Author Topic: Random...  (Read 10065 times)

Cudzoziemiec

  • Моя планета голубая, я люблю тебя и обнимаю
Re: Random...
« Reply #25 on: 29 September, 2017, 12:33:27 pm »
My son started school here just before Easter of Year 2. He'd previously done a bit of school in Poland, where 6 is the normal starting age. He was definitely behind all the other kids in reading and writing – not for language reasons but because he just had no idea how to write any words, as opposed to strings of letters – and I think also maths when he started, but soon caught up. As Greenbank says, it's really just structured play.
Riding a bike through a city is like navigating the collective neural pathways of a vast global mind.

Wowbagger

  • Sylph
    • Musings of a Gentleman Cyclist
Re: Random...
« Reply #26 on: 08 October, 2017, 12:04:57 am »
My grandson seems to have taken to school like a duck to water and his smiley, immature cuteness has made him a great favourite amongst the adults he deals with. His language is considerably less developed than is normal for a 4 year old, but he definitely isn't short of brain power. His mum and sister both have acute astigmatism and he had an eye test a few weeks ago, identifying pictures. The optician was bowled over when he answered "orca" and "tiger shark" instead of "whale" and "shark",which were the answers she was expecting. He is also very quick with puzzles of any sort

 When he speaks, certain unimportant words just don't form part of his used vocabulary - to, the, and etc. However, he recognises all his letters and is good at phonics. He is demonstrating what I think is a very unusual phenomenon - his learning to read is actually teaching him how to speak in correctly-constructed sentences. I think all the textbooks on the theory of language development say that this is supposed to be the other way round.
Bach without a doubt.

Kim

  • Timelord
Re: Random...
« Reply #27 on: 08 October, 2017, 02:45:36 pm »
He is demonstrating what I think is a very unusual phenomenon - his learning to read is actually teaching him how to speak in correctly-constructed sentences. I think all the textbooks on the theory of language development say that this is supposed to be the other way round.

Ah yes, the barakta principle.
Careful, Kim. Your sarcasm's showing...

hellymedic

  • Just do it!
Re: Random...
« Reply #28 on: 08 October, 2017, 03:00:34 pm »
Another BMJ obit snippet:

Quote
... came home after a shift and found a letter written earlier in the day by 4 year old ****. “Dear mummy, I hoape you don’t git to tired at hospidol looking at the pashnts—If you do in the midol of a pashnt finish the pashnt then come home. Love from ****.” “With amazing maturity,” Turner-Warwick says, “she had understood the priorities.

Re: Random...
« Reply #29 on: 10 October, 2017, 04:55:09 pm »
Not exactly from a kid, but from my son before he set off on his travelling:

"I'm not looking forward to the 24hour flight from Canada to Australia. I don't know why it's so long, they aren't all that far from each other."
<i>Marmite slave</i>

Cudzoziemiec

  • Моя планета голубая, я люблю тебя и обнимаю
Re: Random...
« Reply #30 on: 10 October, 2017, 05:14:24 pm »
My grandson seems to have taken to school like a duck to water and his smiley, immature cuteness has made him a great favourite amongst the adults he deals with. His language is considerably less developed than is normal for a 4 year old, but he definitely isn't short of brain power. His mum and sister both have acute astigmatism and he had an eye test a few weeks ago, identifying pictures. The optician was bowled over when he answered "orca" and "tiger shark" instead of "whale" and "shark",which were the answers she was expecting. He is also very quick with puzzles of any sort

 When he speaks, certain unimportant words just don't form part of his used vocabulary - to, the, and etc. However, he recognises all his letters and is good at phonics. He is demonstrating what I think is a very unusual phenomenon - his learning to read is actually teaching him how to speak in correctly-constructed sentences. I think all the textbooks on the theory of language development say that this is supposed to be the other way round.
Identifying different species of shark seems pretty normal for a 4 year old but reading better than speaking is curious.

Edit: Learning sentence construction from reading is of course normal for older kids and adults.
Riding a bike through a city is like navigating the collective neural pathways of a vast global mind.

Re: Random...
« Reply #31 on: 10 October, 2017, 07:23:26 pm »
It seems to be a little known fact that school attendance in England and Wales is NOT compulsory.  If you start, then you would need to formally opt out - but it is a formality.  You don't have to start.

hellymedic

  • Just do it!
Re: Random...
« Reply #32 on: 10 October, 2017, 10:32:37 pm »
My grandson seems to have taken to school like a duck to water and his smiley, immature cuteness has made him a great favourite amongst the adults he deals with. His language is considerably less developed than is normal for a 4 year old, but he definitely isn't short of brain power. His mum and sister both have acute astigmatism and he had an eye test a few weeks ago, identifying pictures. The optician was bowled over when he answered "orca" and "tiger shark" instead of "whale" and "shark",which were the answers she was expecting. He is also very quick with puzzles of any sort

 When he speaks, certain unimportant words just don't form part of his used vocabulary - to, the, and etc. However, he recognises all his letters and is good at phonics. He is demonstrating what I think is a very unusual phenomenon - his learning to read is actually teaching him how to speak in correctly-constructed sentences. I think all the textbooks on the theory of language development say that this is supposed to be the other way round.

Identifying different species of shark seems pretty normal for a 4 year old but reading better than speaking is curious.

I take it his hearing has been fully checked...

Cudzoziemiec

  • Моя планета голубая, я люблю тебя и обнимаю
Re: Random...
« Reply #33 on: 11 October, 2017, 11:15:23 am »
My grandson seems to have taken to school like a duck to water and his smiley, immature cuteness has made him a great favourite amongst the adults he deals with. His language is considerably less developed than is normal for a 4 year old, but he definitely isn't short of brain power. His mum and sister both have acute astigmatism and he had an eye test a few weeks ago, identifying pictures. The optician was bowled over when he answered "orca" and "tiger shark" instead of "whale" and "shark",which were the answers she was expecting. He is also very quick with puzzles of any sort

 When he speaks, certain unimportant words just don't form part of his used vocabulary - to, the, and etc. However, he recognises all his letters and is good at phonics. He is demonstrating what I think is a very unusual phenomenon - his learning to read is actually teaching him how to speak in correctly-constructed sentences. I think all the textbooks on the theory of language development say that this is supposed to be the other way round.

I take it his hearing has been fully checked...
Identifying different species of shark seems pretty normal for a 4 year old but reading better than speaking is curious.
Yeah, I was thinking possibly some speech impediment but hearing is probably more likely, if there is a physical problem.
Riding a bike through a city is like navigating the collective neural pathways of a vast global mind.

clarion

  • Tyke
Re: Random...
« Reply #34 on: 12 October, 2017, 09:34:07 am »
I note the rapid advance of marine biology among smalls following the advent of the Octonauts.  We have been asked about some unusual denizens of the deep.
Getting there...

Wowbagger

  • Sylph
    • Musings of a Gentleman Cyclist
Re: Random...
« Reply #35 on: 01 February, 2018, 08:36:29 pm »
Quote
According to Katie Hinde, PhD, a biologist and associate professor at the Center for Evolution and Medicine at the School of Human Evolution & Social Change at Arizona State University, when a baby suckles, it creates a vacuum in which the infant's saliva sneaks into the mother's nipple. There, it is believed that mammary gland receptors interpret the "baby spit backwash" for bacteria and viruses and, if they detect something amiss, her body will actually change the milk's immunological composition, tailoring it to the baby's particular pathogens by producing customized antibodies.

I just read this on farcebook. How bloody marvellous is that?
Bach without a doubt.

Wowbagger

  • Sylph
    • Musings of a Gentleman Cyclist
Re: Random...
« Reply #36 on: 23 September, 2018, 09:54:31 am »
Yesterday I ordered another Islabike for our grand-daughter.

The blue one.

We are going to have a mint condition Rothan for sale soon. I just checked and new ones are now at £169.99.  :o I think we paid about £120 for this one, new, just over 6 years ago.
Bach without a doubt.

Wowbagger

  • Sylph
    • Musings of a Gentleman Cyclist
Re: Random...
« Reply #37 on: 25 September, 2018, 01:37:56 pm »
Blimey! That was quick! Their website said "out of stock" when I ordered it. Didn't expect it to be dispatched until tomorrow at the earliest. Now we have to find the opportunity to get back to Maidstone to deliver it. Could be tricky...
Bach without a doubt.

hellymedic

  • Just do it!
Re: Random...
« Reply #38 on: 27 September, 2018, 03:56:33 pm »
My heart bleeds!

ENJOY!

Wowbagger

  • Sylph
    • Musings of a Gentleman Cyclist
Re: Random...
« Reply #39 on: 02 September, 2020, 09:31:15 pm »
Our younger grandchild has just started junior school. His teacher, who holds a BA in Modern History & Politics, was taught these subject to A level by his mother...
Bach without a doubt.

Wowbagger

  • Sylph
    • Musings of a Gentleman Cyclist
Re: Random...
« Reply #40 on: 10 September, 2020, 10:53:01 am »
My grandson seems to have taken to school like a duck to water and his smiley, immature cuteness has made him a great favourite amongst the adults he deals with. His language is considerably less developed than is normal for a 4 year old, but he definitely isn't short of brain power. His mum and sister both have acute astigmatism and he had an eye test a few weeks ago, identifying pictures. The optician was bowled over when he answered "orca" and "tiger shark" instead of "whale" and "shark",which were the answers she was expecting. He is also very quick with puzzles of any sort

 When he speaks, certain unimportant words just don't form part of his used vocabulary - to, the, and etc. However, he recognises all his letters and is good at phonics. He is demonstrating what I think is a very unusual phenomenon - his learning to read is actually teaching him how to speak in correctly-constructed sentences. I think all the textbooks on the theory of language development say that this is supposed to be the other way round.

Identifying different species of shark seems pretty normal for a 4 year old but reading better than speaking is curious.

I take it his hearing has been fully checked...

Rather belatedly, he is about to start a course of treatment designed to correct Auditory Processing Disorder.
Bach without a doubt.

Kim

  • Timelord
Re: Random...
« Reply #41 on: 10 September, 2020, 01:32:47 pm »
My grandson seems to have taken to school like a duck to water and his smiley, immature cuteness has made him a great favourite amongst the adults he deals with. His language is considerably less developed than is normal for a 4 year old, but he definitely isn't short of brain power. His mum and sister both have acute astigmatism and he had an eye test a few weeks ago, identifying pictures. The optician was bowled over when he answered "orca" and "tiger shark" instead of "whale" and "shark",which were the answers she was expecting. He is also very quick with puzzles of any sort

 When he speaks, certain unimportant words just don't form part of his used vocabulary - to, the, and etc. However, he recognises all his letters and is good at phonics. He is demonstrating what I think is a very unusual phenomenon - his learning to read is actually teaching him how to speak in correctly-constructed sentences. I think all the textbooks on the theory of language development say that this is supposed to be the other way round.

Identifying different species of shark seems pretty normal for a 4 year old but reading better than speaking is curious.

I take it his hearing has been fully checked...

Rather belatedly, he is about to start a course of treatment designed to correct Auditory Processing Disorder.

*looks at dates on the above posts*

*sighs deeply*

(I wasn't aware that it CAPD could be corrected - beyond speech therapy type exercises.  Presumably it's mostly teaching the usual strategies for manipulating Stupid Hearing People into being clear.)
Careful, Kim. Your sarcasm's showing...

Cudzoziemiec

  • Моя планета голубая, я люблю тебя и обнимаю
Re: Random...
« Reply #42 on: 10 September, 2020, 01:46:39 pm »
Good luck to the Wowlet and all around him.
Riding a bike through a city is like navigating the collective neural pathways of a vast global mind.

Wowbagger

  • Sylph
    • Musings of a Gentleman Cyclist
Re: Random...
« Reply #43 on: 27 August, 2021, 10:59:48 pm »
My grandson seems to have taken to school like a duck to water and his smiley, immature cuteness has made him a great favourite amongst the adults he deals with. His language is considerably less developed than is normal for a 4 year old, but he definitely isn't short of brain power. His mum and sister both have acute astigmatism and he had an eye test a few weeks ago, identifying pictures. The optician was bowled over when he answered "orca" and "tiger shark" instead of "whale" and "shark",which were the answers she was expecting. He is also very quick with puzzles of any sort

 When he speaks, certain unimportant words just don't form part of his used vocabulary - to, the, and etc. However, he recognises all his letters and is good at phonics. He is demonstrating what I think is a very unusual phenomenon - his learning to read is actually teaching him how to speak in correctly-constructed sentences. I think all the textbooks on the theory of language development say that this is supposed to be the other way round.

Identifying different species of shark seems pretty normal for a 4 year old but reading better than speaking is curious.

I take it his hearing has been fully checked...

Rather belatedly, he is about to start a course of treatment designed to correct Auditory Processing Disorder.

*looks at dates on the above posts*

*sighs deeply*

(I wasn't aware that it CAPD could be corrected - beyond speech therapy type exercises.  Presumably it's mostly teaching the usual strategies for manipulating Stupid Hearing People into being clear.)

I can report that the treatment has been remarkably successful and Inigo's speech, and general ability to express himself, is now much better. He continues with therapy until December. It isn't cheap. Posthumous thanks to Phyllis.

My daughter is of the opinion that a large percentage of children being drugged up with ritalin for ADHD actually don't have ADHD but auditory processing disorder. She noticed this when she was teaching kids online and that those wearing headphones were often more attentive and successful than they had been in face-to-face lessons. She has conducted a few face-to-face experiments with kids diagnosed with ADHD and she finds that when wearing headphones - ie cutting out background noise - suddenly their attention span increases markedly.

Of course, kids in the state sector with APD will be in a far worse position than those in a private school as the classes are much larger and the level of background noise is consequently much greater. Now that Inigo has been diagnosed with APD, he should be statemented and have extra resources allocated to him, but there's some sort of Catch-22 whereby it wasn't diagnosed by the Ed Psych attached to his school and therefore he won't get a statement and the extra funding. I think it couldn't be diagnosed by the school's Ed Psych because everyone was in lockdown and kids weren't being seen.
Bach without a doubt.

Re: Random...
« Reply #44 on: 28 August, 2021, 02:58:58 pm »
Big ADHD-Autism crossover and Sensory issues are common with both (both my autistic children have SPD).  Just picked up on this thread, saw your initial post about grandson not using "the" and thought - that's like my son (who also shows a number of Autistic characteristics, but has not been diagnosed).
I think that what your daughter found does not necessarily suggest that it's not a neurodiverse issue, just that reducing/selecting sound helps.
Strange things are afoot at the circle K.

Wowbagger

  • Sylph
    • Musings of a Gentleman Cyclist
Re: Random...
« Reply #45 on: 28 August, 2021, 06:33:20 pm »
Big ADHD-Autism crossover and Sensory issues are common with both (both my autistic children have SPD).  Just picked up on this thread, saw your initial post about grandson not using "the" and thought - that's like my son (who also shows a number of Autistic characteristics, but has not been diagnosed).
I think that what your daughter found does not necessarily suggest that it's not a neurodiverse issue, just that reducing/selecting sound helps.

Agreed. She thinks it's worth a serious study though, and through grandson's treatment she has made contact with the sort of people who might be in a position to make this happen. It seems to me that clinicians treating APD are few and far between, and we know that Big Pharma likes to stuff people with tablets and then give a slice of the profits to the tory party.
Bach without a doubt.

Kim

  • Timelord
Re: Random...
« Reply #46 on: 28 August, 2021, 06:42:10 pm »
My daughter is of the opinion that a large percentage of children being drugged up with ritalin for ADHD actually don't have ADHD but auditory processing disorder. She noticed this when she was teaching kids online and that those wearing headphones were often more attentive and successful than they had been in face-to-face lessons. She has conducted a few face-to-face experiments with kids diagnosed with ADHD and she finds that when wearing headphones - ie cutting out background noise - suddenly their attention span increases markedly.

I think it's well-established that improving the signal-to-noise ratio benefits more than those with physical hearing impairments.  Radio aids for non-hearing-aid-users are increasingly a thing.  Also look up "sound field system".

Also consider that the easiest way to improve the SNR for everyone in a classroom environment involves Sensible Architectural Decisions, soft furnishings that are harder to clean, acoustic panelling, etc.  How much room in the budget there is for that sort of thing outside the occasional deaf unit or purpose-built music department left as an exercise for the reader...

(Also note the benefits of wearing active noise-cancelling headphones (rather than those that simply attenuate all sounds) with no input signal in a noisy face-to-face environment.  If you haven't experienced the effect, it's uncanny.  It's like someone turned down the "crowd noise" fader on the mixing desk.  They're being routinely used by people with auditory processing and/or overstimulation issues to cope with crowded environments.)
Careful, Kim. Your sarcasm's showing...

Cudzoziemiec

  • Моя планета голубая, я люблю тебя и обнимаю
Re: Random...
« Reply #47 on: 28 August, 2021, 06:44:00 pm »
Purpose-built music department? You're either thinking of private schools or a previous century.
Riding a bike through a city is like navigating the collective neural pathways of a vast global mind.

Kim

  • Timelord
Re: Random...
« Reply #48 on: 28 August, 2021, 06:46:58 pm »
Purpose-built music department? You're either thinking of private schools or a previous century.

Indeed.  Same probably goes for deaf units, tbh.
Careful, Kim. Your sarcasm's showing...

Wowbagger

  • Sylph
    • Musings of a Gentleman Cyclist
Re: Random...
« Reply #49 on: 03 September, 2021, 02:43:39 pm »
It seems to have occurred very abruptly, but yesterday my grand-daughter started secondary school.
Bach without a doubt.