Yet Another Cycling Forum

Off Topic => The Pub => Topic started by: Wowbagger on February 15, 2021, 09:37:32 pm

Title: Happy Decimalisation Day!
Post by: Wowbagger on February 15, 2021, 09:37:32 pm
It has just occurred to me whilst in conversation with Jan's sister - that today is the 50th anniversary of the decimalisation of our currency.

Don't tell Farage.
Title: Re: Happy Decimalisation Day!
Post by: Kim on February 15, 2021, 09:54:21 pm
Finally, something that makes me feel young.
Title: Re: Happy Decimalisation Day!
Post by: Jurek on February 15, 2021, 09:59:42 pm
Where's my thruppence?
Title: Re: Happy Decimalisation Day!
Post by: offcumden on February 15, 2021, 10:01:17 pm
I remember it well. I was teaching at a Nottinghamshire primary school at the time. One member of my class around that time must have found the decimal system handy (but for distance, not currency) when he went on to become a prodigious avaleur de kilometres, and is currently OTP.  Blimey, half a century ago; surely you (we!) can't be that old, Steve  ;).   

Title: Re: Happy Decimalisation Day!
Post by: orienteer on February 15, 2021, 10:05:11 pm
Diamondgeezer has brought back £sd:

https://diamondgeezer.blogspot.com/ (https://diamondgeezer.blogspot.com/)
Title: Re: Happy Decimalisation Day!
Post by: grams on February 15, 2021, 10:06:30 pm
The 100th anniversary is the only one that matters.
Title: Re: Happy Decimalisation Day!
Post by: mmmmartin on February 15, 2021, 10:14:21 pm
Thank heavens those days are over. Trying to work out the change you'd get after buying three lbs six oz of flour at 19/6d a hundredweight (cwt to be confusing) and handling over 17/6d was completely bonkers.
Title: Re: Happy Decimalisation Day!
Post by: asterix on February 16, 2021, 12:43:08 am
Just download an app on your mobile?

Why didn't anyone think of doing that back then?

Title: Re: Happy Decimalisation Day!
Post by: rogerzilla on February 16, 2021, 06:54:19 am
According to my mother, the old system made mental arithmetic easier, since few things are sold in tens.  Also, it was easier to work out a third or a quarter of prices.
Title: Re: Happy Decimalisation Day!
Post by: MikeFromLFE on February 16, 2021, 07:27:16 am
Brings back memories of my mother, who, being bemused at the new fangled money, would be told to count it up in tens on her fingers.
Much amusement and merriment (on my mother's part) when she produced her base 9 pair of hands.
She'd lost her left index finger in her first job in a meat slicing machine.
We knew how to have fun in t'olden days.
Title: Re: Happy Decimalisation Day!
Post by: De Sisti on February 16, 2021, 07:30:21 am
handling over 17/6d was completely bonkers.
A ten bob note, 7 shillings and a tanner. Simple. :thumbsup:
Title: Re: Happy Decimalisation Day!
Post by: T42 on February 16, 2021, 08:00:03 am
That means that 50 years ago today I was on a junket course in Eindhoven while some poor bugger back in Glasgow had to convert my programs to decimal.
Title: Re: Happy Decimalisation Day!
Post by: TimC on February 16, 2021, 08:23:28 am
handling over 17/6d was completely bonkers.
A ten bob note, 7 shillings and a tanner. Simple. :thumbsup:

More likely a ten bob note and three half-crowns.

We were holding a protest in the tuck shop as they'd sneakily upped the price of Blackjacks from 4-a-penny (960/£) to 4-a-new-halfpenny (800/£). Bastards.
Title: Re: Happy Decimalisation Day!
Post by: robgul on February 16, 2021, 08:24:48 am
handling over 17/6d was completely bonkers.
A ten bob note, 7 shillings and a tanner. Simple. :thumbsup:

... or seven half-crowns.

I have a complete set of the old coins and the 10/- £1 and £5 notes - kept for no other reason but notalgia (not that it's what it used to be  ;D)

The other thing that ceased with decimalisation was the 2d stamp on cheques - every cheque had a duty of twopence, with either an embossed stamp if you had an account with a posh bank, or a printed roundel for the hoi-polloi  (the cheque printing businesses had licences to print the stamp on cheques and then account for the money to HM Gov - I worked for one of the printers back then)
Title: Re: Happy Decimalisation Day!
Post by: robgul on February 16, 2021, 08:29:04 am
handling over 17/6d was completely bonkers.
A ten bob note, 7 shillings and a tanner. Simple. :thumbsup:

More likely a ten bob note and three half-crowns.

We were holding a protest in the tuck shop as they'd sneakily upped the price of Blackjacks from 4-a-penny (960/£) to 4-a-new-halfpenny (800/£). Bastards.

To me there is no doubt that the conversion contributed massively to price increases - as your Blackjack example.   IF we had implemented a "10 bob pound" then the base unit of 1p wouldn't have been such a massive 2.4 times the size of the old 1d.   

IIRC Australia changed from  £SD to dollars around the same time but did that on the "10 bob dollar" basis
Title: Re: Happy Decimalisation Day!
Post by: Giraffe on February 16, 2021, 08:54:06 am
A chippy in Teflon did a blatant fiddle. We used to stop at a pub opposite the chippy on our way to the club hut in N.Wales then across for foods.
Chips were 6d one week and 6p the next. The sign had just the descender scribbled out and an ascender put in. If it hadn't been for hunger, fueled by BEERS, I would have walked out - after a loud, suitable comment.
Title: Re: Happy Decimalisation Day!
Post by: De Sisti on February 16, 2021, 09:00:53 am
I do remember handing a two shilling coin, but never a half crown. Crowns and farthings were
before my time.
Title: Re: Happy Decimalisation Day!
Post by: TimC on February 16, 2021, 09:04:42 am
The half-crown was withdrawn only a year before decimalisation, in 1970.
Title: Re: Happy Decimalisation Day!
Post by: T42 on February 16, 2021, 09:18:18 am
The half-crown was a lovely coin. I wish I'd kept one as a souvenir but back then it was a whole pint of McEwan's.
Title: Re: Happy Decimalisation Day!
Post by: ian on February 16, 2021, 09:45:12 am
Finally, something that makes me feel young.

It's indeed reassuring that I don't have to rely completely on the what I'm listening to topics in A&E.
Title: Re: Happy Decimalisation Day!
Post by: Cudzoziemiec on February 16, 2021, 09:57:48 am
Diamondgeezer has brought back £sd:

https://diamondgeezer.blogspot.com/ (https://diamondgeezer.blogspot.com/)
Nothing to do with decimalisation from the blogspot that links to now:
Quote
St Helen's is the largest such place of worship to survive the Great Fire and the Blitz, although two IRA bombs caused a fair bit of damage in the 1990s so there's been a lot of touching up. The interior's broad and spacious with two naves, all the better to cram in the four different congregations who turn up on Sundays. Parishioners were setting up for the main morning service when I peered in, with Mandarin, Informal and Contemporary gatherings due later in the day.
Surely church services are all virtual now?
Title: Re: Happy Decimalisation Day!
Post by: fboab on February 16, 2021, 11:23:26 am
We had sixpennnies in our Christmas Pud (sorry- one of us got a sixpence in their portion of Christmas pud) well into the seventies. Were they just for decoration? I can't remember  :-\
Title: Re: Happy Decimalisation Day!
Post by: CommuteTooFar on February 16, 2021, 11:29:44 am
remember to spend your pennies in sixpenny lots
Title: Re: Happy Decimalisation Day!
Post by: PeteB99 on February 16, 2021, 11:32:51 am
For anyone wanting good old British currency instead of this filthy foreign decimal stuff it should be noted that £ s d (Librae, Solidi and denari) were introduced by Charlemagne when he sorted out the old Roman currency and are therefor French.
Title: Re: Happy Decimalisation Day!
Post by: sg37409 on February 16, 2021, 11:40:04 am
My younger brothers class's pet was a guinea pig called Decimal.  The got it on D-day.  Still remember him bringing it home for the weekend.
Title: Re: Happy Decimalisation Day!
Post by: Cudzoziemiec on February 16, 2021, 11:42:16 am
For anyone wanting good old British currency instead of this filthy foreign decimal stuff it should be noted that £ s d (Librae, Solidi and denari) were introduced by Charlemagne when he sorted out the old Roman currency and are therefor French.
So when people say 'Do me a solid!' they're actually asking for 5p?
 :D
Title: Re: Happy Decimalisation Day!
Post by: Basil on February 16, 2021, 12:12:29 pm
During one of our first gardening sessions at this house we found a silver thrupenny bit.
Title: Re: Happy Decimalisation Day!
Post by: Kim on February 16, 2021, 12:21:47 pm
According to my mother, the old system made mental arithmetic easier, since few things are sold in tens.  Also, it was easier to work out a third or a quarter of prices.

This seems to be the logic behind most firkin/furlong/farenheit units, and probably makes some sense[1] in a world before computers have been invented.


[1] Complicated carrying rules can be drummed into humans at a formative age, but division never gets easier.
Title: Re: Happy Decimalisation Day!
Post by: bairn again on February 16, 2021, 12:51:08 pm
I was 6 at the time so memories are a little hazy but I definitely recall the excitement on the day itself and all the shops having conversion charts.  I dont remember the old system at all.   

My mum still refers to decimal prices in old money, normally to highlight how expensive something is ("That's eleven and nine!!" or suchlike which somehow isn't 20).   

I got a windfall via a decommissoned one arm bandit that only took / dispensed sixpence coins that was abandoned in my mums office....iirc sixpences were still accepted a good bit longer than the other coins and this bounty kept myself and my 2 brothers going in chips and irn bru for quite some time.   :thumbsup:

("What sort of workplace open to a primary school child would have one armed bandits?" I hear you ask.  Well my mum had a cool job - she worked in the office of a chain of Scottish record shops and HQ was above their store in the wonderfully named Cow Wynd in Falkirk.  I used to go there at lunchtime and after school and their office was an Aladdin's cave of music industry stuff, normally flexi discs and t shirts and I think the bandit had been used in some kind of promo).   
Title: Re: Happy Decimalisation Day!
Post by: rogerzilla on February 16, 2021, 12:59:41 pm
Brexiteers are probably planning to bring it all back, assuming they can't go for broke and revert to groats.

Curiously, I remember one pound being approximately 20 Austrian schillings in 2000.
Title: Re: Happy Decimalisation Day!
Post by: Tim Hall on February 16, 2021, 01:04:41 pm
I was <fx:counts on fingers> 9, so at Primary school. It must have been half term, or we got a day off, as I remember going along the high street with a couple of friends doing a survey we had invented.  We showed it to Mr Edmondson,  the Headmaster, and got given a sweet each as a reward.

I've got the sets of coins Dad bought for me and my two sisters somewhere - they turned up when we emptied the house a couple of years ago.
Title: Re: Happy Decimalisation Day!
Post by: Cudzoziemiec on February 16, 2021, 01:41:05 pm
According to my mother, the old system made mental arithmetic easier, since few things are sold in tens.  Also, it was easier to work out a third or a quarter of prices.
Isn't it the other way round? Things were sold in fours and twelves and so on because of the measurement system in use? As evidence, I point to eggs in Poland, which are sold in fives and tens.
Title: Re: Happy Decimalisation Day!
Post by: Jaded on February 16, 2021, 02:08:48 pm
I'm afraid 5 eggs is silly.
Title: Re: Happy Decimalisation Day!
Post by: Cudzoziemiec on February 16, 2021, 02:12:28 pm
You're probably envisaging them in an egg box.
Title: Re: Happy Decimalisation Day!
Post by: PhilO on February 16, 2021, 02:12:50 pm
Curiously, I remember one pound being approximately 20 Austrian schillings in 2000.

I remember the same from the mid 90s. The German friend I was travelling with at the time couldn't understand how I could convert to Sterling so instinctively...

TBF, given that I was <1 year old at decimalisation, that's probably a fair question.
Title: Re: Happy Decimalisation Day!
Post by: PhilO on February 16, 2021, 02:16:26 pm
Quote from: Sir PTerry
“NOTE FOR YOUNG PEOPLE AND AMERICANS: One shilling = Five Pee. It helps to understand the antique finances of the Witchfinder Army if you know the original British monetary system:

Two farthings = One Ha'penny. Two ha'pennies = One Penny. Three pennies = A Thrupenny Bit. Two Thrupences = A Sixpence. Two Sixpences = One Shilling, or Bob. Two Bob = A Florin. One Florin and One Sixpence = Half a Crown. Four Half Crowns = Ten Bob Note. Two Ten Bob Notes = One Pound (or 240 pennies). Once Pound and One Shilling = One Guinea.

The British resisted decimalized currency for a long time because they thought it was too complicated.”

Title: Re: Happy Decimalisation Day!
Post by: PeteB99 on February 16, 2021, 02:44:30 pm
Brexiteers are probably planning to bring it all back, assuming they can't go for broke and revert to groats.

Curiously, I remember one pound being approximately 20 Austrian schillings in 2000.

Groats are foreign too - French or possibly Dutch. The good old penny comes from Old Germanic roots so is out as well.

Turnips will be the new currency.
Title: Re: Happy Decimalisation Day!
Post by: hellymedic on February 16, 2021, 02:52:48 pm
handling over 17/6d was completely bonkers.
A ten bob note, 7 shillings and a tanner. Simple. :thumbsup:

A ten bob note and three half-crowns (before 1/1/1970)...
Title: Re: Happy Decimalisation Day!
Post by: hellymedic on February 16, 2021, 02:59:08 pm
Curiously, I remember one pound being approximately 20 Austrian schillings in 2000.

I remember the same from the mid 90s. The German friend I was travelling with at the time couldn't understand how I could convert to Sterling so instinctively...

TBF, given that I was <1 year old at decimalisation, that's probably a fair question.

A shilling was only a bit less than a Danish Krone in the 1960s. The coins were a similar size and shape. Then Sterling devalued.
Title: Re: Happy Decimalisation Day!
Post by: Mr Larrington on February 16, 2021, 02:59:21 pm
Having no use for money before we moved to Germany in 1968 this Unit was weaned on decimal currency.  Unfortunately I then had a Several of months of florins, groats and Giant Pennies when we returned to Blighty in 1970.
Title: Re: Happy Decimalisation Day!
Post by: orienteer on February 16, 2021, 03:03:49 pm
Diamondgeezer has brought back £sd:

https://diamondgeezer.blogspot.com/ (https://diamondgeezer.blogspot.com/)
Nothing to do with decimalisation from the blogspot that links to now:
Quote
St Helen's is the largest such place of worship to survive the Great Fire and the Blitz, although two IRA bombs caused a fair bit of damage in the 1990s so there's been a lot of touching up. The interior's broad and spacious with two naves, all the better to cram in the four different congregations who turn up on Sundays. Parishioners were setting up for the main morning service when I peered in, with Mandarin, Informal and Contemporary gatherings due later in the day.
Surely church services are all virtual now?

A new blog is added at the top each day, you have to scroll down for earlier blogs
Title: Re: Happy Decimalisation Day!
Post by: TimC on February 16, 2021, 03:05:56 pm
A ten bob note and three half-crowns (before 1/1/1970)...

Barp! Repetition!

handling over 17/6d was completely bonkers.
A ten bob note, 7 shillings and a tanner. Simple. :thumbsup:

More likely a ten bob note and three half-crowns.

We were holding a protest in the tuck shop as they'd sneakily upped the price of Blackjacks from 4-a-penny (960/£) to 4-a-new-halfpenny (800/£). Bastards.
Title: Re: Happy Decimalisation Day!
Post by: T42 on February 16, 2021, 03:08:24 pm
"A penny, a penny, tuppence, and penny and a half and a halfpenny" - who?
Title: Re: Happy Decimalisation Day!
Post by: Tim Hall on February 16, 2021, 03:18:24 pm
"A penny, a penny, tuppence, and penny and a half and a halfpenny" - who?
hmm. Is it from Dickens? It looks like how many beans make five.
Title: Re: Happy Decimalisation Day!
Post by: Mr Larrington on February 16, 2021, 03:24:46 pm
"A penny, a penny, tuppence, and penny and a half and a halfpenny" - who?
hmm. Is it from Dickens? It looks like how many beans make five.

Quote from: Baldrick
Some beans?
Title: Re: Happy Decimalisation Day!
Post by: Basil on February 16, 2021, 03:45:21 pm
After decimalisation the new 5p coins were the same size and weight as the shilling.  (In fact old shillings remained in circulation for some time)
This was also the same size and weight as the German mark.  This made purchasing cigarettes from machines in Germany nice and cheap.  It also vastly improved the odds on those gambling machines they had in bars then. (Until you started to win back 5ps, which was when it was time for a sharp exit)
Title: Re: Happy Decimalisation Day!
Post by: TheLurker on February 16, 2021, 05:25:06 pm
Farthings & pence.  Late Victorias, 1806 George III and an 1890s 5C piece from Hong Kong just for giggles.
(https://i.ibb.co/XzCn6z5/Farthings-And-Pence.jpg)
Half-crowns.  I remember feeling as rich as Croesus if I was given one of these and a ten bob note was wealth beyond the dreams of avarice.
(https://i.ibb.co/wKqgLnH/Half-Crown.jpg)
Couple of silver 3d & a half sovereign.
(https://i.ibb.co/n7ZcHh1/Silver-Thruppennies.jpg)
Some wooden 3d & tanners (1).
(https://i.ibb.co/Xp7P3rk/Tanners-Wooden-Thruppenies.jpg)
Hardly in Smaug's league, but just in case the Faragists decide to take this whole 1950s shtick all the way. :)
(https://i.ibb.co/zFK0x9m/In-Case-Of-Brexit.jpg)

It's utterly impractical and (whisper it) a bit romantical, but the thing that I miss is the sense of history and a connection with the past in your pocket.  You could fish out a handful of small change and be handling coins that had been in circulation for well over a hundred years, possibly longer, with a huge variety of designs showing the profiles of two or three Emporers, the odd Empress and any number of plain old Kings.  Now?  Well a few pictures of Brenda and the designs?  Oh, merciful heavens!  Welcome to the kindergarten.  Would I go back?  Nah, decimal is a sensible system, but ...


(1) Why tanner?  *Possibly* because some several hundred years ago they were nick-named "Simons" after a Master of the Mint of that name and from the Biblical
quote,"... the apostle lodged with one Simon, a tanner."  (Acts 9:43; 10:6,32). Never let it be said our ancestors couldn't come up with a good bit of word play.

ETA.
In case you're wondering I *do* have a use for all that scrap metal.  Stacks of pennies, ha'pennies, two-bob bits & shillings make for excellent dihedral jigs when assembling the wings of model aircraft,
Title: Re: Happy Decimalisation Day!
Post by: FifeingEejit on February 16, 2021, 05:53:21 pm
(https://i.ibb.co/zFK0x9m/In-Case-Of-Brexit.jpg)
[/center]

More keyboard photos please!
Title: Re: Happy Decimalisation Day!
Post by: hellymedic on February 16, 2021, 06:02:14 pm
Brenda has been on all the coins because she's having a long reign. 68 years before she acceded the throne is well into Victoriana.

I loved the pre-decimal coins though.
Title: Re: Happy Decimalisation Day!
Post by: Mr Larrington on February 16, 2021, 06:10:56 pm
After decimalisation the new 5p coins were the same size and weight as the shilling.  (In fact old shillings remained in circulation for some time)
This was also the same size and weight as the German mark.  This made purchasing cigarettes from machines in Germany nice and cheap.  It also vastly improved the odds on those gambling machines they had in bars then. (Until you started to win back 5ps, which was when it was time for a sharp exit)

There was one pre-Euro Belgian coin – I forget which – that came in very handy for feeding car park ticket machines.  You must, of course, never do such a terrible thing.
Title: Re: Happy Decimalisation Day!
Post by: robgul on February 16, 2021, 07:43:46 pm
I have a mint Churchill Crown (5/- or 25p) that must been issued when he died ... and, in a plastic case, a Coronation Crown from 1953 (all schoolchidren were issued with one, I can remember getting mine together with a book about Essex (where we lived) which I still have somewhere . . . the coins are probably not worth anything  :(
Title: Re: Happy Decimalisation Day!
Post by: mllePB on February 16, 2021, 08:35:05 pm
I remember how exciting it was to get a few real shiny metal 1/2p, 1p and 2ps when we'd had plastic ones at school to teach us. I was 6 and staying with grandparents when the neighbour brought some round on the big day.  Thanks Mr Cooper!

Didn't quite get 'old money' but my favourite was the 6d (still have one), partly because the dodg'ems at Eiras park carried on taking them for years

Title: Re: Happy Decimalisation Day!
Post by: offcumden on February 16, 2021, 08:54:21 pm
I have a mint Churchill Crown (5/- or 25p) that must been issued when he died ... and, in a plastic case, a Coronation Crown from 1953 (all schoolchidren were issued with one, I can remember getting mine together with a book about Essex (where we lived) which I still have somewhere . . . the coins are probably not worth anything  :(

Pretty certain we've got most of those commemorative coins, courtesy of my late mother-in-law, who collected that sort of stuff.  As part of the Essex diaspora (escapees!), we too still have copies of the book ,"Royalty in Essex" I think it was called. Must look it out, mostly to see if it is as nauseatingly forelock-touching as I remember.
Title: Re: Happy Decimalisation Day!
Post by: Cudzoziemiec on February 16, 2021, 09:20:46 pm
According to the source of much knowledge and misinformation aka Wikipedia, the world's first decimal currency was the Russian rouble:
Quote
Russia converted to a decimal currency under Tsar Peter the Great in 1704, with the ruble being equal to 100 kopeks, thus making the Russian ruble the world's first decimal currency.[2]
And there are effectively no non-decimal currencies left in use:
Quote
Today, only two countries have non-decimal currencies: Mauritania, where 1 ouguiya = 5 khoums, and Madagascar, where 1 ariary = 5 iraimbilanja.[1] However, these are only theoretically non-decimal, as in both cases the value of the main unit is so low that the sub-units are too small to be of any practical use and coins of the sub-units are no longer used.
So I wonder which will be the first to reverse the trend?

Other gems: Cyprus decimalized in 1955 on the basis of a subdivision of 1000 rather than 100, and Bermuda managed to introduce a decimal dollar and keep the penny, by setting one dollar at 8 shillings 4 pence = 100 pence. And Nova Scotia's decimal coinage, ordered from Britain in 1860, was lost in the post and didn't turn up till two years later.

Title: Re: Happy Decimalisation Day!
Post by: Nuncio on February 16, 2021, 09:40:44 pm
I think I remember being amused by a news vox pop with an old woman on a bus, complaining how decimalisation was unfair on old people, and that 'they should wait for all of us to die before they introduce it'.
Title: Re: Happy Decimalisation Day!
Post by: hellymedic on February 16, 2021, 09:52:07 pm
My grandmother was fine with decimalisation, which was a few weeks before she turned 73.

She was used to Dutch currency, frequently holidaying in Scheveningen...
Title: Re: Happy Decimalisation Day!
Post by: Wowbagger on February 16, 2021, 11:27:04 pm
The half-crown was a lovely coin. I wish I'd kept one as a souvenir but back then it was a whole pint of McEwan's.

Really? I began my under-age drinking career in 1970 or 1971 and we were paying 1s 2d a pint then for basic keg bitter. I think double diamond was a penny more.

By the time I got to college and could drink legally, ISTR the college bar charge 11p a pint, although it we went to the catholic club we could get ale for 9p a pint.
Title: Re: Happy Decimalisation Day!
Post by: T42 on February 17, 2021, 08:58:19 am
When I started in Edinburgh in 1965 Younger's IPA was 1/9d and McEwan's 2/2d.  They were much heavier beers than those sold in the south.  I found the beer down in London very watery and a bit soapy in comparison.
Title: Re: Happy Decimalisation Day!
Post by: rogerzilla on February 17, 2021, 10:16:05 am
When the Scots came up with 80/ ale, they didn't mean 80/ a pint!
Title: Re: Happy Decimalisation Day!
Post by: Jaded on February 17, 2021, 10:18:13 am
80/- a barrel.

I’m sure it tasted lovely in 1965. By the late ‘70s Scottish beer was gassed and pasteurised to death.
Title: Re: Happy Decimalisation Day!
Post by: ian on February 17, 2021, 10:43:22 am
I just looked up old money. It's mental. 240 pence in a pound? With that and imperial measures to have contended with, I'd be pissing my pants, gibbering at people in the park, and voting for Brexit now.

I dimly recall beer being 75p/pint when I started sneaking into the pub in the mid-to-late eighties.
Title: Re: Happy Decimalisation Day!
Post by: Jaded on February 17, 2021, 10:55:35 am
I think when I started drinking beer it was 12p a pint or thereabouts. Can’t remember...
Title: Re: Happy Decimalisation Day!
Post by: ian on February 17, 2021, 11:03:20 am
I have a vague recollection that my part-time job at the Coop netted me £1.75/hour, which is how I funded that habit. When we'd get busted by the police, they'd drink half your pint and pour the rest in the trays, and then drive off. Bastards.
Title: Re: Happy Decimalisation Day!
Post by: De Sisti on February 17, 2021, 11:23:46 am
I just looked up old money. It's mental. 240 pence in a pound? With that and imperial measures to have contended with, I'd be pissing my pants, gibbering at people in the park,
If that was what you grew up with then it wasn't a problem. :thumbsup:
Title: Re: Happy Decimalisation Day!
Post by: robgul on February 17, 2021, 12:22:03 pm
The half-crown was a lovely coin. I wish I'd kept one as a souvenir but back then it was a whole pint of McEwan's.

Really? I began my under-age drinking career in 1970 or 1971 and we were paying 1s 2d a pint then for basic keg bitter. I think double diamond was a penny more.

By the time I got to college and could drink legally, ISTR the college bar charge 11p a pint, although it we went to the catholic club we could get ale for 9p a pint.

Don't want to start a fight here but I think you must have been drinking halves at those prices - in 1970 the "official statistics" give 2/11d a pint in old money as the average for ordinary (and it was vey ordinary!) beer - that's about 14.5p in new money.   My memory of prices as far back as 1963 for beer when I first frequented pubs was about 1/10d a print (that's ~9.5p)

... the other frightening comparison is that when I first had a car in May 1965 you could buy just over 4 GALLONS of petrol for £1.00.
Title: Re: Happy Decimalisation Day!
Post by: yorkie on February 17, 2021, 02:55:58 pm
After decimalisation the new 5p coins were the same size and weight as the shilling.  (In fact old shillings remained in circulation for some time)
This was also the same size and weight as the German mark.  This made purchasing cigarettes from machines in Germany nice and cheap.  It also vastly improved the odds on those gambling machines they had in bars then. (Until you started to win back 5ps, which was when it was time for a sharp exit)


I remember the first time I went on the school exchange between York and Muenster (Westfalen) in the mid 80s. Our German exchange partners wrote to pretty much all of us begging us to bring a large bag of 5p coins with us. We didn't have a clue why, until we arrived and did a tour of all the local sweet/drink/cigarette machines**  :-D


** delete as appropriate for age range...
Title: Re: Happy Decimalisation Day!
Post by: TimC on February 17, 2021, 03:39:05 pm
The half-crown was a lovely coin. I wish I'd kept one as a souvenir but back then it was a whole pint of McEwan's.

Really? I began my under-age drinking career in 1970 or 1971 and we were paying 1s 2d a pint then for basic keg bitter. I think double diamond was a penny more.

By the time I got to college and could drink legally, ISTR the college bar charge 11p a pint, although it we went to the catholic club we could get ale for 9p a pint.

Don't want to start a fight here but I think you must have been drinking halves at those prices - in 1970 the "official statistics" give 2/11d a pint in old money as the average for ordinary (and it was vey ordinary!) beer - that's about 14.5p in new money.   My memory of prices as far back as 1963 for beer when I first frequented pubs was about 1/10d a print (that's ~9.5p)

... the other frightening comparison is that when I first had a car in May 1965 you could buy just over 4 GALLONS of petrol for £1.00.


In the Black Lion in Naphill where as a 16yo I was a regular (and mean shot on the darts team) at the point of decimalisation a pint of light and bitter was 2/10. It went up to 15p on D Day, and I think it hit 20p not very long after that. At the time I had a holiday job as a tiler's mate, and got paid (IIRC) 3/- an hour - so a day's work was a skinful!
Title: Re: Happy Decimalisation Day!
Post by: Jurek on February 17, 2021, 03:52:14 pm
We used to pay 27p a pint when we became regulars at The Hope in West Norwood.
We used the school's art facilities to screen print T-shirts touting Young's brews, which the pub would flog.
Imagine our shock when, on a school field trip to Scarborough, we found pubs selling beer at 22p a pint.
Title: Re: Happy Decimalisation Day!
Post by: TheLurker on February 17, 2021, 04:07:08 pm
I have a mint Churchill Crown (5/- or 25p) that must been issued when he died ... and, in a plastic case, a Coronation Crown from 1953 ...

Some more scrap metal for you.  A couple of Churchill crowns (1965), a Coronation crown and shrapnel for various royal anniversaries. Brenda & Phil the Greek's silver wedding, HM Brenda's Silver Jubilee and something for QEQM in 1980. Dunno what that was for, her 3 millionth Dubonnet & Gin?
(https://i.ibb.co/vYbZnkM/Crowns.jpg)
Title: Re: Happy Decimalisation Day!
Post by: fimm on February 17, 2021, 05:01:32 pm
Decimalisation was before I was born, but my parents kept an old money box shaped like a globe with old coins in it which we used to play with when we were old enough.
My grandmother used to put sixpennies in the Christmas pudding - wrapped in greaseproof paper so there was no chance of anyone swallowing one! Given that they were no use, they were given back to go in next year's pudding...
Title: Re: Happy Decimalisation Day!
Post by: hellymedic on February 17, 2021, 05:04:30 pm
Brenda's Mum turned 80 in 1980 so maybe it was celebrating her 80th.

I was never a beer drinker but noticed almost EVERYTHING that cost half a crown was 20p soon after decimalisation.

I was more au fait with the price of Mars bars, Black Jacks and Fruit Salad at the time.
Title: Re: Happy Decimalisation Day!
Post by: robgul on February 17, 2021, 06:52:39 pm
I have a mint Churchill Crown (5/- or 25p) that must been issued when he died ... and, in a plastic case, a Coronation Crown from 1953 ...

Some more scrap metal for you.  A couple of Churchill crowns (1965), a Coronation crown and shrapnel for various royal anniversaries. Brenda & Phil the Greek's silver wedding, HM Brenda's Silver Jubilee and something for QEQM in 1980. Dunno what that was for, her 3 millionth Dubonnet & Gin?
(https://i.ibb.co/vYbZnkM/Crowns.jpg)

Ah - I forgot I have Jubilee one too
Title: Re: Happy Decimalisation Day!
Post by: mllePB on February 17, 2021, 07:46:57 pm
I think I remember being amused by a news vox pop with an old woman on a bus, complaining how decimalisation was unfair on old people, and that 'they should wait for all of us to die before they introduce it'.

In primary school maths in the mid-70s, when learning metric measurements, our class was told that it just needed the grown-ups to get used to it, like decimal currency...

I'm still waiting
Title: Re: Happy Decimalisation Day!
Post by: Wowbagger on February 17, 2021, 08:36:37 pm
80/- a barrel.

I’m sure it tasted lovely in 1965. By the late ‘70s Scottish beer was gassed and pasteurised to death.

I was under the impression that the 80/- was the duty to be paid on a barrel, ergo more on strong ales than weak ones.
Title: Re: Happy Decimalisation Day!
Post by: Jaded on February 18, 2021, 02:06:03 am
Up to a point, I believe. Stronger beers were more expensive because of a higher duty, and the shilling category reflected that. But the shillings related to the price of a barrel at some pount.
Title: Re: Happy Decimalisation Day!
Post by: Mr Larrington on February 18, 2021, 03:19:35 am
Pete Brown’s æxcellent tome Man Walks Into A Pub probably explains it but I'd have to find it first.
Title: Re: Happy Decimalisation Day!
Post by: Cudzoziemiec on February 22, 2021, 09:48:45 am
I thought the word penny derived from the Roman denarius, but apparently it was originally the pending, named for Penda, king of Mercia (d. 654) although established as a stable national currency by Offa a century later. Or so says P.J. Helm.

More curiously, in 774 Offa issued a gold coin, worth 30 silver pennies, with the words Offa Rex on the reverse but on the obverse an Arabic script taken from a dinar of Al-Mansur. It seems the Arabs at this time were known not only for preserving and furthering the scientific, medical and mathematical knowledge of the Greco-Roman world, but also for their gold coinage. Thus, even in Britain, it was felt that a gold coin had to feature Arabic script to be real.