Author Topic: Happy Decimalisation Day!  (Read 2239 times)

robgul

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Re: Happy Decimalisation Day!
« Reply #50 on: February 16, 2021, 07:43:46 pm »
I have a mint Churchill Crown (5/- or 25p) that must been issued when he died ... and, in a plastic case, a Coronation Crown from 1953 (all schoolchidren were issued with one, I can remember getting mine together with a book about Essex (where we lived) which I still have somewhere . . . the coins are probably not worth anything  :(
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Re: Happy Decimalisation Day!
« Reply #51 on: February 16, 2021, 08:35:05 pm »
I remember how exciting it was to get a few real shiny metal 1/2p, 1p and 2ps when we'd had plastic ones at school to teach us. I was 6 and staying with grandparents when the neighbour brought some round on the big day.  Thanks Mr Cooper!

Didn't quite get 'old money' but my favourite was the 6d (still have one), partly because the dodg'ems at Eiras park carried on taking them for years


offcumden

  • Oh, no!
Re: Happy Decimalisation Day!
« Reply #52 on: February 16, 2021, 08:54:21 pm »
I have a mint Churchill Crown (5/- or 25p) that must been issued when he died ... and, in a plastic case, a Coronation Crown from 1953 (all schoolchidren were issued with one, I can remember getting mine together with a book about Essex (where we lived) which I still have somewhere . . . the coins are probably not worth anything  :(

Pretty certain we've got most of those commemorative coins, courtesy of my late mother-in-law, who collected that sort of stuff.  As part of the Essex diaspora (escapees!), we too still have copies of the book ,"Royalty in Essex" I think it was called. Must look it out, mostly to see if it is as nauseatingly forelock-touching as I remember.

Cudzoziemiec

  • Eating all the pies and drinking all the tea.
Re: Happy Decimalisation Day!
« Reply #53 on: February 16, 2021, 09:20:46 pm »
According to the source of much knowledge and misinformation aka Wikipedia, the world's first decimal currency was the Russian rouble:
Quote
Russia converted to a decimal currency under Tsar Peter the Great in 1704, with the ruble being equal to 100 kopeks, thus making the Russian ruble the world's first decimal currency.[2]
And there are effectively no non-decimal currencies left in use:
Quote
Today, only two countries have non-decimal currencies: Mauritania, where 1 ouguiya = 5 khoums, and Madagascar, where 1 ariary = 5 iraimbilanja.[1] However, these are only theoretically non-decimal, as in both cases the value of the main unit is so low that the sub-units are too small to be of any practical use and coins of the sub-units are no longer used.
So I wonder which will be the first to reverse the trend?

Other gems: Cyprus decimalized in 1955 on the basis of a subdivision of 1000 rather than 100, and Bermuda managed to introduce a decimal dollar and keep the penny, by setting one dollar at 8 shillings 4 pence = 100 pence. And Nova Scotia's decimal coinage, ordered from Britain in 1860, was lost in the post and didn't turn up till two years later.

Riding a bike through a city is like navigating the collective neural pathways of a vast global mind.

Re: Happy Decimalisation Day!
« Reply #54 on: February 16, 2021, 09:40:44 pm »
I think I remember being amused by a news vox pop with an old woman on a bus, complaining how decimalisation was unfair on old people, and that 'they should wait for all of us to die before they introduce it'.

hellymedic

  • Just do it!
Re: Happy Decimalisation Day!
« Reply #55 on: February 16, 2021, 09:52:07 pm »
My grandmother was fine with decimalisation, which was a few weeks before she turned 73.

She was used to Dutch currency, frequently holidaying in Scheveningen...

Wowbagger

  • Sylph
    • Musings of a Gentleman Cyclist
Re: Happy Decimalisation Day!
« Reply #56 on: February 16, 2021, 11:27:04 pm »
The half-crown was a lovely coin. I wish I'd kept one as a souvenir but back then it was a whole pint of McEwan's.

Really? I began my under-age drinking career in 1970 or 1971 and we were paying 1s 2d a pint then for basic keg bitter. I think double diamond was a penny more.

By the time I got to college and could drink legally, ISTR the college bar charge 11p a pint, although it we went to the catholic club we could get ale for 9p a pint.
Bach without a doubt.

T42

  • *** fool in a hurry
Re: Happy Decimalisation Day!
« Reply #57 on: February 17, 2021, 08:58:19 am »
When I started in Edinburgh in 1965 Younger's IPA was 1/9d and McEwan's 2/2d.  They were much heavier beers than those sold in the south.  I found the beer down in London very watery and a bit soapy in comparison.
I've dusted all those old bottles and set them up straight.

Re: Happy Decimalisation Day!
« Reply #58 on: February 17, 2021, 10:16:05 am »
When the Scots came up with 80/ ale, they didn't mean 80/ a pint!
And Darkness and Decay and the Coronavirus held illimitable dominion over all.

Jaded

  • The Codfather
  • Formerly known as Jaded
Re: Happy Decimalisation Day!
« Reply #59 on: February 17, 2021, 10:18:13 am »
80/- a barrel.

I’m sure it tasted lovely in 1965. By the late ‘70s Scottish beer was gassed and pasteurised to death.
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ian

  • feat. Undead Jess & Finestre, Queen of Hell
Re: Happy Decimalisation Day!
« Reply #60 on: February 17, 2021, 10:43:22 am »
I just looked up old money. It's mental. 240 pence in a pound? With that and imperial measures to have contended with, I'd be pissing my pants, gibbering at people in the park, and voting for Brexit now.

I dimly recall beer being 75p/pint when I started sneaking into the pub in the mid-to-late eighties.
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Jaded

  • The Codfather
  • Formerly known as Jaded
Re: Happy Decimalisation Day!
« Reply #61 on: February 17, 2021, 10:55:35 am »
I think when I started drinking beer it was 12p a pint or thereabouts. Can’t remember...
If you don't like your democracy, vote against it.

ian

  • feat. Undead Jess & Finestre, Queen of Hell
Re: Happy Decimalisation Day!
« Reply #62 on: February 17, 2021, 11:03:20 am »
I have a vague recollection that my part-time job at the Coop netted me £1.75/hour, which is how I funded that habit. When we'd get busted by the police, they'd drink half your pint and pour the rest in the trays, and then drive off. Bastards.
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Re: Happy Decimalisation Day!
« Reply #63 on: February 17, 2021, 11:23:46 am »
I just looked up old money. It's mental. 240 pence in a pound? With that and imperial measures to have contended with, I'd be pissing my pants, gibbering at people in the park,
If that was what you grew up with then it wasn't a problem. :thumbsup:

robgul

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Re: Happy Decimalisation Day!
« Reply #64 on: February 17, 2021, 12:22:03 pm »
The half-crown was a lovely coin. I wish I'd kept one as a souvenir but back then it was a whole pint of McEwan's.

Really? I began my under-age drinking career in 1970 or 1971 and we were paying 1s 2d a pint then for basic keg bitter. I think double diamond was a penny more.

By the time I got to college and could drink legally, ISTR the college bar charge 11p a pint, although it we went to the catholic club we could get ale for 9p a pint.

Don't want to start a fight here but I think you must have been drinking halves at those prices - in 1970 the "official statistics" give 2/11d a pint in old money as the average for ordinary (and it was vey ordinary!) beer - that's about 14.5p in new money.   My memory of prices as far back as 1963 for beer when I first frequented pubs was about 1/10d a print (that's ~9.5p)

... the other frightening comparison is that when I first had a car in May 1965 you could buy just over 4 GALLONS of petrol for £1.00.
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yorkie

  • On top of the Galibier
Re: Happy Decimalisation Day!
« Reply #65 on: February 17, 2021, 02:55:58 pm »
After decimalisation the new 5p coins were the same size and weight as the shilling.  (In fact old shillings remained in circulation for some time)
This was also the same size and weight as the German mark.  This made purchasing cigarettes from machines in Germany nice and cheap.  It also vastly improved the odds on those gambling machines they had in bars then. (Until you started to win back 5ps, which was when it was time for a sharp exit)


I remember the first time I went on the school exchange between York and Muenster (Westfalen) in the mid 80s. Our German exchange partners wrote to pretty much all of us begging us to bring a large bag of 5p coins with us. We didn't have a clue why, until we arrived and did a tour of all the local sweet/drink/cigarette machines**  :-D


** delete as appropriate for age range...
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TimC

  • Old blerk sometimes onabike.
Re: Happy Decimalisation Day!
« Reply #66 on: February 17, 2021, 03:39:05 pm »
The half-crown was a lovely coin. I wish I'd kept one as a souvenir but back then it was a whole pint of McEwan's.

Really? I began my under-age drinking career in 1970 or 1971 and we were paying 1s 2d a pint then for basic keg bitter. I think double diamond was a penny more.

By the time I got to college and could drink legally, ISTR the college bar charge 11p a pint, although it we went to the catholic club we could get ale for 9p a pint.

Don't want to start a fight here but I think you must have been drinking halves at those prices - in 1970 the "official statistics" give 2/11d a pint in old money as the average for ordinary (and it was vey ordinary!) beer - that's about 14.5p in new money.   My memory of prices as far back as 1963 for beer when I first frequented pubs was about 1/10d a print (that's ~9.5p)

... the other frightening comparison is that when I first had a car in May 1965 you could buy just over 4 GALLONS of petrol for £1.00.


In the Black Lion in Naphill where as a 16yo I was a regular (and mean shot on the darts team) at the point of decimalisation a pint of light and bitter was 2/10. It went up to 15p on D Day, and I think it hit 20p not very long after that. At the time I had a holiday job as a tiler's mate, and got paid (IIRC) 3/- an hour - so a day's work was a skinful!

Re: Happy Decimalisation Day!
« Reply #67 on: February 17, 2021, 03:52:14 pm »
We used to pay 27p a pint when we became regulars at The Hope in West Norwood.
We used the school's art facilities to screen print T-shirts touting Young's brews, which the pub would flog.
Imagine our shock when, on a school field trip to Scarborough, we found pubs selling beer at 22p a pint.

TheLurker

  • Goes well with magnolia.
Re: Happy Decimalisation Day!
« Reply #68 on: February 17, 2021, 04:07:08 pm »
I have a mint Churchill Crown (5/- or 25p) that must been issued when he died ... and, in a plastic case, a Coronation Crown from 1953 ...

Some more scrap metal for you.  A couple of Churchill crowns (1965), a Coronation crown and shrapnel for various royal anniversaries. Brenda & Phil the Greek's silver wedding, HM Brenda's Silver Jubilee and something for QEQM in 1980. Dunno what that was for, her 3 millionth Dubonnet & Gin?

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Re: Happy Decimalisation Day!
« Reply #69 on: February 17, 2021, 05:01:32 pm »
Decimalisation was before I was born, but my parents kept an old money box shaped like a globe with old coins in it which we used to play with when we were old enough.
My grandmother used to put sixpennies in the Christmas pudding - wrapped in greaseproof paper so there was no chance of anyone swallowing one! Given that they were no use, they were given back to go in next year's pudding...

hellymedic

  • Just do it!
Re: Happy Decimalisation Day!
« Reply #70 on: February 17, 2021, 05:04:30 pm »
Brenda's Mum turned 80 in 1980 so maybe it was celebrating her 80th.

I was never a beer drinker but noticed almost EVERYTHING that cost half a crown was 20p soon after decimalisation.

I was more au fait with the price of Mars bars, Black Jacks and Fruit Salad at the time.

robgul

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Re: Happy Decimalisation Day!
« Reply #71 on: February 17, 2021, 06:52:39 pm »
I have a mint Churchill Crown (5/- or 25p) that must been issued when he died ... and, in a plastic case, a Coronation Crown from 1953 ...

Some more scrap metal for you.  A couple of Churchill crowns (1965), a Coronation crown and shrapnel for various royal anniversaries. Brenda & Phil the Greek's silver wedding, HM Brenda's Silver Jubilee and something for QEQM in 1980. Dunno what that was for, her 3 millionth Dubonnet & Gin?


Ah - I forgot I have Jubilee one too
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Re: Happy Decimalisation Day!
« Reply #72 on: February 17, 2021, 07:46:57 pm »
I think I remember being amused by a news vox pop with an old woman on a bus, complaining how decimalisation was unfair on old people, and that 'they should wait for all of us to die before they introduce it'.

In primary school maths in the mid-70s, when learning metric measurements, our class was told that it just needed the grown-ups to get used to it, like decimal currency...

I'm still waiting

Wowbagger

  • Sylph
    • Musings of a Gentleman Cyclist
Re: Happy Decimalisation Day!
« Reply #73 on: February 17, 2021, 08:36:37 pm »
80/- a barrel.

I’m sure it tasted lovely in 1965. By the late ‘70s Scottish beer was gassed and pasteurised to death.

I was under the impression that the 80/- was the duty to be paid on a barrel, ergo more on strong ales than weak ones.
Bach without a doubt.

Jaded

  • The Codfather
  • Formerly known as Jaded
Re: Happy Decimalisation Day!
« Reply #74 on: February 18, 2021, 02:06:03 am »
Up to a point, I believe. Stronger beers were more expensive because of a higher duty, and the shilling category reflected that. But the shillings related to the price of a barrel at some pount.
If you don't like your democracy, vote against it.