Author Topic: Media coverage  (Read 1551 times)

Media coverage
« on: September 03, 2017, 02:14:32 pm »
I saw in the Guardian today a very nice photographic report of the Ultra Trail du Mont-Blanc(UTMB).

https://www.theguardian.com/sport/gallery/2017/sep/03/taking-on-the-ultra-trail-du-mont-blanc-in-pictures

The UTMB is probably a rough equivalent of  a shorter LEL on your two feet: a 170 km route, a time limit of 21h for the racers, 46h for normal people, about 14 intermediate controls who are run like LEL controls with food, beds, etc., and it takes place over three countries: France, Italy, and Switzerland. There where 2300 entrants this year, so the event is not much bigger than LEL.

So I was wondering why is there, in British media,  such a coverage of events that take place far abroad, and not a word (except in some local papers) on a fantastic event that takes place every four years between two of the capital cities of Britain? I don't want to criticize anyone, Danial, Phil, Roger, and all the volunteers, are already doing a huge amount of work, but I think it would be very useful, for the future of LEL, to have some sort of press agent to deal with these matters. Am I the only one to think this way? I know the usual answer is often on the line of "People in Britain dislike cycling", but this situation can only change if LEL gets the media coverage it deserves!

Re: Media coverage
« Reply #1 on: September 03, 2017, 02:23:14 pm »
Why do you want it to be more public?

Re: Media coverage
« Reply #2 on: September 03, 2017, 02:46:34 pm »
You have to distinguish between stuff on the Guardian website, and in print. A good result would be an article in the Daily Mail, emphasising the achievement of women on LEL. That's got the highest circulation, and the most visited website.

Lots on here would sniff at that though. They want an article by Zoe Williams on page 6 of the Saturday Guardian emphasising the communitarian aspects of LEL.

Re: Media coverage
« Reply #3 on: September 03, 2017, 02:55:12 pm »
For cycling, The Guardian (via contributors like Peter Walker, etc) tends to focus on cycling issues. The rest of the coverage is about the big events such as Tour/Giro/Vuelta/Classics/Worlds/etc.

For running there are fewer issues (barring the recent controvesy over the pedestrian push on Putney Bridge) and so it's more about running itself with good coverage of various events. The lifestyle/running editor of the Guardian also has links to many of the ultra althletes (e.g. Susie Chan and Adharanand Finn) so it's common to see coverage of those events.
"Yes please" said Squirrel "biscuits are our favourite things."

Re: Media coverage
« Reply #4 on: September 03, 2017, 07:47:57 pm »
Why do you want it to be more public?

I could turn the question back to you and ask: "Why do you want to keep it secret?"  ;)

I think many people involved in LEL, riders and volunteers as well, tend to enjoy being part of a sort of underground event. I can understand this point, but the ever growing size of the event reveals the limits of this approach. Being an underground event means you have no support from local communities, no local recruiting of volunteers, no money from local authorities. On the other hand, being a widely publicized event means a wider pool of potential volunteers, and possibly new sources of financing. Look at PBP for example, the city council of St-Quentin-en-Yvelines strongly supports all the organization around the start/finish of the ride. I think PBP would be a lesser event without this support.  LEL does not benefit from a similar support, but I think a better media coverage would help in this regard.

Re: Media coverage
« Reply #5 on: September 03, 2017, 10:03:32 pm »
Why do you want it to be more public?

I could turn the question back to you and ask: "Why do you want to keep it secret?"  ;)

I think many people involved in LEL, riders and volunteers as well, tend to enjoy being part of a sort of underground event. I can understand this point, but the ever growing size of the event reveals the limits of this approach. Being an underground event means you have no support from local communities, no local recruiting of volunteers, no money from local authorities. On the other hand, being a widely publicized event means a wider pool of potential volunteers, and possibly new sources of financing. Look at PBP for example, the city council of St-Quentin-en-Yvelines strongly supports all the organization around the start/finish of the ride. I think PBP would be a lesser event without this support.  LEL does not benefit from a similar support, but I think a better media coverage would help in this regard.

Why do you assume I want to keep it secret - I just asked a question!

But yes, I do like the idea of a clandestine ride sneaking through the countryside.  But that's just my preference and it's not "my" ride.  I'd still want to be involved, whatever.  As for the "ever-growing size of the event", that's not a given for the future and it's already had some down sides.  There was total local community support from Eskdalemuir - we used their community centre and they did the catering.  But the size of the event may mean that this lovely control becomes unviable, though that is not my reason for liking the idea of a sneaky ride. It's just a feeling!

But it's all a fair thing for discussion.

Peter

Jaded

  • The Codfather
  • Formerly known as Jaded
Re: Media coverage
« Reply #6 on: September 03, 2017, 10:36:26 pm »
I'd simply ask the question: "What is the aim of the Media coverage".

Start with what you'd like to achieve and then tailor the contact with the media accordingly.

e.g.

- More volunteers?
- Increasing awareness of long distance cycling amongst the general population?
- Countering concerns and prejudices in the general population about long distance cycling?
- More riders?
- More venues?
- Personal aggrandisement?
If you don't like your democracy, vote against it.

Re: Media coverage
« Reply #7 on: October 12, 2017, 09:55:03 am »
There's a six page article in this month's Cycling Plus under my byline. I'm a bit peeved with myself that I didn't make it clearer that half of the pictures are by Dave Robinson, my long-term collaborator.

I was introduced to the deputy editor, Paul Robson, at Loudeac on PBP 2015, by an AUK who had ridden with him from Fougeres, and we supplied C+ with images, hence the connection. Paul has incorporated quotes from interviews I sent him, and from Danial, as Paul obviously has a better idea of what appeals to his readers.

I grew up with parents who were active in clubs; drama/ musical comedy and sailing, so I saw how the show was put on, from behind the scenes, from the age of 5. The brief was to look at how LEL is put together. As with am-dram, there are limits to how much you want to criticise any unpaid endeavour.

I feel that a by-product of a more professional approach, is that the event can draw in people who aren't steeped in the amateur tradition. They look for clues about the nature of the event in places such as this, and don't realise that there are codes to be adhered to in describing how rides have played out. The one thing you never do in am-dram is to undermine the confidence of the principals, and that's reflected in how Audax reports itself to itself.

In terms of expectation management, I envisage LEL and PBP as amateur versions of the Tour de France, seeking to involve the Women's Institute. That requires the riders to have knowledge of both the TdF and the WI. It was encapsulated for me by Bradley Wiggins' joke on the TdF 2012 podium, wondering when he had to draw the raffle. The roots of all cycle sport are in village halls with tea urns and trestle tables.


Re: Media coverage
« Reply #8 on: October 13, 2017, 02:17:26 pm »
"The roots of all cycle sport are in village halls with tea urns and trestle tables."

But outside convenience stores and motels in the states.   :)

Re: Media coverage
« Reply #9 on: October 13, 2017, 02:22:53 pm »
I interviewed Ken Bonner outside the convenience store in Alston.

In 2005 it was a lay-by with a dumpster in it, I interviewed Akiko Kawachi in that lay-by in 2005, and outside the convenience store this year.

StuAff

  • Folding not boring
Re: Media coverage
« Reply #10 on: October 14, 2017, 06:38:29 pm »
There's a six page article in this month's Cycling Plus under my byline. I'm a bit peeved with myself that I didn't make it clearer that half of the pictures are by Dave Robinson, my long-term collaborator.

I was introduced to the deputy editor, Paul Robson, at Loudeac on PBP 2015, by an AUK who had ridden with him from Fougeres, and we supplied C+ with images, hence the connection. Paul has incorporated quotes from interviews I sent him, and from Danial, as Paul obviously has a better idea of what appeals to his readers.

I grew up with parents who were active in clubs; drama/ musical comedy and sailing, so I saw how the show was put on, from behind the scenes, from the age of 5. The brief was to look at how LEL is put together. As with am-dram, there are limits to how much you want to criticise any unpaid endeavour.

I feel that a by-product of a more professional approach, is that the event can draw in people who aren't steeped in the amateur tradition. They look for clues about the nature of the event in places such as this, and don't realise that there are codes to be adhered to in describing how rides have played out. The one thing you never do in am-dram is to undermine the confidence of the principals, and that's reflected in how Audax reports itself to itself.

In terms of expectation management, I envisage LEL and PBP as amateur versions of the Tour de France, seeking to involve the Women's Institute. That requires the riders to have knowledge of both the TdF and the WI. It was encapsulated for me by Bradley Wiggins' joke on the TdF 2012 podium, wondering when he had to draw the raffle. The roots of all cycle sport are in village halls with tea urns and trestle tables.
Great stuff ESL, thanks. Like the picture of my riding bud Mike on p129, he was delighted.

Terry2wheelz

  • terry2wheelz
Re: Media coverage
« Reply #11 on: November 04, 2017, 01:48:17 pm »
Well that is a real boost & treat for sad eyes !
I'm currently laid up in bed in agony -  doped up to eyeballs after my Hernia operation 2 days ago.
Surgeon couldn't perform the planned Keyhole" procedure so he's slit me open like a kipper & I'm in agony wondering if I'll ever pedal again...

My wonderful Mrs. has just nipped out & bought me Novembers Cycling Plus mag & I noted with interest that LEL is featured within..  I don't normally do social media malarkey -  truth be known I've only just got a flat screen TV, so I'm a bit owd' fashioned.  But I've received a real boost to my spirits as there's a picture of me inside magazine on LEL route.  I might resemble a beached whale, but seeing my rider No. M47 has really made me smile.  just thought I'd share it with you all.  Now back to bed with Codine pills.     
Terry from Bury. 
Fat Cyclists Bounce Better !

Re: Media coverage
« Reply #12 on: November 04, 2017, 06:31:37 pm »
Get well, Tel!  (always the rhymer!). You were missed at CTC in Manchester last night.

Peter

Re: Media coverage
« Reply #13 on: November 23, 2017, 11:51:38 pm »
I'm with Peter , i love the way the ride slips very quietly through the night . i spent a good time riding with a spanish chap , and when we met his chums they all said , they were seasoned PBP veterans , that LEL was the best , because it offered a real ride in great country , where the emphasis was upon the individual. This , and I'm not spanish but from norfolk, resonated with my own feelings. leave all the 'jazz' to the ride london etc .....
of course its just my own view and how i felt , but who doesn't love sneaking through villages in the middle of the night , uh oh that last might sound a bit creepier than intended ...