Author Topic: Garmin 830 Best Files to use for longer rides? Does it crash on longer rides?  (Read 2444 times)

Pete Mas

  • Don't Worry 'bout a thing...
FIT files are recommended for the 830, but I've found that the the detailed turn by turn instruction is lost later on in a ride if I try to use it for a very long ride. I could split the track into sections (not so good for Strava) or do longer rides work better on using GPX or TCX instaed of FIT?

Does the Garmin 830 also crash on long rides like earlier Garmins do, after a certain distance?
''It is better to travel hopefully than to arrive."

R.L.Stevenson

Zed43

  • prefers UK hills over Dutch mountains
I create .gpx tracks in Basecamp (at most 200km in length) and use those for navigation on the 830. Works well and gets me turn by turn instructions.

I think I recorded PBP in a single file (but also used a 530 as backup, saving at every control) but I know for sure I have recorded 400km. Overall the 830 has been an epitome of reliability for me. Can't really compare to the 820 I had before (replaced because of USB connector failure) as I did save longer rides into shorter sections back then.

citoyen

  • Occasionally rides a bike
I could split the track into sections (not so good for Strava)

Not really answering your question, but if you do split the track into sections, it's easy to splice them back together into a single track using Gotoes -
https://gotoes.org/strava/Combine_GPX_TCX_FIT_Files.php

(download the separate GPX/FIT files from Garmin Connect or Strava and upload them to Gotoes, then reupload the combined file to Strava)
"The future's all yours, you lousy bicycles."

JonB

  • Granny Ring ... Yes Please!
I've got the 530 which I believe is close to being the 830 without the touchscreen.
I've been using GPX files, I think I had a go with FIT but I couldn't really see the advantage so stuck with GPX (maybe I need to have another go and see what the difference is).
I've not had it crash yet. It did an odd thing on the 600 I did last year, at about 500km it drew a straight routing line from where where I was back to the finish, the purple line showing the track remained on the map so I could still follow the intended route but I don't think I got turn instructions after the line was drawn. There were no issues with recorded ride. I've used it on a few 300s and one 400 without issue but am interested to see whether the straight line issue will reoccur on long rides.

Pingu

  • Put away those fiery biscuits!
  • Mrs Pingu's domestique
    • the Igloo
...Does the Garmin 830 also crash on long rides like earlier Garmins do, after a certain distance?

My earlier eTrex doesn't crash after a certain distance. I'm pretty sure a lot of earlier Garmins don't.

Feanor

  • It's mostly downhill from here.
...Does the Garmin 830 also crash on long rides like earlier Garmins do, after a certain distance?

My earlier eTrex doesn't crash after a certain distance. I'm pretty sure a lot of earlier Garmins don't.

I think that was a feature of the Edge 800 only.

The crash was nothing to do with distance. It was based on number of track points. If it went over 10,000 you’d get the crash, regardless of distance. I think the later versions have removed the track point limit.

If you still have an older unit you can still navigate super long rides , you just need to filter the track points below the 10,000 figure.

Etrex 10/20/30 just truncate tracks (you are navigating) at 9,999 rather than crash. But a track log going over 9,999 can crash them.

Pete Mas

  • Don't Worry 'bout a thing...
Brilliant replies all. You have helped a lot. As to whether FIT or GPX is better, I guess I'll try both to compare. Probably what I experienced with my old Garmin 800 towards the end of a long ride, i.e. loss of turn by turn, FIT file showing a smaller and smaller on screen track, hard to view turns at roundabouts, etc, was due to too many track points on 600km file. On my next long ride I will split the ride into shorter sections, and join together at the end for Strava purposes.
''It is better to travel hopefully than to arrive."

R.L.Stevenson