that. A few days off might help, and build back up steadily.
Though it doesn’t hurt to consider retiring at some point.
Good luck.

Re: The path to regaining fitness
« Reply #4 on: 24 April, 2024, 09:52:35 am »
I do think you haven't give yourself enough time to recover from your op.
Your idea of "taking it easy" is probably not the same as your consultant

I've had two major abdominal ops, and in each case was not allowed to run or twist or lift anything for 6 weeks.
Got me out of the housework!
Being self-employed in horticulture, that was tricky but I just had to delegate.
I was told I could walk as much as I wanted, so I gave out instuctions for the day and walked off.
After the six weeks, I was up and running again fairly quickly.

Give yourself more time.
Then you can decide if you want/can afford to retire from full-time work.




hellymedic

  • Just do it!
Re: The path to regaining fitness
« Reply #5 on: 24 April, 2024, 12:08:19 pm »
You need two to four months.
It WILL happen.
It’s not happened yet.
Give It TIME!
Eat well.
Rest well.

DO NOT ATTEMPT TO LOSE WEIGHT!
Eat a sensible diet and don’t eat TOO much fattening food if you’re worried.

Chill out till the solstice -watch and enjoy the Spring.

Give It TIME!

Just because there’s not much to see externally from your surgery, you shouldn’t forget this has been a MAJOR insult to your insides.

Take it easy.
Don’t stress out!
If you can afford a beach bum holiday now, go for it - just sun, sitting, eating and a little culture/entertainment.

Too much activity at this stage can be counterproductive.

Give it TIME!

Hope you’re feeling more energetic soon!

Re: The path to regaining fitness
« Reply #6 on: 24 April, 2024, 09:48:24 pm »
As helly said. You went back too early as you are male, overachiever and had minimally invasive surgery.
However you still had massive body injury.

If I ever need that surgery I will be carb loading as for a 600k ride then taking at least 8 weeks off work with a protein rich diet with adequate carbs, walking some and then progressing through a couch to 5k program, etc.

Be sensible.

barakta

  • Bastard lovechild of Yomiko Readman and Johnny 5
Re: The path to regaining fitness
« Reply #7 on: 25 April, 2024, 12:07:28 am »
I think one issue is that in modern society we are bad at remembering some surgery NEEDS significant recovery. We're used to many surgeries only needing 1-2 weeks proper rest and maybe a few more less-rest.

There's a dreadful work-ethic thing about recovering faster = better. People BRAG about their speedy recovery (which inadvertently pressurises those of us who need longer or have more slow-recovery surgery).

I know after my different surgery in Mid-Feb it's taken me ages to recover, not helped by hips/groins not being tourniquet-able so I lost a lot of blood and the anaemia (which wasn't bad enough to transfuse for) did me in horribly. I was off work 6 weeks. I'm still not 100%.

I wish more people had Chris's knowledge though, of things like pre-surgery diet and that level of "what you can do in recovery" cos there's very little of that from the NHS in my experience. Less said about hospital food the better...

Re: The path to regaining fitness
« Reply #8 on: 25 April, 2024, 05:53:40 am »
Good advice from all, thanks. Youre all stating the same thing in that i need to be patient.(pun?) I suppose ive always been the polar opposite of that. Its the first operation/ medical procedure ive had and as i cant see an obvious injury i naievely thought i recovered. Going to do my best to ease up for awhile.

Re: The path to regaining fitness
« Reply #9 on: 25 April, 2024, 07:06:50 am »
Increasingly prehabilitation is being practiced. Knee replacement patients get planned training prior to surgery with advice on eating, etc. postoperative instruction tends to focus on physio and not quality and quantity of food in this country.

T42

  • Apprentice geezer
Re: The path to regaining fitness
« Reply #10 on: 25 April, 2024, 08:21:21 am »
As helly said. You went back too early as you are male, overachiever and had minimally invasive surgery.
However you still had massive body injury.

After the Inlaw Paw's TURP the surgeon told him to imagine he'd been shot.
I've dusted off all those old bottles and set them up straight

hellymedic

  • Just do it!
Re: The path to regaining fitness
« Reply #11 on: 25 April, 2024, 12:04:45 pm »
At some point in the future, it’s possible you’ll shift health gear from first, which is where you are now, chugging along with little zest, to second, third and fourth, in pretty rapid succession, feel ‘properly well’ and ‘bouncing like Tigger’.
I can’t tell when this will be, but sticking to fairly pedestrian activities and expectations until then will do no harm.