Author Topic: this camping malarky...  (Read 4411 times)

Cudzoziemiec

  • Моя планета голубая, я люблю тебя и обнимаю
Re: this camping malarky...
« Reply #25 on: 18 June, 2021, 08:58:02 am »
Something inflatable might work nicely, but would blow the budget.
Boom... tish.

I note that Alpkit now do an inflatable tent aimed at bikepackers. The idea being no poles makes it easier to stuff into an oddly shaped bikepacking bag, as well as (perhaps) saving weight.

Riding a bike through a city is like navigating the collective neural pathways of a vast global mind.

velosam

  • '.....you used to be an apple on a stick.'
Re: this camping malarky...
« Reply #26 on: 18 June, 2021, 09:23:53 am »
Proof of the pudding is in the eating, so hopefully will do a couple of car camps and then shift to motorcycle camping. However similar to a bicycle I dont want to carry much stuff, so lets see how I do. Lots of food for thought, cheers

citoyen

  • Occasionally rides a bike
Re: this camping malarky...
« Reply #27 on: 18 June, 2021, 09:24:21 am »
The down side of car camping is that it's too tempting to just load up the car with *everything*. But then you're likely to end up with *too much* stuff - bearing in mind you will have limited storage space, and that keeping everything clean is much harder.

Part of the joy of camping is roughing it a bit. If that means wearing the same pair of pants and socks two days running, so be it. That's preferable to having to take a load of laundry home with you. Minimise things like kitchen utensils - take only versatile tools that can be used for multiple purposes, don't try to set up a whole field kitchen.

On the other hand, taking the car means you can afford to pack extras like wind breaks, which can be extremely useful - especially if the campsite is in an exposed location. Also good for a bit of extra privacy on busy sites.
"The future's all yours, you lousy bicycles."

citoyen

  • Occasionally rides a bike
Re: this camping malarky...
« Reply #28 on: 18 June, 2021, 09:32:20 am »
I note that Alpkit now do an inflatable tent aimed at bikepackers. The idea being no poles makes it easier to stuff into an oddly shaped bikepacking bag, as well as (perhaps) saving weight.

I can't help being suspicious of inflatable tents - just struggle to accept the idea that they would be rigid enough. But they seem popular, so I'm sure they're fine - especially for a one/two-person size. Although I have seen some massive family-size inflatable tents too.
"The future's all yours, you lousy bicycles."

Re: this camping malarky...
« Reply #29 on: 18 June, 2021, 09:40:05 am »
Something inflatable might work nicely, but would blow the budget.
Boom... tish.

I note that Alpkit now do an inflatable tent aimed at bikepackers. The idea being no poles makes it easier to stuff into an oddly shaped bikepacking bag, as well as (perhaps) saving weight.

I have a tent with an inflatable “air” beam which basically replaces the main pole that forms a hoop in many tents. Kim is right, not cheap.  But it is light (920g including all the pegs and guy lines) and packs into compact compression stuff sack.   The rear you are mean to find a twig for a pole.  But I’ve never bothered as under tension my feet down that end are fine. Comes with a small hand pump which doesn’t take long to inflate the beam.  But it’s not a tent for sitting up in. If weather looks like it’s going to be very wet I prefer my three man tunnel tent which has plenty of volume for the weight.

Cudzoziemiec

  • Моя планета голубая, я люблю тебя и обнимаю
Re: this camping malarky...
« Reply #30 on: 18 June, 2021, 09:43:10 am »
Yes, the "air beam" principle is what Alpkit are working on. I've never looked at the festival pop-up tents, do they work in a similar way or does the whole tent inflate like a balloon?
Riding a bike through a city is like navigating the collective neural pathways of a vast global mind.

Re: this camping malarky...
« Reply #31 on: 18 June, 2021, 09:56:19 am »
I note that Alpkit now do an inflatable tent aimed at bikepackers. The idea being no poles makes it easier to stuff into an oddly shaped bikepacking bag, as well as (perhaps) saving weight.

I can't help being suspicious of inflatable tents - just struggle to accept the idea that they would be rigid enough. But they seem popular, so I'm sure they're fine - especially for a one/two-person size. Although I have seen some massive family-size inflatable tents too.

I was on a site the other year and the family were trying to find a nearby shop to purchase a new tent.  There aren't many places near the Lizard...

It seems that a mouse had visited the tent when it was in storage, and so it wouldn't inflate when they got there after a long drive.

mcshroom

  • Mushroom
Re: this camping malarky...
« Reply #32 on: 18 June, 2021, 09:59:40 am »
Definitely start with a campsite. Also try and pick a dry night if possible, and for your first attempt a relatively warm one. If you have a back garden you can camp in, that might be even better for testing kit.

If you are away from home, a method of making hot water for tea/coffee is something I like. I'm usually happy to eat cold foods when camping, as long as I can get a hot drink. This also saves washing up over cooking, especially if you are used to doing things like frying bacon as per most camps I did as a scout.

Another tip I'd give is that roll mats and self inflating mats may be tiny and cheap, but unless the ground is soft you may not enjoy sleeping on them. I was always happy with them when I was younger, but I use a syn-mat now (if I ever get round to camping - it's been a while :-[). Cheaper and at least as good if you are car camping would be a blow up airbed.

With poles, I've found that alloy poles are far easier to put up than fibreglass ones, as they form a smooth pole when fitted together. The annoying bit of feeding a fibreglass pole through a tent tends to be the metal connectors snagging on the material IME. On the plus side, fibreglass poles are easier to repair if the campsite dog decides to jump on your tent and smash them. Alloy poles take a bit of inginuity to keep going ;D
Climbs like a sprinter, sprints like a climber!

citoyen

  • Occasionally rides a bike
Re: this camping malarky...
« Reply #33 on: 18 June, 2021, 10:13:42 am »
I've never looked at the festival pop-up tents, do they work in a similar way or does the whole tent inflate like a balloon?

No, they have flexible poles that stay in place, arranged in a continuous circle (makes a sort of Pringle outline shape when erected) - to put it away, you have to contort the poles into something like a figure of eight, then fold it in on itself. It has straps to keep it folded. We have one, which was a gift from a relative for the boy when he was small. We have taken it with us on family camping holidays to give him a bit of independence, in the form of his own private sleeping area, while we occupy the main tent. There is a knack to folding it up but I've never acquired it, so it's a learning process every time. Hateful thing.
"The future's all yours, you lousy bicycles."

citoyen

  • Occasionally rides a bike
Re: this camping malarky...
« Reply #34 on: 18 June, 2021, 10:14:07 am »
It seems that a mouse had visited the tent when it was in storage, and so it wouldn't inflate when they got there after a long drive.

 :facepalm:
"The future's all yours, you lousy bicycles."

Re: this camping malarky...
« Reply #35 on: 18 June, 2021, 10:23:16 am »
Yes, the "air beam" principle is what Alpkit are working on. I've never looked at the festival pop-up tents, do they work in a similar way or does the whole tent inflate like a balloon?

Where you would normally have the pole sleeve. There’s a double layered sealed chamber with a valve. The hand pump clicks into place, and you pump till you have a solid hoop formed by the beam. You then twist the valve to seal it and release pump. I’ve had the tent about 8 years now.  It does work pretty well.

It’s nothing like a festival tent.

Regulator

  • That's Councillor Regulator to you...
Re: this camping malarky...
« Reply #36 on: 18 June, 2021, 10:24:50 am »
Something inflatable might work nicely, but would blow the budget.
Boom... tish.

I note that Alpkit now do an inflatable tent aimed at bikepackers. The idea being no poles makes it easier to stuff into an oddly shaped bikepacking bag, as well as (perhaps) saving weight.


Git!

*Soon to be owner of a new Polestar tent*
Quote from: clarion
I completely agree with Reg.

Green Party Councillor

Re: this camping malarky...
« Reply #37 on: 18 June, 2021, 10:26:40 am »
I note that Alpkit now do an inflatable tent aimed at bikepackers. The idea being no poles makes it easier to stuff into an oddly shaped bikepacking bag, as well as (perhaps) saving weight.

I can't help being suspicious of inflatable tents - just struggle to accept the idea that they would be rigid enough. But they seem popular, so I'm sure they're fine - especially for a one/two-person size. Although I have seen some massive family-size inflatable tents too.

I was on a site the other year and the family were trying to find a nearby shop to purchase a new tent.  There aren't many places near the Lizard...

It seems that a mouse had visited the tent when it was in storage, and so it wouldn't inflate when they got there after a long drive.

They’d be able to repair with the patch kits you get for air beds.  Assuming the hole is obvious and not super large.

Cudzoziemiec

  • Моя планета голубая, я люблю тебя и обнимаю
Re: this camping malarky...
« Reply #38 on: 18 June, 2021, 12:32:14 pm »
Definitely start with a campsite. Also try and pick a dry night if possible, and for your first attempt a relatively warm one. If you have a back garden you can camp in, that might be even better for testing kit.
Garden camping can be surprisingly fun, especially if you have kids. Make it as rough or as civilized as you want, it's an adventure without travel – moving your point of view rather than the view. And it's definitely a good way to try out new kit!
Riding a bike through a city is like navigating the collective neural pathways of a vast global mind.

Re: this camping malarky...
« Reply #39 on: 18 June, 2021, 12:53:46 pm »
Definitely start with a campsite. Also try and pick a dry night if possible, and for your first attempt a relatively warm one. If you have a back garden you can camp in, that might be even better for testing kit.
Garden camping can be surprisingly fun, especially if you have kids. Make it as rough or as civilized as you want, it's an adventure without travel – moving your point of view rather than the view. And it's definitely a good way to try out new kit!

Don't try this if you have cats and an expensive tent though - our Hilleberg has never been the same since Anja discovered it was a fun thing to climb up and down the other side. Then there was the fun part of grabbing feet through the inner having crawled in under the outer. We locked her in the house in the end which had an element of irony to it
Duct tape is magic and should be worshipped

Re: this camping malarky...
« Reply #40 on: 18 June, 2021, 12:59:23 pm »
Any tent that is pitched inner first, and then an outer over the top, has never heard of rain. An inner first pitching tent is a place of misery when you put it up only to find your shelter is soaking wet before you've even climbed into it...
I've heard of rain, camped in plenty of it and still have a preference for inner first pitching. 

We have the Alpkit Jaran as our backpacking tent. It's pitch inner first. Inner first tend to be lighter - although not always the case but I found you have to spend more. We use the Hilleberg nallo for bike trips which is outer first and lovely but a bit big for the rucksacks.

In the pouring rain last week we were able to erect the tent fully in the washing up area of the campsite and carry it to the pitch for pegging out. Not always possible especially when wild camping but there's usually some solution - camping is about being self sufficient. I'm pretty sure (not tested yet) the poles could be erected and the outer thrown over and clipped in without the inner at least to provide a shelter for the rain to ease for a full assembly later.

I wouldn't entirely rule out inner first pitching if other features and budget dictated that was the best compromise. All kit selection is a compromise.
Duct tape is magic and should be worshipped

Re: this camping malarky...
« Reply #41 on: 18 June, 2021, 01:01:38 pm »
The OP has missed out asking the most important question; Shimano or Campag?
<i>Marmite slave</i>

Re: this camping malarky...
« Reply #42 on: 18 June, 2021, 02:47:21 pm »

Btw, this is the tent I use:



J

It’s invisible to me, until I “quote” your post. The text that is. I still don’t see the pic.
We are making a New World (Paul Nash, 1918)

citoyen

  • Occasionally rides a bike
Re: this camping malarky...
« Reply #43 on: 18 June, 2021, 03:02:43 pm »
It’s invisible to me, until I “quote” your post. The text that is. I still don’t see the pic.

The emperor's new tent!

(I didn't see the pic either, but assumed QG was making a point...  ;D )
"The future's all yours, you lousy bicycles."

Re: this camping malarky...
« Reply #44 on: 18 June, 2021, 03:19:13 pm »
Stealth camping

quixoticgeek

  • Mostly Harmless
Re: this camping malarky...
« Reply #45 on: 18 June, 2021, 03:35:10 pm »

Btw, this is the tent I use:

https://www.backpackinglight.co.uk/shelters-1/WF129-138.html

J

Oops, link now fixed. I used img rather than url tags. I'm awake, honest.

J
--
Beer, bikes, and backpacking
http://b.42q.eu/


Re: this camping malarky...
« Reply #47 on: 18 June, 2021, 03:59:05 pm »
That's a clone of the Golite Shangri-La 3 which I still have & use.  I got a 3/4 size inner for it from AliExpress a while ago. 


https://www.aliexpress.com/item/3F-high-quality-T-door-design-2-person-4-seasons-230-132-138cm-inner-tent-40d/32973615138.html?spm=a2g0s.9042311.0.0.17434c4dRH7Vyj


I use my MSR HubbaHubba more frequently though, probably time I had a cull.
Not fast & rarely furious

tweeting occasional in(s)anities as andrewxclark

Re: this camping malarky...
« Reply #48 on: 19 June, 2021, 02:21:25 pm »
I'd start with a campsite and borrowed, someone else's or just cheapish gear. Definitely practice putting the tent up in the garden or park first, or make sure your friend has done so. Check the weather forecast and go for one night or a weekend. Eat in the pub but it is nice to be able to make hot drinks (well, it depends on your attitude to tea and coffee). Car camping probably easier on grounds of making it possible to use cheap rectangular sleeping bags, which are heavy, bulky and warm, cozy mats and stuff, and take lots of food with you if you want – although I've never actually car camped so might be 101% wrong on this.

This sounds about right. Just be careful or you'll end up like a lot of us with camping kit for every occaision. I have everything required for the range of family car camping to solo wild camping and I'm sure I'm still a sucker for the latest best bit of kit.....
Reine de la Fauche


Speshact

  • Charlie
Re: this camping malarky...
« Reply #49 on: 19 June, 2021, 08:08:57 pm »
Has anyone eulogised about packing a hot water bottle yet?