Author Topic: Steve's Kit  (Read 26369 times)

Re: Steve's Kit
« Reply #225 on: July 14, 2015, 07:24:40 pm »
a rack and mudguards can be fitted no problem

Re: Steve's Kit
« Reply #226 on: July 15, 2015, 08:49:52 am »
I believe that during the planning Steve did try a carbon speed machine. I reckon he's weighed up <sic> light/fast frame vs comfort and decided that comfort wins.
<i>Marmite slave</i>

Re: Steve's Kit
« Reply #227 on: July 15, 2015, 09:41:11 am »
I believe that during the planning Steve did try a carbon speed machine. I reckon he's weighed up <sic> light/fast frame vs comfort and decided that comfort wins.
I reckon you are right there, however why not have the faster lighter bike to use on good days, when the weather is just right and Steve could really take advantage of say some aero components to eek out some additional miles and go back to old faithful the following day to recover.

Edit: It has just occurred to me that Kurt has been using aero wheels the whole time, so a pair of aero wheels (disc) could be used to not only gain a few miles but also use less energy for the same distance.
Eddington Number 75

Re: Steve's Kit
« Reply #228 on: July 15, 2015, 10:39:54 am »
Something I've wondered is a) the 'usual' weight of Steve's carradice rack pack, and b) the difference in the weight of said rack pack when he's doing, say, a Fens loop out from home and back, compared to when he's staying with a host for the night.  I suppose, how much the amount of kit Steve is carrying day to day varies..?
"an inordinate fondness for beetles"

Re: Steve's Kit
« Reply #229 on: July 15, 2015, 11:17:06 am »
Is someone keeping notes on the performance of the kit over time?
'Absence of evidence is not evidence of absence'.

Martin John Rees.

Re: Steve's Kit
« Reply #230 on: July 15, 2015, 03:43:29 pm »
I believe that during the planning Steve did try a carbon speed machine. I reckon he's weighed up <sic> light/fast frame vs comfort and decided that comfort wins.

I seem to recall reading that given he's mostly riding on the flat in his view the benefit of a lighter bike is offset by the greater strength/reliability/fixability of a steel job. Once he's rolling the weight penalty is minimal.
9 miles SW of Marsh Gibbon

redfalo

  • known as Olaf in the real world
    • The Fridays
Re: Steve's Kit
« Reply #231 on: July 16, 2015, 04:43:41 pm »
I believe that during the planning Steve did try a carbon speed machine. I reckon he's weighed up <sic> light/fast frame vs comfort and decided that comfort wins.

I seem to recall reading that given he's mostly riding on the flat in his view the benefit of a lighter bike is offset by the greater strength/reliability/fixability of a steel job. Once he's rolling the weight penalty is minimal.

yes, I recall this too. However, if you compare Steve's and Kurt's total climbing on Strava, Steve is doing many more hills than Kurt on a heavier bike.

Who am I to comment on  Steve' bike choice - he will have spent months over months contemplating his choice. But for me,  a lighter bike has made a big difference, even when not climbing up the Alps.

I changed from a Moulton TSR 30 to a Specialised Roubaix carbon frame a year ago for long distance rides, and my average speed went ob 2kph instantly. When I did a 400 on the Moulton in April, I was really suffering. Thanks to a professional bike fit, I do have not comfort issues whatsoever on the road bike.

red marley

Re: Steve's Kit
« Reply #232 on: July 16, 2015, 05:03:09 pm »
Reliability may well be more important to Steve than it is to Kurt. As Kurt has motorised support, a mechanical from a more fragile but lighter bike can be dealt with by swapping bikes with a backup on the van (as he has done on many occasions this year). If Steve has a mechanical 200km from home it will be more difficult to sort out without losing lots of time.

Re: Steve's Kit
« Reply #233 on: July 16, 2015, 10:33:22 pm »
ultra-light bikes aside i can't see how a lighter bike is less reliable. if we were talking about the resistance to angle grinder attack, then probably yes. but for normal steady riding that Steve is doing? i would definitely use a lighter bike; even 3-5km extra per day (in reality closer to 10k, imo) he could ride with a better bike could "buy" him four-five days by the end of year - for no extra effort!!
i'm aware and sure that Steve has thought it through and chose his bikes and luggage that seemed most suitable for the job. however, i can't sit still thinking that he's reluctant to use some of easily available advantages - this challenge is such a massive commitment - why not do it full on?..

Re: Steve's Kit
« Reply #234 on: July 17, 2015, 03:44:11 pm »
Is there a lighter carbon framed bike with similar frame geometry to the Sojourn??
<i>Marmite slave</i>

Karla

  • car(e) free
Re: Steve's Kit
« Reply #235 on: July 17, 2015, 03:54:22 pm »
There will be somewhere, without a doubt.  Probably a Spesh Roubaix or one of the other range of 'endurance bikes' that have come along to give touring geometry with racing looks.
Latest tour journal: Bucharest to Berlin

Re: Steve's Kit
« Reply #236 on: July 22, 2015, 09:29:30 pm »
Agree completely re lighter bike.  My friend, who is a Raleigh dealer, was also very surprised when he heard which bike Steve was going to use. 

The other thing about Steve's bike setup that could be massively improved is his aerodynamics.  Granted he is not going at high speeds most of the time (although he will spend a lot of time in a year going down hills and it will add up), but he looks like he is very high and pushing an awful lot of air, compared to, say, Kurt.  So he needs to use more energy to get the same speed. or ride longer to get the same distance. 

You can't just change your position overnight, you need to get used to it, so it's not a quick fix.  But Steve does have all year, and I am convinced there would be big gains to be had if he worked at it. 

Re: Steve's Kit
« Reply #237 on: July 23, 2015, 09:01:43 am »
But will he find a sponsor to provide 3 x carbon bikes (or even one for "fine days" use), if indeed he wanted to ride one?  Or else the support team would need to finance the purchase?
We are making a New World (Paul Nash, 1918)

red marley

Re: Steve's Kit
« Reply #238 on: July 23, 2015, 09:06:22 am »
Let's not forget that a main motivation for Steve's attempt at the OYTT was his admiration for Tommy's 1939 record. The sponsorship of both by Raleigh provides a nice symmetry.

Re: Steve's Kit
« Reply #239 on: July 23, 2015, 09:32:05 am »
Let me ask.
If you were attempting the HAM’R, and a bike company agreed to supply the bikes to your liking, would you refuse?

Mouth, gift horse.

TimC

  • Bike pilot
Re: Steve's Kit
« Reply #240 on: July 23, 2015, 11:52:51 am »
Let's not forget that a main motivation for Steve's attempt at the OYTT was his admiration for Tommy's 1939 record. The sponsorship of both by Raleigh provides a nice symmetry.

Raleigh do some very, very nice carbon bikes these days! Just sayin' ;D

tiermat

  • According to Jane, I'm a Unisex SpaceAdmin
Re: Steve's Kit
« Reply #241 on: July 23, 2015, 12:18:09 pm »
Indeed, the new Roker, in carbon does look lovely.  Shame about the spec, though...
I feel like Captain Kirk, on a brand new planet every day, a little like King Kong on top of the Empire State

Bobby

  • Previously called "Can't Climb"
Re: Steve's Kit
« Reply #242 on: July 29, 2015, 04:38:15 pm »
Steves Milltag kit looks nice, but has he really been riding with long legs/arms every day?  surely even with long days in the saddle July is the time for warmer/lighter clothing ???

Re: Steve's Kit
« Reply #243 on: September 28, 2015, 02:43:44 pm »
Can we bump this to the status of a sticky, please?
<i>Marmite slave</i>

Re: Steve's Kit
« Reply #244 on: September 29, 2015, 12:03:55 am »
I have no doubt that Steve has agonised long and hard, both before and during his current rides, over kit and clothing.

However a lot of this is very personal, and I would not suggest for a moment that Steve is wrong in any way. He could change a lot of things easily if he so wished, but I think he is doing just fine. He rides differently to Kurt, but I do think that Steve's steady repetitive rhythm obviously suits him best rather than upping the speed at the expense of something else.

If I were in his shoes (but never will be) I would do everything my way, in the way that felt most comfortable to me. Its not a race in the traditional sense and reliability and consistency are the key.

I dare say that if Steve had someone following/supporting like Alicia does, then there would be scope for change, but that simply isn't the case.

(Incidentally I find my 531c frame and the well worn Brooks much more comfortable and satisfying than using my Carbon Fibre framed bike on longer runs, so I am definitely in the TG camp here).

crowriver

  • Крис Б
Re: Steve's Kit
« Reply #245 on: September 29, 2015, 11:04:01 am »
Nothing but respect from me for Steve's efforts.

As a self confessed fan of steel framed bikes, I have to agree with his choice of frame too. The Sojourn's 631 butted steel and relaxed touring geometry will help soak up road shock and vibration better than any carbon or (shudder) alloy steed. I suppose he could have gone for Titanium but it's his choice and steel is tried and tested over decades, centuries even for bicycle frames.

I wouldn't mind a Raleigh Sojourn myself for a touring rig...
Embrace your inner Fred.

Re: Steve's Kit
« Reply #246 on: October 01, 2015, 08:50:00 pm »
Carradice rack bag fitted to my tourer in an attempt to emulate the mighty teeth grinder.   Club mates think it's funny that the only thing currently in it is a gillet  :-)

Re: Steve's Kit
« Reply #247 on: November 08, 2015, 03:29:07 pm »
Has it been reported anywhere what mileage Steve is getting from his Schwalbe One tyres?  I've done just over 3000 km on mine and, while they look fine, I'm wondering when I'm likely to need to replace!

Re: Steve's Kit
« Reply #248 on: November 20, 2015, 07:40:34 pm »
wondering how his bikes are doing. no news is good news i presume. is he riding one bike and only swapping for another while the first is being serviced?

Re: Steve's Kit
« Reply #249 on: November 20, 2015, 08:37:03 pm »
He has 3 bikes and they get serviced at regular intervals. There was one small crisis where the service interval was a way off but he needed work doing pronto.
<i>Marmite slave</i>