Author Topic: what little stove?  (Read 20453 times)

Karla

  • car(e) free
    • Lost Byway - around the world by bike
Re: Stove for a loner
« Reply #75 on: 28 February, 2021, 04:00:39 pm »
For the sake of a few seconds extra boil time, I'd use a cartridge top stove (I like the Soto Amicus, the MSR Pocket Rocket is a common good one, then there are lots of others), which as Mark says, will fit inside your pan along with a lighter and a gas canister.  The piezo on my Soto lasted about 3 months' constant camping use, so long enough for you to get plenty of mid-ride brew ups if you don't want to carry a lighter, and given it's only a mid-ride brew up, you aren't stuck in the desert without a stove if it does break.  Saving the bulk on a day ride is, I guess, more convenient to you than a slightly faster boil. 

Cudzoziemiec

  • Моя планета голубая, я люблю тебя и обнимаю
Re: Stove for a loner
« Reply #76 on: 28 February, 2021, 04:12:45 pm »

Stoves. I hope you plan to cook the can of worms you just opened :p
Of course they do.

Riding a bike through a city is like navigating the collective neural pathways of a vast global mind.

Re: Stove for a loner
« Reply #77 on: 28 February, 2021, 04:35:27 pm »
 Coleman.  Works in freezing conditions (butane blends won't) and plenty of power. 
Through the angel rain, through the dust and the gasoline, through the cruelty of strangers, to the neon dream

Cudzoziemiec

  • Моя планета голубая, я люблю тебя и обнимаю
Re: Stove for a loner
« Reply #78 on: 28 February, 2021, 04:42:25 pm »
I have a cartridge-top stove, a remote-cannister stove with preheat loop, and a meths stove. I've never used a jet boil, a Trangia-type meths stove, or a petrol stove. The one I've use most by a long margin is the cartridge-top item, but that's because I've had it by far the longest (since 1996). I bought it originally for tramping (as they call hiking in the southern hemisphere) and it's good for that because, as everyone's already said, it's small and light. It suffers in the wind – I got a windbreak for it that fits round the top of the cannister – and it's unstable on anything less than a perfectly level surface, which is why there's a small patch of burnt grass surrounded by half-cooked pasta in Napton-on-the-Hill.

So I got the remote cannister one. I reckon it's more efficient, it's definitely more stable, and it's better in the wind because, being lower to the ground, it gets more protection from a windbreak. It's also a bit bulkier, though not much heavier, and I think it was a bit more expensive (I can't remember the price of the cart-top stove back in 1996 but I know I was on a budget!).

The meths (I keep typing methanol then having to delete) stove I've only used once, cos as soon as I got it, this pandemic thing happened. But based on that, it's pretty fast. It's not controllable – it's either burning or not – though it does have a simmer ring, I haven't used it – but you can most definitely blow it out, and easily, no matter how much fuel is in it. You can also store fuel in it. It is tiny and weighs nothing. Being low (right on the ground) it is easy to shield from the wind. Don't yet know what it's like for proper cooking... But another advantage it has is not running out of gas unexpectedly (you can easily see how much meths is left in your bottle) and not having to dispose of a metal cannister.

However, if I were just wanting a roadside brew, as opposed to proper camp cooking, I would and do take a thermos. Especially on an audax where (for me) time is usually tight. But rather than put it in a bottle cage, I'd put in saddlebag (or whatever luggage you have); that way it will stay warm much longer and also won't rattle!

Riding a bike through a city is like navigating the collective neural pathways of a vast global mind.

Kim

  • Timelord
Re: Stove for a loner
« Reply #79 on: 28 February, 2021, 04:49:21 pm »
But another advantage it has is not running out of gas unexpectedly (you can easily see how much meths is left in your bottle) and not having to dispose of a metal cannister.

I reckon this is a real advantage for cycle touring, plus you can skiddle liquid fuels between containers (so you can top up a bottle that fits nicely on the bike[1] before setting off and know you've got enough for a week or so).  With gas you need to carry two canisters most of the time.

Not so much for a roadside brew, where you merely need to be sure the canister isn't too perilously close to empty.


[1] Those pure butane catering-stove cartridges fit nicely on the bike.  And can be used with a remote-cannister stove if you know what you're doing.  But they're strictly a warm-weather thing.

Cudzoziemiec

  • Моя планета голубая, я люблю тебя и обнимаю
Re: Stove for a loner
« Reply #80 on: 28 February, 2021, 04:51:55 pm »
Agreed. If you just want a roadside brew, and fancy the fun of making it on the spot rather than taking a flask, you probably want gas, and by the sounds of things probably a jet boil type, for speed.
Riding a bike through a city is like navigating the collective neural pathways of a vast global mind.

quixoticgeek

  • Mostly Harmless
Re: Stove for a loner
« Reply #81 on: 28 February, 2021, 05:49:44 pm »
I disagree that you cannot stop a meths or solid fuel burner once lit.

https://www.ultralightoutdoorgear.co.uk/equipment-c3/stoves-c12/meths-stoves-c141/eby254-titanium-alcohol-stove-p40

This is the burner I have. How do I pour the fuel back into the bottle if I only burnt half of it? Or how do I stop it leaking all over my pot when I put it back in there?

J
--
Beer, bikes, and backpacking
http://b.42q.eu/

Davef

Stove for a loner
« Reply #82 on: 28 February, 2021, 06:01:30 pm »
I disagree that you cannot stop a meths or solid fuel burner once lit.

https://www.ultralightoutdoorgear.co.uk/equipment-c3/stoves-c12/meths-stoves-c141/eby254-titanium-alcohol-stove-p40

This is the burner I have. How do I pour the fuel back into the bottle if I only burnt half of it? Or how do I stop it leaking all over my pot when I put it back in there?

J
That one maybe. My one is similar but with a screw on lid so I carry fuel in it. Putting the lid on extinguishes it. Not titanium though. With yours you could drill a drainage hole in the bottom and fit a bung.

Edit:
Titanium with lid is available -https://gbr.grandado.com/products/lixada-portable-mini-titanium-alcoho-stove-with-lid-cross-stove-stand-rack-outdoor-camping-hiking-backpacking-alcohol-stove?variant=36798887755925&gclid=EAIaIQobChMItr63-ZSN7wIVhbHtCh3x2gg1EAQYCCABEgJbaPD_BwE
Though there does not seem to be an o-ring so I would be a bit wary.

quixoticgeek

  • Mostly Harmless
Re: Stove for a loner
« Reply #83 on: 28 February, 2021, 06:10:13 pm »
That one maybe. My one is similar but with a screw on lid so I carry fuel in it. Putting the lid on extinguishes it. Not titanium though. With yours you could drill a drainage hole in the bottom and fit a bung.

Yes, you have a trangia, or trangia clone. I explicitly said they can have fuel stored in them. Tho careful not to melt the o-ring by putting the lid on too soon...

But the Trangia is heavy 110g.

My stand* is 57g. The burner is 36g.

So the whole stove weighs less. Than just the trangia burner.

My whole set, including 500ml mug, is 167g:

https://www.ultralightoutdoorgear.co.uk/equipment-c3/stoves-c12/meths-stoves-c141/eca268r-titanium-pot-500-with-titanium-stove-p964

J


* https://www.ultralightoutdoorgear.co.uk/equipment-c3/stoves-c12/all-stoves-c145/eby257-titanium-dx-stand-for-alcohol-stove-p961
--
Beer, bikes, and backpacking
http://b.42q.eu/

Kim

  • Timelord
Re: Stove for a loner
« Reply #84 on: 28 February, 2021, 06:16:26 pm »
Yes, you have a trangia, or trangia clone. I explicitly said they can have fuel stored in them. Tho careful not to melt the o-ring by putting the lid on too soon...

That's not how you melt the o-ring.  (You're supposed to use the simmer ring with its flap closed to extinguish the burner, not the lid, and by the time it's cool enough to remove with bare fingers, the o-ring will be fine.)  You melt the o-ring by not noticing that the o-ring has stuck to the top of the burner rather than staying with the lid, and proceeding to light it.  Usually, but not always, in the dark.  You flick it off with a convenient implement, but by then it's too late...



The trick is to get spares from andrewc when he over-orders them, and stick one in the pocket of one of your touring panniers alongside the useful bit of string, tent/mat/pannier patching materials, dehydrated face cloths, Dunwich earwig and assortment of cable-ties.

Davef

Stove for a loner
« Reply #85 on: 28 February, 2021, 06:27:44 pm »
That one maybe. My one is similar but with a screw on lid so I carry fuel in it. Putting the lid on extinguishes it. Not titanium though. With yours you could drill a drainage hole in the bottom and fit a bung.

Yes, you have a trangia, or trangia clone. I explicitly said they can have fuel stored in them. Tho careful not to melt the o-ring by putting the lid on too soon...

But the Trangia is heavy 110g.

My stand* is 57g. The burner is 36g.

So the whole stove weighs less. Than just the trangia burner.

My whole set, including 500ml mug, is 167g:

https://www.ultralightoutdoorgear.co.uk/equipment-c3/stoves-c12/meths-stoves-c141/eca268r-titanium-pot-500-with-titanium-stove-p964

J


* https://www.ultralightoutdoorgear.co.uk/equipment-c3/stoves-c12/all-stoves-c145/eby257-titanium-dx-stand-for-alcohol-stove-p961
If we are getting competitive weight weeny wise, my mug, lid, burner/stand is 86g in total. Not weighed my heat shield. Then there is fuel weight - if you look at the first pic in post #10 you will see use of renewables ! I “cooked” 2 meals a day for a 7 days using only a total of 28g of fuel tabs broken into pieces combined with sticks (I was in a dry environment)

Zed43

  • prefers UK hills over Dutch mountains
Re: Stove for a loner
« Reply #86 on: 28 February, 2021, 07:29:27 pm »
For audax and biking in general that does not involve camping I wouldn't bother with a stove, but bring a 1 litre thermos (the Thermos brand is very good). No faff, and if you put plain hot water in also suitable to make yourself one of those cup-a-soups or another chemical concoction like instant noodles.

On the topic of meth stoves (which I agree are not the best option in your use-case), speedster stoves (UK based) uses carbon "felt" and a lid to preserve unburnt fuel.

Cudzoziemiec

  • Моя планета голубая, я люблю тебя и обнимаю
Re: Stove for a loner
« Reply #87 on: 28 February, 2021, 08:34:35 pm »
Was just about to mention Speedster stoves! This is the one I have: https://speedsterstoves.co.uk/alcohol/meths-burners/60ml-spll-proof-meths/alcohol-burrner.html Yes, you can just blow it out and the unburnt fuel can be tipped out if you really want, or just leave it in there with the lid screwed on.
Riding a bike through a city is like navigating the collective neural pathways of a vast global mind.

quixoticgeek

  • Mostly Harmless
Re: Stove for a loner
« Reply #88 on: 28 February, 2021, 08:36:14 pm »
Was just about to mention Speedster stoves! This is the one I have: https://speedsterstoves.co.uk/alcohol/meths-burners/60ml-spll-proof-meths/alcohol-burrner.html Yes, you can just blow it out and the unburnt fuel can be tipped out if you really want, or just leave it in there with the lid screwed on.

They are a clone of the original Zelph starlite stoves...

J
--
Beer, bikes, and backpacking
http://b.42q.eu/

Cudzoziemiec

  • Моя планета голубая, я люблю тебя и обнимаю
Re: Stove for a loner
« Reply #89 on: 28 February, 2021, 08:39:52 pm »
Looked that up. Yeah, it does look very similar, though the Speedster has a wider, separate pot stand.
http://www.woodgaz-stove.com/starlyte-stove.php
Riding a bike through a city is like navigating the collective neural pathways of a vast global mind.

quixoticgeek

  • Mostly Harmless
Re: Stove for a loner
« Reply #90 on: 28 February, 2021, 08:45:07 pm »
Looked that up. Yeah, it does look very similar, though the Speedster has a wider, separate pot stand.
http://www.woodgaz-stove.com/starlyte-stove.php

I have the version without the integral stand. I have a couple of speedster pot stands to use.

J
--
Beer, bikes, and backpacking
http://b.42q.eu/

Re: Stove for a loner
« Reply #91 on: 28 February, 2021, 09:15:30 pm »
I disagree that you cannot stop a meths or solid fuel burner once lit.

https://www.ultralightoutdoorgear.co.uk/equipment-c3/stoves-c12/meths-stoves-c141/eby254-titanium-alcohol-stove-p40

This is the burner I have. How do I pour the fuel back into the bottle if I only burnt half of it? Or how do I stop it leaking all over my pot when I put it back in there?

J

Back in the 80's when my first (and only ex) introduced me to Trangia stoves they had a screw-on cap with a seal ('O' ring). You took the seal out and used the cap to extinguish the stove; then you put the seal back in when the beast had cooled to stop the fuel leaking in transport. It worked too! Obviously progress has not been made in this respect in the intervening years!

My stove is a camping gaz one with those resealable canisters (cv471 I think) - but then I don't need to use it outside the camping gaz catchment area! If I had the money, the need and other decent excuses I would undoubtedly go for a multi-fuel stove of some type or other.

Davef

Re: Stove for a loner
« Reply #92 on: 28 February, 2021, 09:25:07 pm »
Oh, I forgot, I also have a varga that is a meths stove and you can flip it over and use a solid fuel tablet. I have owned it since may 2019 but not yet used it. It is a featherlight 24g including pot stand and fits inside my mug... as it was a lot smaller than it looked in the pictures so I expect left over unburnt meths won’t be an issue when I get round to trying it.

Re: Stove for a loner
« Reply #93 on: 02 March, 2021, 07:38:21 am »


What about esbit solid fuel stoves? Well they work. But they are messy. You can't turn them on/off, they leave a horrible residue, and they are slow. And you have to worry about the wind.

J
I guess you haven't used the modern replacement for esbit; the alcohol cube.
I've cooked with one on a couple of trips. Much, much better than an esbit. One cube cooks a meal. Half a cube is enough for hot drinks. Since it is just an alcohol gel, you can slice a cube up with a knife without contaminating the knife. The cubes are waterproof.

Several cubes will fit in the burner for transport.

Yes, a windshield is required - I've used heavy-duty Al foil, works ok.

They aren't quick compared to other options, but a lot, lot better than many. Simple, cheap, small and light.
<i>Marmite slave</i>

Re: Stove for a loner
« Reply #94 on: 02 March, 2021, 03:07:50 pm »
Have a Vargo woodburner stove very light, some twigs and tinder no need to carry fuel. Titanium and folds flat, best part is the built in windshield perfect for a metal cup.

Re: Stove for a loner
« Reply #95 on: 02 March, 2021, 03:58:02 pm »
As the coffee shops are only doing carryout and are usually mobbed if near exercise areas. Going to try this, saves looking for twigs. Conversion kit for alcohol fuel for the woodburner. https://vargooutdoors.com/converter-stove.html

Re: Stove for a loner
« Reply #96 on: 02 March, 2021, 04:06:15 pm »
For a high speed brew, the Brukit by Alpkit.
A great Jetboil type stove at a bargain price.
Welding, fabrication and light engineering available to forum members.

Re: what little stove?
« Reply #97 on: 04 March, 2021, 05:17:34 pm »
GAS CANISTER ADAPTERS: if you have been looking for hard to find gas canister adapters (for use with Campingaz Easy-Click, and puncture-type gas canisters) They are now available from the official importer here: https://mercatorgear.com/product-category/kovea-gas-canister-adapters/

MSR pocket rocket 2? prob only for heating water, or simple fry up, Triangia is too much bulk I think.  New to all this. ???   canister compatibiliity?

If you're looking for something small without a connecting house, I can highly recommend the Soto Amicus stove, I have the version without the built in piezo ignition (I didn't want it), but it's available with that, if preferred. It's surprisingly good

https://www.ultralightoutdoorgear.co.uk/equipment-c3/stoves-c12/all-stoves-c145/soto-amicus-stove-p7354

I actually use an MSR Wind Pro II most of the time, though, as generally prefer remote canister stoves, and it's still small enough to fit into my MSR Titan cookset:
https://www.msrgear.com/windpro-ii

Regarding canister compatibility in general, you can get adapters that let you use Camping Gaz blue cylinders on stoves with Coleman-type threads. The one for using threaded Camping Gaz cyclinders is relatively small (e.g. https://www.alpinetrek.co.uk/edelrid-ventilkartuschen-adapter/ ), the one for using the pierce-able non-threaded cylinders is much larger and heavier and must stay attached to the gas cylinder until it's empty (https://www.ultralightoutdoorgear.co.uk/equipment-c3/stoves-c12/stove-accessories-c132/puncture-cartridge-adaptor-p390 - looks like this one is discontinued, though).

Re: Stove for a loner
« Reply #98 on: 06 March, 2021, 08:21:59 pm »
I've been known to pack a Trangia and kettle; not exactly lightweight, but stable and easy to use, and it's not like my Carradice is short of space.

I just bought a Wild Stoves Woodgas stove; packed in an MSR stainless pot it's probably marginally smaller than the Trangia and of similar weight, so that may come with me in future if I'm heading to the woods...

Re: Stove for a loner
« Reply #99 on: 07 March, 2021, 10:30:32 am »
For a high speed brew, the Brukit by Alpkit.
A great Jetboil type stove at a bargain price.
Just bought one of these.
Never knowingly under caffeinated