Author Topic: Members' bikes  (Read 1132582 times)

Re: Members' bikes
« Reply #8725 on: September 30, 2017, 08:22:36 pm »
Swapped the bars on the Genesis Equilibrium and converted to a triple chainset. Still need to make final adjustments for comfort. The bars are Nitto RM-3 Gravel. I'm finding the Midge bars on the Cross-Check far more comfortable than conventional drops so thought I'd give them a go on the road bike. Bend and flare are completely different though and distance between levers is very close - but I do like the longer bottom bit (between the brake levers and bar end shifters) - got a set of Love Mud Bombers in the shed if I don't like them.

Looks ace. :thumbsup:  How are you getting on with the Nitto bars?  How do they compare to the Midges and Bombers?

Re: Members' bikes
« Reply #8726 on: October 12, 2017, 03:52:26 pm »


Bought a 1980/1981 frame for cheap of a Gazelle Sprinter Race -- that basically is the Raleigh Super Grand Prix they made in Dieren as well back in the day, but with their own brandname on it. It did not come with a fork, alas, so I had to use a cheap contemporary one, that is a bit too fat. Also, the paint and coating I used on it cured much more yellowish than expected.

Always wanted another Sprinter Race for commuting. I already had a blue one. But that has been build up with an 8 speed internal gear hub. And since that is such a comfortable bike, I have always wondered if a derailleur would not have made it an even better bike.

Ought to mention as well the headlamp is a Spanninga Axendo 60 XDAS I am pretty happy with. Spanninga has bought the Philips technology, when that company stopped making bike lights, and now puts out lights that are basically the same. The rear lights are nearly identical and only around a tenner in the Netherlands, whereas the Philips ones were easily three times as much. And the Axenda 60 XDAS is an upgrade compared to the Philips SafeRide 60 lux lamp. It is a lot cheaper to buy as well, and it has an extra daylight setting.

 


Oscar's dad

  • Cheers!
    • Feast
Re: Members' bikes
« Reply #8727 on: October 13, 2017, 12:48:12 pm »
BJ the On-One Pompino fixie with optional single-speed goodness.  My winter steed and I have finally finished tweaking him so these are the official photos to go into the family album...






BJ is a 57cm frame, the largest Plantet X offer and a bit small for me hence the tons of seat post but he seems comfy enough.  The roads hereabouts will soon be covered in chutney so he'll be a dirty BJ in no time at all; currently he's far too clean.

windy

  • Sitting on a bog in the North Atlantic
    • My Instagram
Re: Members' bikes
« Reply #8728 on: October 15, 2017, 12:25:00 am »
Swapped the bars on the Genesis Equilibrium and converted to a triple chainset. Still need to make final adjustments for comfort. The bars are Nitto RM-3 Gravel. I'm finding the Midge bars on the Cross-Check far more comfortable than conventional drops so thought I'd give them a go on the road bike. Bend and flare are completely different though and distance between levers is very close - but I do like the longer bottom bit (between the brake levers and bar end shifters) - got a set of Love Mud Bombers in the shed if I don't like them.

Looks ace. :thumbsup:  How are you getting on with the Nitto bars?  How do they compare to the Midges and Bombers?

Looks really nice but the levers are too close together and there's not enough room on the tops. It feels a bit twitchy climbing on the hoods but the drops are really comfortable. as a person who spends most of the time on the tops and hoods they're not really my type of bar. I'm in the process of fitting some Bombers

itsbruce

  • Lavender Bike Menace
Re: Members' bikes
« Reply #8729 on: October 23, 2017, 11:06:31 am »
That's brilliant - I'd seen there had been modern reconstructions, but have never seen one in the metal. How does it handle?

The bike arrived the morning of the day I had to fly to Turkey, so I didn't get to try it properly for a while.

Once you get it moving, it's great fun.  The gearing is low and the cranks are small (105mm), so it's a "last mile or so" commuter or a local shopping bike (a shopping basket on the front only increases the stability ;)).  I haven't tried it up anything but the gentlest hills yet (but will be more adventurous because it's huge fun coming back down the hill).  Turns on a dime, as you would think, and the closeness of the handlebars to your thighs is less of an issue than turning on a regular bike with slight toe overlap.

Pedalling is *different*.  You need to sit back a little so your knees aren't hitting the handlebars.  This, with the small cranks, means that your legs are moving in a different way to a normal upright, somewhere between riding a recumbent and a trike with the cranks fixed on the front hub.

Getting started is the biggest challenge for most people (had a bunch of friends round for a party at the weekend and they all had a go).  The small gearing and small cranks make it hard to get momentum from the off.  Until you've learned a way to get started with confidence, there's a few moments of wobbliness before suddenly everything is stable and sedate.  One of my mates said "It's like being a 5 year old again, learning to ride a bike.  Everything is unfamiliar and unsure and then suddenly it all works."

It's a difficult bike for anybody much below or above average height or with short/long legs.  The seat tube moves  like the slide of a trombone, if you see what I mean, so mostly serves to adjust your position relative to the cranks, rather than to the ground.  The stem is very adjustable, so can accommodate long legs, but a short person is going to find themselves perched very precariously on the saddle until they're in motion.  I'm 5'8.5" with slightly short legs for my height and I had to rotate the saddle mount 180 degrees around the seat tube to bring the saddle an inch and a half closer to the ground (f that doesn't seem to make sense, remember that the seat tube is shaped like the central cylinder and grip of a traditional umbrella, with the saddle mounted on the end of the grip).  Even then, I'm on tip-toes when the bike is stationary and I have to put a foot down.

So I'm still getting used to it and haven't pushed its limits yet but it's a huge amount of fun.  There was one grump at the party who said "Why would you want to ride that?" and everybody else yelled "Why would you not?"

That's utterly marvelous. No hinges to fail or creak.

Yes, I do consider it a Brompton alternative - where the non-train part of the trip isn't too challenging ;-)


 Making it road legal is going to be a challenge, especially when I replace the handle bars and reverse the stem so that the steering is more like the 30s version.


On our version, we used a hub brake (we built it into a stripped-out dyno-hub shell)


This one does have a coaster brake in the hub (Shimano CB-E110).  I'm just not sure about the legal status of the front wheel.  I'm not sure the law allows for this particular bike design.

Quote
Riding a velocino feels a very civilised riding position.

Yes!  Very genteel.
I saw the best minds of my generation destroyed by madness, starving hysterical naked: Allen Ginsberg
The best minds of my generation are thinking about how to make people click ads: Jeff Hammerbacher

Re: Members' bikes
« Reply #8730 on: November 01, 2017, 05:17:15 pm »
Hi peeps. I've not been here for a while but thought I'd post this here for posterity as it is no longer.  :'(  After having the frame replaced a few years ago under warranty, I realised that I was maybe just a bit too heavy powerful :P for such a light weight frame and as such it only got used a handful of times once rebuilt.

kic1 by Keith Smith, on Flickr

kic3 by Keith Smith, on Flickr

I couldn't stand seeing it sat in the garage not getting used so I'll be selling the frame, forks and a few other bits and pieces on the classifieds, the rest has been used to build something far more (un)suitable.

Introducing my new  budget hipster TT weapon.

tt1 by Keith Smith, on Flickr

tt2 by Keith Smith, on Flickr

tt3 by Keith Smith, on Flickr

I needed something to aim for to help get me back in shape so a couple of time trials and maybe a short triathlon next year is the plan. Still need to get my position sorted, but I'm quite happy with it so far. Just need to work on reducing the aero belly now.

windy

  • Sitting on a bog in the North Atlantic
    • My Instagram
Re: Members' bikes
« Reply #8731 on: November 02, 2017, 03:07:57 pm »
Got my old Trek MTB back together again :)

Going to change the 'One-One Mary bars for some standard risers. Last used the bike last winter as a single speed commuter. the sweep back on the bars was ok for the 1 1/2 mile ride each way but found it uncomfortable for an hour's ride on the local trails.

IMG_0295 by ian, on Flickr

Re: Members' bikes
« Reply #8732 on: November 05, 2017, 07:35:00 pm »
Got my old Trek MTB back together again :)

Going to change the 'One-One Mary bars for some standard risers. Last used the bike last winter as a single speed commuter. the sweep back on the bars was ok for the 1 1/2 mile ride each way but found it uncomfortable for an hour's ride on the local trails.

IMG_0295 by ian, on Flickr

I found Mary's a bit odd when I tried them too. Think I'd be fitting a stem with much less rise.

Re: Members' bikes
« Reply #8733 on: November 05, 2017, 07:37:53 pm »
New bike for my mate Neil



Lightly used Kinesis 5T frame and various bits courtesy of people on here and the odd new part - thanks all who helped out. Cheery range gear cable outer and 35mm Vittoria Voyager Hypers for comfort and because he's a bigger lad than I am.

Carousel here

https://northernwheelandbike.wordpress.com/2017/11/05/neils-kinesis-5t/#jp-carousel-181

Sorry pics are poor - I've not got control of the little camera yet. Does too much too easily...

Mike

windy

  • Sitting on a bog in the North Atlantic
    • My Instagram
Re: Members' bikes
« Reply #8734 on: November 06, 2017, 06:28:58 pm »


I found Mary's a bit odd when I tried them too. Think I'd be fitting a stem with much less rise.

I'm 6'2" and it's an old 20" frame with not very sloping top tube and a low stack height. I need the steep rise to get the bars high enough - got some riser bars with less sweep back on the way too.


slope

  • Ride Fettle Ride
    • Current pedalable joys
Re: Members' bikes
« Reply #8735 on: November 18, 2017, 04:57:45 pm »
Here we go again - yet another 1980s steely bike project





Wobbly G-alaxy by Paul Weston


Re: Members' bikes
« Reply #8736 on: November 18, 2017, 04:58:32 pm »
Nice  :)
Quote from: Kim
^ This woman knows what she's talking about.

windy

  • Sitting on a bog in the North Atlantic
    • My Instagram
Re: Members' bikes
« Reply #8737 on: November 18, 2017, 06:28:40 pm »
Lovely colour and lugs. I thought the Galaxy had cantilever bosses?

Torslanda

  • Professional Gobshite
  • Just a tart for retro kit . . .
    • John's Bikes
Re: Members' bikes
« Reply #8738 on: November 22, 2017, 01:46:52 am »
That's beautiful lining. $deity really is in the detail.

I'm no expert but Galaxy/Super Galaxy models came with centre pull brakes until some point in the mid-80s. Courtesy of the Clariflies I have one. My 90s Galaxy (full STX group) has cantis.

Despite breathing, sleeping & eating bike for the last 5 years I don't have an anorak. Yet...
VELOMANCER

Well that's the more blunt way of putting it but as usual he's dead right.

slope

  • Ride Fettle Ride
    • Current pedalable joys
Re: Members' bikes
« Reply #8739 on: November 22, 2017, 08:58:48 am »
Lovely colour and lugs. I thought the Galaxy had cantilever bosses?

That's beautiful lining. $deity really is in the detail.

I'm no expert but Galaxy/Super Galaxy models came with centre pull brakes until some point in the mid-80s. Courtesy of the Clariflies I have one. My 90s Galaxy (full STX group) has cantis.

Despite breathing, sleeping & eating bike for the last 5 years I don't have an anorak. Yet...

Indeed, the frame I have just acquired from its original owner is a 1980, although resprayed a non original but rather nice BRG about 10 years ago.

Frame, forks and chunky steel headset weigh 7lb 2oz for the non weight non weenies ;)

Here's a couple of pages from the 1982 catalogue :)




windy

  • Sitting on a bog in the North Atlantic
    • My Instagram
Re: Members' bikes
« Reply #8740 on: November 22, 2017, 09:05:30 am »
Of course - 1980 pre-cantilever (I was working in a bike shop selling Dawes at the time, how could I forget)  :-[

Oscar's dad

  • Cheers!
    • Feast
Re: Members' bikes
« Reply #8741 on: November 22, 2017, 09:12:25 am »
In the 80s there was nothing wrong with Weinmann centre pull brakes. In 1987 I did a 9 week European tour which included the Alps with those brakes, Aztec brake blocks and Nutrak Nomad tyres fitted to my fully loaded Raleigh Clubman and it was all absolutely fine!

windy

  • Sitting on a bog in the North Atlantic
    • My Instagram
Re: Members' bikes
« Reply #8742 on: November 25, 2017, 01:31:28 pm »
In the 80s there was nothing wrong with Weinmann centre pull brakes. In 1987 I did a 9 week European tour which included the Alps with those brakes, Aztec brake blocks and Nutrak Nomad tyres fitted to my fully loaded Raleigh Clubman and it was all absolutely fine!

Used them on my first cyclo-cross bike (it was also my first circuit racing, time trial, club run, town and training bike)  ;D

Cyclo Cross by ian, on Flickr

Oscar's dad

  • Cheers!
    • Feast
Re: Members' bikes
« Reply #8743 on: November 27, 2017, 01:12:23 pm »
 ;D