Author Topic: Marmalade  (Read 76613 times)

Re: Marmalade
« Reply #300 on: 09 January, 2024, 11:00:49 am »
My mum used the tinned Sevilles back in the ‘60’s when fresh were hard to find.

The one that I remember was called 'Ma made'  -  which seems kind of appropriate.
Yes, my parents used to use (possibly still do use) Mamade if Seville oranges are not available and more marmalade is required.
Those Morrison's reviews are hilarious...

Morat

  • I tried to HTFU but something went ping :(
Re: Marmalade
« Reply #301 on: 18 January, 2024, 12:29:18 pm »
36lbs now safely stashed in my preserve store. There were about 6 pounds remaining so supplies were low! This time I subsituted blood oranges for the two normal oranges that I normally use per batch. I'm sure I can taste a slightly grapefruity tang, but time will tell. I usually leave jarred marmalade for at least a couple of months before I open it.


The low carb thing is going great.
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citoyen

  • Occasionally rides a bike
Re: Marmalade
« Reply #302 on: 18 January, 2024, 12:38:45 pm »
Success! 6.5 jars of marmalade* from just over a kilo of oranges. I have another kilo with which to make a second batch, which I shall do tomorrow.

I think I over-boiled the first batch. Good flavour but a bit of a caramel taste, rather thick consistency and the peel had become quite chewy. Second batch was much better - I took it off the boil as soon as it hit 105C. It passed the cold plate test but once I'd got it in jars it seemed to take forever to set. But it did eventually set perfectly. Very happy with the results. Valuable lessons learned for next time.

I usually leave jarred marmalade for at least a couple of months before I open it.

I don't know how you have the patience!
"The future's all yours, you lousy bicycles."

Re: Marmalade
« Reply #303 on: 18 January, 2024, 12:48:33 pm »
The trick is never to deplete stock, patience not required

citoyen

  • Occasionally rides a bike
Re: Marmalade
« Reply #304 on: 18 January, 2024, 03:40:44 pm »
The trick is never to deplete stock, patience not required

I would have to make an awful lot of marmalade to achieve that (36lbs sounds like it might do the trick, tbh).
"The future's all yours, you lousy bicycles."

Morat

  • I tried to HTFU but something went ping :(
Re: Marmalade
« Reply #305 on: 21 March, 2024, 04:15:29 pm »
I found this handy guide to marmalade setting temps:

Quote

Here's the impact of cooking temperature on marmalade set:

marmalade cooked to the lower end of the range (217–218°F or 103ºC) has a bright citrus flavour like fresh citrus fruit, but it is more on the watery side of set. The peel is very tender. Marmalade cooked to this temperature dribbles off your toast and leaves a trail in your kitchen or on your keyboard, if you are like me, doing chores while eating marmalade on toast in the morning, without a plate to catch the drips. Delicious, but drippy.
   
marmalade cooked to the middle of the range (219°F or 104ºC) is not as drippy, but not overly set. The flavour is still bright and the peel is tender, but the preserve is just a touch thicker.
   
marmalade cooked to the upper end of the range (220–221°F or 105ºC) is set just right for me: 220°F is considered the setting point of jam, also known as the gelling point, and this is where things get really interesting. The marmalade is much thicker, but with a touch of dribble to it, the peel is firmer, and the flavour is completely different. The citrus flavour is still there, but it's not as bright. The caramel undertone is coming through and there's a bit of a bitter orange flavour that lingers.

marmalade cooked to the setting point, 222°F (105.5ºC), is chewy and very thick: this is the upper limit, in my opinion, as beyond this point, the peel gets really, really chewy. At 222°F, the peel is a "nice" chewy. Past 222°F (106ºC), the peel is bordering on tough, and not so pleasant.


Here's the source, which includes pictures but also an UNHOLY amount of ads: https://bakeschool.com/making-marmalade-cooking-temperatures-the-jam-setting-point/
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