Author Topic: Teenagers (not) working  (Read 4937 times)

Feanor

  • It's mostly downhill from here.
Re: Teenagers (not) working
« Reply #50 on: October 07, 2016, 06:37:07 pm »
Junior has just been accepted as a Deliveroo cycle courier in Edinburgh.

This is something he's just gone and done himself; it was presented as fait accompli ( a technique he probably inherited from me... ).



Feanor

  • It's mostly downhill from here.
Re: Teenagers (not) working
« Reply #51 on: October 23, 2016, 09:59:37 pm »
It's taken a few weeks for all the bureaucracy to work, but he did his first deliveroo shift this weekend.
5.5 hours, for £52.
He's saving for a Uni Ski club trip which he's going to self-finance.

Ride Report:
"25 miles, not too much , but very start - stoppey and quite hilly and cobblestoney."



Wowbagger

  • Dez's butler
    • Musings of a Gentleman Cyclist
Re: Teenagers (not) working
« Reply #52 on: October 24, 2016, 10:31:57 am »
That's over £2 per mile! :thumbsup:
Basses lower the tone.

Oscar's dad

  • Cheers!
Re: Teenagers (not) working
« Reply #53 on: October 24, 2016, 10:39:51 am »
Our teenager (getting on for 17yo) is still not working, I am getting increasingly fed up with the situation  >:(

Feanor

  • It's mostly downhill from here.
Re: Teenagers (not) working
« Reply #54 on: October 24, 2016, 09:57:25 pm »
I'd chill about that.
Junior is 18 now and has only just started his first work.

Childhood is such a short time, and it seems to be getting shorter with all the pressure of exams etc.
I think the pressure is more than it was when I was a kid.

I'd let them be for now.

Re: Teenagers (not) working
« Reply #55 on: October 24, 2016, 10:07:22 pm »
I still have my lad at home, 1st class degree and free hot and cold everything.
'Absence of evidence is not evidence of absence'.

Martin John Rees.

Re: Teenagers (not) working
« Reply #56 on: October 24, 2016, 10:08:30 pm »
It's taken a few weeks for all the bureaucracy to work, but he did his first deliveroo shift this weekend.
5.5 hours, for £52.
He's saving for a Uni Ski club trip which he's going to self-finance.

Ride Report:
"25 miles, not too much , but very start - stoppey and quite hilly and cobblestoney."

I fekkin *HATE* the cobblestones.

Oscar's dad

  • Cheers!
Re: Teenagers (not) working
« Reply #57 on: October 25, 2016, 06:04:09 am »
I'd chill about that.
Junior is 18 now and has only just started his first work.

Childhood is such a short time, and it seems to be getting shorter with all the pressure of exams etc.
I think the pressure is more than it was when I was a kid.

I'd let them be for now.

She's only at college 4 days a week so working a few hours isn't really a hardship. Plus she'll learn some useful stuff, might enjoy herself and earn some cash to boot.

I was working part-time when I was 14 or so and looking back can see how it's benefited me in later life. At the time I spent my earnings on sailing boats and kit and got a massive amount of enjoyment from it.

Re: Teenagers (not) working
« Reply #58 on: November 24, 2016, 08:41:28 am »
Mine did apply for a deliveroo job but was barred on the grounds he is too young to deliver beer. He didn't get the cafe job due to lack of experience (!) He has now got a shift at a boutique hotel five miles away. He works with a couple of other Sixth Form mates, a six hour shift every week or so, serving at parties. Finishes at midnight so I pick him up. Gets £7.90 per hour which is ok for a 16 year old.

I think it's also good for him to work - as he's at a Grammar school and leading a pretty gilded life - in terms of grounding him.

Karla

  • car(e) free
    • Lost Byway - a Pacific bike ride
Re: Teenagers (not) working
« Reply #59 on: November 24, 2016, 09:29:21 am »
£20 a WEEK?  I'd say he's rolling in clover.

To put some proportion on it, my step daughter is about to go to uni. After fees and uni digs, she'll have £30 a month for food.

Is she in some special situation where she doesn't get the tuition fee loans that everyone else gets?

barakta

  • Bastard lovechild of Yomiko Readman and Johnny 5
Re: Teenagers (not) working
« Reply #60 on: November 24, 2016, 10:40:18 am »
Many of my students' full loan does not cover their rented accommodation costs nevermind living costs.

Student accommodation costs (uni owned and private, harder to distinguish these days) have gone up scary amounts in the last 5-10yrs.

Karla

  • car(e) free
    • Lost Byway - a Pacific bike ride
Re: Teenagers (not) working
« Reply #61 on: November 24, 2016, 10:44:25 am »
I know (  :o ) but he mentioned fees.

barakta

  • Bastard lovechild of Yomiko Readman and Johnny 5
Re: Teenagers (not) working
« Reply #62 on: November 24, 2016, 10:54:52 am »
Probably just legacy language maybe? The fee loan covers the fees, but there are still technically fees...

Re: Teenagers (not) working
« Reply #63 on: November 25, 2016, 09:29:33 am »
Probably just legacy language maybe? The fee loan covers the fees, but there are still technically fees...

My loose use of language.

After paying uni costs, uni halls costs, she has sod all money left and is the traditional penniless starving student. Her current idea of a really good time (well, her big request for a 21st birthday was to be bought an indian takeaway) is a decent meal.
Due to various changes in our circumstances, we are down about £200 a month in income, shortly to be offset by MrsC taking up a new full-time job. So we don't have a lot that we can afford to direct her way.
<i>Marmite slave</i>

Re: Teenagers (not) working
« Reply #64 on: December 29, 2016, 05:41:01 pm »
Hi

Advice needed peeps.

My son's shift at the posh hotel is going fine. He's doing about 7-12 hours per week, at about £7 per hour.

He's in Lower Sixth and is saving to pay for his trip to Malawi next Summer as some expedition thing.

However, he wants to earn more and was considering Deliveroo (again). He's only 16 so can't deliver booze but can food, etc. He like their zero-hours thing as it gives him flexitime to work around his studies.

However, I'm not sure I want him cycling as a messenger for a company such as Deliveroo - all the health and safety stuff, primarily. He's fit and physically confident but doesn't cycle (he's a rugby/basket ball player).

Am I wise to discourage him?

Oscar's dad

  • Cheers!
Re: Teenagers (not) working
« Reply #65 on: December 29, 2016, 05:55:11 pm »
I don't know anything about Deliveroo but I'd not discourage him as the sort of "get up and go" your lad is exhibiting is commendable! 

Re: Teenagers (not) working
« Reply #66 on: December 29, 2016, 06:02:26 pm »
As someone who cycles ~30 miles a day across the capital to get to and from work I'd say, at best, if he's not a regular cyclist, he'll need to be pretty savvy and have some fast learning skills if he wants to make the deliveroo thing long term.
Or be lucky.
But, like Oscar's Dad, I see your lad's attitude as one which is commendable.

In the interests of reducing the risks, some 1on1 urban cycling tuition probably wouldn't go amiss - but I understand that may take him beyond the realms of his budget.
Some local councils offer Bikeability cycling tuition for free, I don't know if yours does.

Jaded

  • The Codfather
  • Formerly known as Jaded
Re: Teenagers (not) working
« Reply #67 on: December 29, 2016, 06:13:27 pm »
Which city?

I've rarely seen Deliveroo rider sticking to the law, so I assumed that was either because they didn't know it, or they had to get deliveries done as quickly as possible to make any money.
If you don't like your democracy, vote against it.

Re: Teenagers (not) working
« Reply #68 on: December 29, 2016, 09:21:05 pm »
I'm in Kingston-upon-Thames. I also trained as a Cycling Instructor over the Summer for the Borough so I could train him myself. The borough also offers free 1-2-1 cycle training.

The Deliveroo cyclists round here are just clumsy and not savvy.

I'll have a ponder. I'm not sure I want him cycling unless he 'gets' cycling, and at 16 his body is developing. Tbh I'd prefer it if he just got a job as a pint collector in a pub somewhere. I think messenging is for Uni aged students, where they have more mature confidence in dealing with other road users.

I think he'll be too passive.


Re: Teenagers (not) working
« Reply #69 on: December 29, 2016, 09:28:33 pm »
And thanks for the feedback everyone.

Re: Teenagers (not) working
« Reply #70 on: December 30, 2016, 01:05:59 am »
I'd have thought if he's mature enough to - as a non-cycling teenager - take on the assertiveness and road-positioning lessons of Bikeability, it'll probably stand him in good stead when learning to drive or ride a moped in the next few years.

My concern about Deliveroo is more about their disguised employment model, and the way it's designed to shift as many costs and risks as possible onto their couriers. Mind you, I suppose the same factors didn't bother me too much when I worked as a cycle courier when I was a student, though that was full-time rather than odd evenings. (It was also 20-odd years ago, and I suspect wages haven't gone up.)

Pedal Castro

  • so talented I can run with scissors - ouch!
    • Two beers or not two beers...
Re: Teenagers (not) working
« Reply #71 on: December 30, 2016, 08:29:52 am »
Hi

Advice needed peeps.

My son's shift at the posh hotel is going fine. He's doing about 7-12 hours per week, at about £7 per hour.

He's in Lower Sixth and is saving to pay for his trip to Malawi next Summer as some expedition thing.

However, he wants to earn more and was considering Deliveroo (again). He's only 16 so can't deliver booze but can food, etc. He like their zero-hours thing as it gives him flexitime to work around his studies.

However, I'm not sure I want him cycling as a messenger for a company such as Deliveroo - all the health and safety stuff, primarily. He's fit and physically confident but doesn't cycle (he's a rugby/basket ball player).

Am I wise to discourage him?

I would say that 7-12 hours/week is as much as I would recommend for someone in the L6, anymore and it may impact too much on study. Better option if he needs more money would be a full time summer holiday job (strike that, of course that's when he is going to Malawi). What I did when my kids were working/saving for such trips was to match their savings £ for £, which effectively doubled their rate of pay. You could even link it to school grades and/or time spent on homework if that needs more motivation.

Jaded

  • The Codfather
  • Formerly known as Jaded
Re: Teenagers (not) working
« Reply #72 on: December 30, 2016, 08:57:04 am »
Daughter and a friend raised money by working (daughter had two jobs, a Saturday one and a evening restaurant one, Friday, Saturday) and by getting sponsorship on 'Cycling the distance to Malawi'. She did this by cycling to school and going out for long runs in holidays. She got the restaurant she worked in to lay on a fundraising evening and she got coverage in the local press.

We didn't tell her but we were on standby to fill a funding gap.
If you don't like your democracy, vote against it.

Re: Teenagers (not) working
« Reply #73 on: December 30, 2016, 02:02:17 pm »
Cheers all.

We've already told him we'll provide the extra cash if he raises half of what he needs. It's basically the cost of the flight.

I've also decided he can't work more than the two shifts per week as suggested above.

I will also recommend he takes the free Bikeability courses as he can then messenger at Uni if he wants to.

Rider: Of course, all this is liable to change due to peer pressure if his mates decide they have the wherewithal to work more and still get their grades. They all had a sponsored walk to Brighton from Twickenham for the Malawi thing a couple of months ago. They managed 40 miles before giving up. He said it was the hardest thing he'd ever done physically, and he's a tough rugby player. Not a bad effort, so they have chutzpah.