Author Topic: Science for toddlers  (Read 1851 times)

Kim

  • Timelord
Re: Science for toddlers
« Reply #25 on: 19 October, 2021, 05:04:52 pm »
The difference between smoke, mist, and dust in the air might be worth exploring at some point. It's something I remember being puzzling for smalls.

Also, flammable liquids.  I remember finding the concept extremely counter-intuitive, because surely liquids are wet and obviously wet things can't burn.

(This was exacerbated by my only experience of flammable liquid being petril, which occupies a sort of Jesus-like state, where people tell you that it's very important but you've never actually seen it, as it's always contained in frustratingly-opaque things like pumps and hoses and cars where anything could be happening.)

Re: Science for toddlers
« Reply #26 on: 19 October, 2021, 05:09:05 pm »
Static electricity - balloons and woolen jumpers, sparks, hair standing on end.
Experiments 94 - 113 in that link upthread - https://www.arvindguptatoys.com/arvindgupta/bookofexpts.pdf
Rust never sleeps

Kim

  • Timelord
Re: Science for toddlers
« Reply #27 on: 19 October, 2021, 05:10:24 pm »
Additive and subtractive colour mixing would be good preparation for teachers being wrong at them in primary school.

Getting additive colour mixing to actually work requires some properly balanced sources, though.  You can't just shine a torch through bits of carrier bag and sweet wrappers and expect to get anything that could pass for white.  I don't think I actually really believed in it until I saw it done with proper gelled spotlights at some SCIENCE museum or other.

Of course, decent LEDs have been invented since then...

Re: Science for toddlers
« Reply #28 on: 19 October, 2021, 05:14:28 pm »
>>I remember << finding the concept extremely counter-intuitive, because surely liquids are wet and obviously wet things can't burn.


I suspect this is key. It's easy to forget that the just-3 year old being has a tenuous connection to humanity at best, and you thankfully remember very little from this age (although it would appear to be the start of long term memory)

Kim

  • Timelord
Re: Science for toddlers
« Reply #29 on: 19 October, 2021, 05:16:47 pm »
I remember many things from that age (well, probably nearer 4), but it's helped by having moved to a different country a short time later and therefore being able to date the memories with some degree of accuracy.

I know some people don't seem to remember much of anything from before they were a teenager.  Weird.

hellymedic

  • Just do it!
Re: Science for toddlers
« Reply #30 on: 19 October, 2021, 05:21:08 pm »
Additive and subtractive colour mixing would be good preparation for teachers being wrong at them in primary school.
Getting additive colour mixing to actually work requires some properly balanced sources, though.  You can't just shine a torch through bits of carrier bag and sweet wrappers and expect to get anything that could pass for white.  I don't think I actually really believed in it until I saw it done with proper gelled spotlights at some SCIENCE museum or other.
Of course, decent LEDs have been invented since then...

For paints, please supply some decent magenta, so that 'red + blue -> purple' isn't a LIE I could never understand.
Scarlet + blue will always make a horrid brown mush.
Play-Doh comes in nice clear colours if you don't want paint.

hellymedic

  • Just do it!
Re: Science for toddlers
« Reply #31 on: 19 October, 2021, 05:32:06 pm »
>>I remember << finding the concept extremely counter-intuitive, because surely liquids are wet and obviously wet things can't burn.
I suspect this is key. It's easy to forget that the just-3 year old being has a tenuous connection to humanity at best, and you thankfully remember very little from this age (although it would appear to be the start of long term memory)

NEVER underestimate what a Small Child might remember!
Kid Brother (then 38 months) & I were returning from pharmacy, where we'd bought a new dummy, one December evening. I pointed out a parked car with illuminated lamps.
'Oh dear, the batteries will get flat and they won't be able to thtart the car!' piped little, lisping voice.

Turned out Dad's return from work for family supper TEN MONTHS previously had been delayed for this reason. This would have been before he could speak in full sentences.

Cudzoziemiec

  • Моя планета голубая, я люблю тебя и обнимаю
Re: Science for toddlers
« Reply #32 on: 19 October, 2021, 06:20:35 pm »
I've just asked my son about his earliest memories. He remembers drawing stripes of colour on the side of the washing machine. He was under two when he did this (I have a photo somewhere).

I'm unsure of what you mean by "tenuous connection to humanity"?
Riding a bike through a city is like navigating the collective neural pathways of a vast global mind.

Re: Science for toddlers
« Reply #33 on: 19 October, 2021, 07:27:32 pm »
Additive and subtractive colour mixing would be good preparation for teachers being wrong at them in primary school.

Getting additive colour mixing to actually work requires some properly balanced sources, though.  You can't just shine a torch through bits of carrier bag and sweet wrappers and expect to get anything that could pass for white.  I don't think I actually really believed in it until I saw it done with proper gelled spotlights at some SCIENCE museum or other.

Of course, decent LEDs have been invented since then...

Our head of physics wanted me to make variac power supplies for the slide projectors we used for colour mixing to balance up the filters to make a good white...

...I suggested "why don't we move this one a bit closer, and that one a bit further away..."  ;)
If it ain't broke, fix it 'til it is...

Re: Science for toddlers
« Reply #34 on: 19 October, 2021, 07:34:51 pm »
You can make a battery from copper and a lemon, can you not?

You need 2 different metals with different electropotentials, and potatoes work at least as well as lemons. Gavanised (zinc) nails and copper (plated) 1p coins pushed into a potato - connect 3 or 4 of these potato 'cells' together in series with wires and you should be able get an LED to illuminate.
If it ain't broke, fix it 'til it is...

Re: Science for toddlers
« Reply #35 on: 19 October, 2021, 07:39:26 pm »
Well, the first attempt - seeing what floats and sinks - was a resounding hit with the littl'un - the video needs a lot more work, it was very hastily cobbled together.

The next session I think can be "chemicals". Or, aka, mixing stuff together.

Flour and water into paste is an obvious one
Bicarb and vinegar for the lols
Yeast and sugar in a bottle with a balloon over it
Cleaning copper with lemon
Cleaning limescale out the kettle

Any other domestic things to suggest? colour changing stuff?

Colour changing - red cabbage indicator with different household 'chemicals'.
Chromatography trolls - (I can send you the worksheet)

Other houshold chemistry - separating substances - a mixture of salt and pepper can be separated with a electrostacically charged balloon, or by dissolving the salt, filtering and recrystalising.
If it ain't broke, fix it 'til it is...

Re: Science for toddlers
« Reply #36 on: 19 October, 2021, 07:49:26 pm »
>>I remember << finding the concept extremely counter-intuitive, because surely liquids are wet and obviously wet things can't burn.
I suspect this is key. It's easy to forget that the just-3 year old being has a tenuous connection to humanity at best, and you thankfully remember very little from this age (although it would appear to be the start of long term memory)

NEVER underestimate what a Small Child might remember!
Kid Brother (then 38 months) & I were returning from pharmacy, where we'd bought a new dummy, one December evening. I pointed out a parked car with illuminated lamps.
'Oh dear, the batteries will get flat and they won't be able to thtart the car!' piped little, lisping voice.

Turned out Dad's return from work for family supper TEN MONTHS previously had been delayed for this reason. This would have been before he could speak in full sentences.

My bold
I second this.
To this day I can recite the Greek alphabet as was taught to me by the man pretending to be my grandfather (don't ask - it's complicated) when I was aged three or four.

ETA - He also took me to Victoria Station to see the last steam locomotives going in and out of there.

ETFA - He was a magistrate and pre WWII ran the railway system in Warsaw.

hellymedic

  • Just do it!
Re: Science for toddlers
« Reply #37 on: 19 October, 2021, 08:30:29 pm »
I remember many things from that age (well, probably nearer 4), but it's helped by having moved to a different country a short time later and therefore being able to date the memories with some degree of accuracy.
I know some people don't seem to remember much of anything from before they were a teenager.  Weird.

I have clear memories of Aunt Florrie.

Florrie was mown down by a drunk driver in May 1961 and subsequently died.

That was the month before my third birthday.

Kim

  • Timelord
Re: Science for toddlers
« Reply #38 on: 19 October, 2021, 09:39:50 pm »
My earliest verifiable memory is of meeting my brother for the first time in his foster parents' living room.  I never saw it in a photograph, but I remember the curtains vividly.  (Babies, OTOH, are basically interchangeable.)  I'd have been maybe two and a half.

I also have memories of learning words in the muddled-up order that small children often process language: I asked my dad what some interesting piece of apparatus in one of the rooms at the MRC compound was, and him saying it was a 'headover projector'.  I knew what a projector was (we had one for 8mm cine film), and concluded the lens-onna-stick was so that people's heads wouldn't get in the way of the beam.

More difficult to date (probably aged 4 or 5) was a frustrating conversation I had with my mother about "the flying thing on the wall sometimes".  She gave several unsatisfactory missing-the-point answers before changing the subject.  It was only years later that I understood that she couldn't see what I was talking about because it was a floater in my eye.

rr

Re: Science for toddlers
« Reply #39 on: 19 October, 2021, 11:59:21 pm »
Well, the first attempt - seeing what floats and sinks - was a resounding hit with the littl'un - the video needs a lot more work, it was very hastily cobbled together.

The next session I think can be "chemicals". Or, aka, mixing stuff together.

Flour and water into paste is an obvious one
Bicarb and vinegar for the lols
Yeast and sugar in a bottle with a balloon over it
Cleaning copper with lemon
Cleaning limescale out the kettle

Any other domestic things to suggest? colour changing stuff?

Colour changing - red cabbage indicator with different household 'chemicals'.
Chromatography trolls - (I can send you the worksheet)

Other houshold chemistry - separating substances - a mixture of salt and pepper can be separated with a electrostacically charged balloon, or by dissolving the salt, filtering and recrystalising.
Beat you to the cabbage
https://www.facebook.com/520602600/posts/10154029635407601/
Partitioning the red colour in tomato sauce between oil and water is also interesting.

Sent from my motorola edge 20 using Tapatalk


hellymedic

  • Just do it!
Re: Science for toddlers
« Reply #40 on: 20 October, 2021, 12:24:23 am »
I thought I posted about cabbage a while back...

Re: Science for toddlers
« Reply #41 on: 20 October, 2021, 10:42:12 am »
I think we all have isolated memories from that age, for many years I remembered what felt like a lot. But, those memories are filtered and internally reinforced, I don't think they operate in quite the same way as they do when you get older and

I'm unsure of what you mean by "tenuous connection to humanity"?

That is all about the way a three year old relates to the world, at a time when they are learning the conventions and mannerisms that more grown up children and adults understand, I'm noticing this far more as a Grandparent. What you think they think or will think in reaction to any given situation is only an approximation.

Tim Hall

  • Victoria is my queen
Re: Science for toddlers
« Reply #42 on: 20 October, 2021, 10:47:56 am »
Additive and subtractive colour mixing would be good preparation for teachers being wrong at them in primary school.

Getting additive colour mixing to actually work requires some properly balanced sources, though.  You can't just shine a torch through bits of carrier bag and sweet wrappers and expect to get anything that could pass for white.  I don't think I actually really believed in it until I saw it done with proper gelled spotlights at some SCIENCE museum or other.

Of course, decent LEDs have been invented since then...

Our head of physics wanted me to make variac power supplies for the slide projectors we used for colour mixing to balance up the filters to make a good white...

...I suggested "why don't we move this one a bit closer, and that one a bit further away..."  ;)
Was that at Craggy Island High School?
There are two ways you can get exercise out of a bicycle: you can
"overhaul" it, or you can ride it.  (Jerome K Jerome)

Kim

  • Timelord
Re: Science for toddlers
« Reply #43 on: 20 October, 2021, 11:41:34 am »
And just to avoid prior art, How burny is your breakfast? has already been done: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2Jr-9MzOq3k

Re: Science for toddlers
« Reply #44 on: 22 October, 2021, 06:08:21 pm »
Yesterday's 'speriment was jelly, dissolving and setting. Most well recieved, would you believe.

Re: Science for toddlers
« Reply #45 on: 22 October, 2021, 06:16:29 pm »
Yesterday's 'speriment was jelly, dissolving and setting. Most well recieved, would you believe.
And afterwards, you can eat it!  :thumbsup:

Pingu

  • Put away those fiery biscuits!
  • Mrs Pingu's domestique
    • the Igloo
Re: Science for toddlers
« Reply #46 on: 22 October, 2021, 06:37:06 pm »
How about the effects of beetroot and asparagus?

Re: Science for toddlers
« Reply #47 on: 22 October, 2021, 07:42:14 pm »
Yesterday's 'speriment was jelly, dissolving and setting. Most well recieved, would you believe.
And afterwards, you can eat it!  :thumbsup:

Our in the true spirit of experiment, some before and some afterwards. I'm not sure he made too many tasting notes, though. He is, however, 100% sold on the "experimenting" shtick, which he wasn't to start with.

How about the effects of beetroot and asparagus?


Were you volunteering to get him to eat either?

Mr Larrington

  • A bit ov a lyv wyr by slof standirds
  • Custard Wallah
    • Mr Larrington's Automatic Diary
Re: Science for toddlers
« Reply #48 on: 22 October, 2021, 08:11:53 pm »
How about the effects of beetroot and asparagus?

If swallowed (do not) induce vomiting?
External Transparent Wall Inspection Operative & Mayor of Mortagne-au-Perche
Satisfying the Bloodlust of the Masses in Peacetime

Pingu

  • Put away those fiery biscuits!
  • Mrs Pingu's domestique
    • the Igloo
Re: Science for toddlers
« Reply #49 on: 22 October, 2021, 11:35:27 pm »

How about the effects of beetroot and asparagus?


Were you volunteering to get him to eat either?

Funnel?

NB: I am not a parent.