Author Topic: Random...  (Read 3886 times)

Re: Random...
« Reply #25 on: September 29, 2017, 12:33:27 pm »
My son started school here just before Easter of Year 2. He'd previously done a bit of school in Poland, where 6 is the normal starting age. He was definitely behind all the other kids in reading and writing – not for language reasons but because he just had no idea how to write any words, as opposed to strings of letters – and I think also maths when he started, but soon caught up. As Greenbank says, it's really just structured play.
The earth is vast and beautiful and contains many miraculous places. (Chekhov)

Wowbagger

  • Dez's butler
    • Musings of a Gentleman Cyclist
Re: Random...
« Reply #26 on: October 08, 2017, 12:04:57 am »
My grandson seems to have taken to school like a duck to water and his smiley, immature cuteness has made him a great favourite amongst the adults he deals with. His language is considerably less developed than is normal for a 4 year old, but he definitely isn't short of brain power. His mum and sister both have acute astigmatism and he had an eye test a few weeks ago, identifying pictures. The optician was bowled over when he answered "orca" and "tiger shark" instead of "whale" and "shark",which were the answers she was expecting. He is also very quick with puzzles of any sort

 When he speaks, certain unimportant words just don't form part of his used vocabulary - to, the, and etc. However, he recognises all his letters and is good at phonics. He is demonstrating what I think is a very unusual phenomenon - his learning to read is actually teaching him how to speak in correctly-constructed sentences. I think all the textbooks on the theory of language development say that this is supposed to be the other way round.
Basses lower the tone.

Kim

  • 2nd in the world
Re: Random...
« Reply #27 on: October 08, 2017, 02:45:36 pm »
He is demonstrating what I think is a very unusual phenomenon - his learning to read is actually teaching him how to speak in correctly-constructed sentences. I think all the textbooks on the theory of language development say that this is supposed to be the other way round.

Ah yes, the barakta principle.
To ride the Windcheetah, first, you must embrace the cantilever...

hellymedic

  • Just do it!
Re: Random...
« Reply #28 on: October 08, 2017, 03:00:34 pm »
Another BMJ obit snippet:

Quote
... came home after a shift and found a letter written earlier in the day by 4 year old ****. “Dear mummy, I hoape you don’t git to tired at hospidol looking at the pashnts—If you do in the midol of a pashnt finish the pashnt then come home. Love from ****.” “With amazing maturity,” Turner-Warwick says, “she had understood the priorities.

Re: Random...
« Reply #29 on: October 10, 2017, 04:55:09 pm »
Not exactly from a kid, but from my son before he set off on his travelling:

"I'm not looking forward to the 24hour flight from Canada to Australia. I don't know why it's so long, they aren't all that far from each other."
<i>Marmite slave</i>

Re: Random...
« Reply #30 on: October 10, 2017, 05:14:24 pm »
My grandson seems to have taken to school like a duck to water and his smiley, immature cuteness has made him a great favourite amongst the adults he deals with. His language is considerably less developed than is normal for a 4 year old, but he definitely isn't short of brain power. His mum and sister both have acute astigmatism and he had an eye test a few weeks ago, identifying pictures. The optician was bowled over when he answered "orca" and "tiger shark" instead of "whale" and "shark",which were the answers she was expecting. He is also very quick with puzzles of any sort

 When he speaks, certain unimportant words just don't form part of his used vocabulary - to, the, and etc. However, he recognises all his letters and is good at phonics. He is demonstrating what I think is a very unusual phenomenon - his learning to read is actually teaching him how to speak in correctly-constructed sentences. I think all the textbooks on the theory of language development say that this is supposed to be the other way round.
Identifying different species of shark seems pretty normal for a 4 year old but reading better than speaking is curious.

Edit: Learning sentence construction from reading is of course normal for older kids and adults.
The earth is vast and beautiful and contains many miraculous places. (Chekhov)

Re: Random...
« Reply #31 on: October 10, 2017, 07:23:26 pm »
It seems to be a little known fact that school attendance in England and Wales is NOT compulsory.  If you start, then you would need to formally opt out - but it is a formality.  You don't have to start.

hellymedic

  • Just do it!
Re: Random...
« Reply #32 on: October 10, 2017, 10:32:37 pm »
My grandson seems to have taken to school like a duck to water and his smiley, immature cuteness has made him a great favourite amongst the adults he deals with. His language is considerably less developed than is normal for a 4 year old, but he definitely isn't short of brain power. His mum and sister both have acute astigmatism and he had an eye test a few weeks ago, identifying pictures. The optician was bowled over when he answered "orca" and "tiger shark" instead of "whale" and "shark",which were the answers she was expecting. He is also very quick with puzzles of any sort

 When he speaks, certain unimportant words just don't form part of his used vocabulary - to, the, and etc. However, he recognises all his letters and is good at phonics. He is demonstrating what I think is a very unusual phenomenon - his learning to read is actually teaching him how to speak in correctly-constructed sentences. I think all the textbooks on the theory of language development say that this is supposed to be the other way round.

Identifying different species of shark seems pretty normal for a 4 year old but reading better than speaking is curious.

I take it his hearing has been fully checked...

Re: Random...
« Reply #33 on: October 11, 2017, 11:15:23 am »
My grandson seems to have taken to school like a duck to water and his smiley, immature cuteness has made him a great favourite amongst the adults he deals with. His language is considerably less developed than is normal for a 4 year old, but he definitely isn't short of brain power. His mum and sister both have acute astigmatism and he had an eye test a few weeks ago, identifying pictures. The optician was bowled over when he answered "orca" and "tiger shark" instead of "whale" and "shark",which were the answers she was expecting. He is also very quick with puzzles of any sort

 When he speaks, certain unimportant words just don't form part of his used vocabulary - to, the, and etc. However, he recognises all his letters and is good at phonics. He is demonstrating what I think is a very unusual phenomenon - his learning to read is actually teaching him how to speak in correctly-constructed sentences. I think all the textbooks on the theory of language development say that this is supposed to be the other way round.

I take it his hearing has been fully checked...
Identifying different species of shark seems pretty normal for a 4 year old but reading better than speaking is curious.
Yeah, I was thinking possibly some speech impediment but hearing is probably more likely, if there is a physical problem.
The earth is vast and beautiful and contains many miraculous places. (Chekhov)

clarion

  • Tyke
Re: Random...
« Reply #34 on: October 12, 2017, 09:34:07 am »
I note the rapid advance of marine biology among smalls following the advent of the Octonauts.  We have been asked about some unusual denizens of the deep.
Getting there...

Wowbagger

  • Dez's butler
    • Musings of a Gentleman Cyclist
Re: Random...
« Reply #35 on: February 01, 2018, 08:36:29 pm »
Quote
According to Katie Hinde, PhD, a biologist and associate professor at the Center for Evolution and Medicine at the School of Human Evolution & Social Change at Arizona State University, when a baby suckles, it creates a vacuum in which the infant's saliva sneaks into the mother's nipple. There, it is believed that mammary gland receptors interpret the "baby spit backwash" for bacteria and viruses and, if they detect something amiss, her body will actually change the milk's immunological composition, tailoring it to the baby's particular pathogens by producing customized antibodies.

I just read this on farcebook. How bloody marvellous is that?
Basses lower the tone.

Wowbagger

  • Dez's butler
    • Musings of a Gentleman Cyclist
Re: Random...
« Reply #36 on: September 23, 2018, 09:54:31 am »
Yesterday I ordered another Islabike for our grand-daughter.

The blue one.

We are going to have a mint condition Rothan for sale soon. I just checked and new ones are now at £169.99.  :o I think we paid about £120 for this one, new, just over 6 years ago.
Basses lower the tone.

Wowbagger

  • Dez's butler
    • Musings of a Gentleman Cyclist
Re: Random...
« Reply #37 on: September 25, 2018, 01:37:56 pm »
Blimey! That was quick! Their website said "out of stock" when I ordered it. Didn't expect it to be dispatched until tomorrow at the earliest. Now we have to find the opportunity to get back to Maidstone to deliver it. Could be tricky...
Basses lower the tone.

hellymedic

  • Just do it!
Re: Random...
« Reply #38 on: September 27, 2018, 03:56:33 pm »
My heart bleeds!

ENJOY!