Author Topic: Have you been out today on a Perm or DIY?  (Read 44660 times)

deejay

  • A wise man goes when he can
Re: Have you been out today on a Perm or DIY?
« Reply #400 on: June 03, 2018, 09:21:34 am »
I was out doing a DIY200 yesterday. On the run in the Red Lodge near Newmarket when I met two other riders. One was wearing a Audax Ireland gilet. We had a brief  conversation and it turned out that the audax rider was on a DIY250 starting at Peterborough and had just met the other rider. I assumed everyone would be heading for the famous cafe but in the end I was the only one that stopped. I am just wondering if it was anyone from hear. I hope the day went well for you.

JT

Pingu

  • Put away those fiery biscuits!
  • Mrs Pingu's domestique
    • the Igloo
Re: Have you been out today on a Perm or DIY?
« Reply #401 on: June 07, 2018, 09:28:00 am »
A DIY by GPS:

Mrs P's first 300 (subject to validation)  8) She doesn't mention the steep cobbly climb up Bosberg - must've erased that one from her mind :)

I nearly filled up the AUK DIY by GPS entry form with controls for this one!


Quote from: Mrs Pingu
So, The Audacious Maattentart Heist: 0450 start wearing all the clothes. Saw lots of kitties on the canal path doing a spot of early morning hunting, as well as a giant metallic bat. 2nd brekky in Deinze was Maattentart from a van at the market. Then off up through the Flemish Ardennes for Dan 's fix of hills and the weather warmed up and we had wall to wall sunshine. Turned north in a bit of a head wind back on to the flat. Antwerp full of crap expensive shops. Down through the Sint Anna tunnel under the Scheldt which was very chilly after the 30ish °C on the surface. A flat bit next to the motorway which ate up the kms a bit with the wind behind us, before we got to the Dutch coast and quite a lot of interminably dull route behind the Zeedijk into a head or a cross wind. At this point the 3 litres of water consumed started to turn into a yen for a big sachet of salt and a can of fizzy pop. Some kilometers later we found a friteur and much rejoicing was done. After that more trundling along the usually heaving route past Cadzand and Knokke Heist which was happily dead at that time of night. Nice sunset and then finally we turned away from the coast on the last stretch into Bruges. Also seen: storks, several hunting kestrels, various dogs, cats sheep all flaked out in the sun, some hares and a dead cow in a farmyard.



That tunnel:


IMG_0983_01 by The Pingus, on Flickr

bhoot

  • MemSec (ex-Mrs RRtY)
Re: Have you been out today on a Perm or DIY?
« Reply #402 on: June 13, 2018, 11:14:47 pm »
Five islands, four causeways, no ferries, and quite a few birds*
On holiday in the Outer Hebrides we checked out the possibility of a 200km DIY and found out that it was possible to cycle that far without taking any ferries or falling into the sea. We started at Berneray ferry terminal, headed over the first causeway of the day and then south west to Balranald (corncrakes, redshanks, oystercatchers) and then south over the next three causeways to the Hebridean Jewellery coffee shop at the north end of South Uist for bacon rolls. Suitably refreshed, south again (curlews and short eared owl) to the Kilbride campsite cafe at the south end of the island, with a great view across to Barra - for the previous two weeks this would have been of white sand and sparkling turquoise water but the weather had broken and it was a bit grey all day. Turnaround point, so back now into the wind and we realised why the northbound touring cyclists we had met earlier were looking slightly grim! Next stop via one causeway was Benbecula (shelduck and chicks) for a control at McLennans supermarket where we sat outside on compost bags (much more comfortable than petrol station charcoal) and ate typical audax fare of yoghurt and rock buns and drank chocolate milk. Back across two more causeways (with the small island of Grimsay between them) to North Uist and the Lochmaddy ATM (a rare facility around here) to control. The final leg (more oystercatchers, swans, redshanks, a raven, maybe an eagle) across the last causeway of the day back to Berneray, fortunately arriving before the last ferry of the day from Harris disgorged its vehicles onto the singletrack road.
* We could in fact have bagged one more island and causeway by going to Eriskay but we didn't actually need to for 200km

Re: Have you been out today on a Perm or DIY?
« Reply #403 on: June 14, 2018, 04:08:44 pm »
I was out doing a DIY200 yesterday. On the run in the Red Lodge near Newmarket when I met two other riders. One was wearing a Audax Ireland gilet. We had a brief  conversation and it turned out that the audax rider was on a DIY250 starting at Peterborough and had just met the other rider. I assumed everyone would be heading for the famous cafe but in the end I was the only one that stopped. I am just wondering if it was anyone from hear. I hope the day went well for you.

JT

Yes that was me. Nice bumping onto you. I was doing a route check for the south part of the Yorkshire via Essex(The Flatlands Reversed), http://www.aukweb.net/events/detail/18-382/ and it controls at the NISA store centre in Red Lodge and not at the cafe. Was not trying to avoid you ;D. Always good to see others enjoying the weather and riding their bike.

,

Re: Have you been out today on a Perm or DIY?
« Reply #404 on: June 16, 2018, 08:29:57 pm »
great one way 200 Edinburgh - Stonehaven after last weeks Southern Upland 400km.

I booked the 1510 train home so left at 0500 which also helped me keep ahead of the rain.,,...for a while. 

Lovely sunrise behind the Forth Road Bridge (see @graeme_wyllie on twitter) and mostly favourable SE winds. 

Heavy rain by Forfar 120km and steady thereafter.   

My body is back getting used to a single stop on a 200 so i was just over 9 hrs and had about 45 mins to spare after getting changed.

A couple of pints in the Station Hotel while watching the football and a wee snooze on the train home.  Fab day despite rain

https://ridewithgps.com/trips/24387738

Feanor

  • It's mostly downhill from here.
Re: Have you been out today on a Perm or DIY?
« Reply #405 on: June 16, 2018, 08:55:45 pm »
Nice one, YleeG.
Shame you won't be at Fordoun tomorrow. I'm currently trying to moderate my wine consumption this evening, which is a bit of a nuisance!

,

Re: Have you been out today on a Perm or DIY?
« Reply #406 on: June 16, 2018, 09:29:51 pm »
Nice one, YleeG.
Shame you won't be at Fordoun tomorrow. I'm currently trying to moderate my wine consumption this evening, which is a bit of a nuisance!
aye, I was given my orders to keep tomorrow free for Fathers Day.  Good luck!  I really must get out on the TT bike and get some practicce

Re: Have you been out today on a Perm or DIY?
« Reply #407 on: June 18, 2018, 07:52:10 am »
I churned out the Dark and White Peak 200KM Perm on Saturday. Easily my hardest 200KM ride to date with 4000m of ascent recorded and a persistent strong headwind for every Southbound mile. Spectacular scenery though. A highly recommended ride!


deejay

  • A wise man goes when he can
Re: Have you been out today on a Perm or DIY?
« Reply #409 on: June 21, 2018, 12:28:08 pm »
Always good to see others enjoying the weather and riding their bike.

Yep, it was a good day in the end if a little wet at the start for me. It threatened to thunder near the finish as I rolled back through Bury St Edmunds and Stowmarket but nothing came of it.
 :thumbsup:

JT

Re: Have you been out today on a Perm or DIY?
« Reply #410 on: June 22, 2018, 01:25:25 pm »
Seven of best (or worst) climbs in the Cotswolds... hopefully 2 AAA points when validated

https://www.strava.com/activities/1654567082

Re: Have you been out today on a Perm or DIY?
« Reply #411 on: June 28, 2018, 05:59:36 pm »
200 yesterday in a last-ditch attempt to keep my RRTY going. Up the A38 to Gloucester for elevenses (more like tenses, but any time is good) then out over Alney Island and up to Ledbury, where I spent far too much time eating ice cream and generally looking around. There's a lot to look at in a small town, I must go back on another occasion without time pressure. On further north, continuing into a headwind, to the turning point at Bromyard. From Ledbury to Bromyard is really not very far but the heat and the headwind where draining me (nothing to do with being unfit, oh no) so I found a cosy little cafe where I had a cup of tea and a cheese and onion toastie. Bromyard is in a valley, which I hadn't taken any notice of when planning. I did on the way out. Fortunately the road out actually seemed a shallower gradient than the one in. I also hadn't paid much attention to riding along the A465 for several miles. You can't always tell with A roads unless you know them; some are horrible, some lovely. Even primary status isn't an infallible guide. Fortunately the A465 had not much traffic but gave me the benefit of a smooth surface, easy gradients and no give ways.

I crossed the Wye at Holme Lacy and the steep stuff started. Again, maps and signs aren't everything. The first hill the OS consider worthy of a chevron left me unimpressed while others with no chevrons were far more taxing. The descent into Hoarwithy manages to combine a chevron, meaning at least 14%, with a road sign indicating 10%. In this case, I reckon it's at least 14%. It's also quite potholed, so I rushed down in a clanging of luggage, bottles and Garmin! By now it was really hot – the computer on my bike indicated 33 degrees! – so I did something quite unusual for me, stopped at a rural pub (it wasn't in a village, just at a crossroads) and drank some orange juice and lemonade, which I found really refreshing. (But why does it cost more than beer?)

The hottest was yet to come though. The road out of Monmouth to Trellech starts with a long climb. It's never steep but it never stops and the road is quite exposed. It felt like five miles though looking at the map I think it's only about two. I went right down the cassette, kept my cadence steady and was glad to reach the top. So was my average speed, which increased noticeably as I freewheeled at 50-odd km/h towards Chepstow; I'd been bumping against the time limit before. Chepstow, of course, is virtually a suburb of Bristol (or vice versa?) so from there it's just a question of following my nose. Home, and there were peaches!
The earth is vast and beautiful and contains many miraculous places. (Chekhov)

Pingu

  • Put away those fiery biscuits!
  • Mrs Pingu's domestique
    • the Igloo
Re: Have you been out today on a Perm or DIY?
« Reply #412 on: July 08, 2018, 10:59:32 am »
Today's ride turned out to be an exercise in poor nutrition and hydration (because I forgot my wallet). Conclusion: either don't forget your wallet or carry enough food and water to get you round sans dosh. I do these things so you don't have to  ::-)

Anyway, a lovely day to be out on the bike. Had a puncture at @ 20k in - boo and indeed literally hiss >:-( . Bastard headwind from Dufftown got bastardier as the afternoon wore on. Not much wildlife spotted - some buzzards, an oystercatcher chick and a smelly dead deer.

Met that Feanor on the Col de Chapel of Garioch  :)

Superior arrivée on this event  :)



LittleWheelsandBig

  • Whimsy Rider
Re: Have you been out today on a Perm or DIY?
« Reply #413 on: July 08, 2018, 03:17:58 pm »
The Wee McTaggart and I tandemed round the Horses for Courses 200 perm yesterday, along with megajoules expenditure and HK on solos. Not too much in the way of hills but quite a bit of fluid consumed. It turned out that Snetterton Circuit wouldn't let us into the cafe without each of us purchasing a £16 ticket to watch the racing, despite advice to the contrary. A food stop a little further along the route seemed like a better use of our readies.
Wheel meet again, don't know where, don't know when...

Re: Have you been out today on a Perm or DIY?
« Reply #414 on: July 22, 2018, 11:29:42 am »
Yes. And it's only 11 o'clock! Oh, but it was yesterday I went out. So 24 hours ago IanN and I were somewhere between Tetbury and Melksham on a 200km route of his devising, which I christened the Veloviewer Special – he gave it another name – thanks to the various dead-ends and "straight-on dog legs" he incorporated into it for the sake of upping his Veloviewer score! (see thread elsewhere). Perhaps a route with dead-ends sounds odd, frustrating even, but in fact they were bucolic gems in a scenic route, leading us down tiny lanes you would otherwise ignore. The route was out of Bristol up through Wickwar to Tetbury, this section incorporating a 1 in 4(!), Minety, turning south and skirting Chippenham down to Westbury, where the White Horse followed us, then up to Freshford before heading in to Bath along the canal (gravel, drunks, travellers, holidaymakers, dogs and an electric fat bike) and cruising home on the cycle path. Ian was suffering in the heat and ran out of water, even I drank two bottles, which is unusual for me (in addition to copious amounts of tea – and thumbs up to the Folly Row cafe in Kington St Michael, which grasped without being prompted the dimensions of an audaxer's thirst for tea!).
The earth is vast and beautiful and contains many miraculous places. (Chekhov)

,

Re: Have you been out today on a Perm or DIY?
« Reply #415 on: July 23, 2018, 09:20:40 am »
Given that 6 weekends in a row (starting next weekend) feture no cycling for me, I bit the bullet and did aDIY600.  I wasn't feeling great at the end of the Hereward the Wake 300 last weekend so set off with some trepidation. 

Although my heart wasnt entirely in it in the days beforehand (a surefire DNF indicator I find) I decided to catch the train to Darlington and head south to Goole to link up with the Flatlands course, turning north shortly after Sleaford.  Id booked the Premier inn in canwick which was at the 360km mark for wash n sleeps.  The idea was for a gentlemans 600 in nice weather few hills and a proper sleep Saturday night. 

I set off at 0600 Saturday and stopped at Leeming for breakfast around 40km and made steady progress through Ripon to York.  After Boroughbridge I went via Aldborough (much nicer and flatter than yon lumpy busy B road) and used the bike path into York to avoid the A19 - very nice. 

A big early M&S Food lunch in York and then southwards to Goole (150km) and Gainsborough to Lincoln (220km) where I had  a huge plate of fish and chips on Burton Rd, checked in to my hotel and dumped a few bits and bobs.  A quick turnaround means that no thoughts of staying put were entertained and I was back out.  The B1188 after Canwick was too busy for my liking so I zigged zagged south knowing that all I had to do was to go through my controls at Sleaford then Threekingham by any route (the benefits of a GPS advisory route).  I even found a ford in those lanes - perhaps the last running water in the UK??   I turned north expecting a headwind but it wasn't too bad, I think the wind had dropped at almost exactly the same time.  It was dark when I reached the ford for the 2nd time and a back wheel slide woke me up a bit!!

I reached Canwick (360km) just before midnight, so I was "up" on my target of 20kph overall.  No dramas about taking my bike in the room either which was great.  Phone on charge, job done....zzzz.....press "reset".

However, 240km is a tad longer that Id want on Day 2 so after a wash and a snooze I was away super early at 0430.  I shunned the "booze Britain" McDonalds in favour of the petrol station on the northern outskirts.  Guy in front of me was buying two bottles of wine...at 5am...."just the strongest you've got love...".  I forgot that its possible to buy alcohol at any time of the day in Eng ger land (verboten 2200 - 1000 in Scotland, and not that long ago really that it was banned entirely on a Sunday.)

I wasn't hungry but knew I needed something so fuelled up on milkshakes and frappe.  Large latte and a whole packet of Jaffa cakes in Gainsborough hit the spot and allowed me to keep a pleasingly steady pace to Glews in Goole where I was properly hungry and got the arm and leg warmers off and sun cream on.  At this point I realised my arms were a bit red from the day before which had been mostly overcast!

Nice section north through Howden and Bubwith towards York, though the traffic on the run in to York was annoying.  York is up there with Perth imho for out and out bad driving - my theory is that the driving is worst in medium sized places that aren't close to the largest urban areas.  Folk get used to driving fast and in/around York I find it noticeably anti cyclist - a few close passes had me tetchy.

Anyhow, lunch and ice creams at M&S in York marked the 500km point which was something of a morale booster, and I retraced on the cycle path which was a lovely antidote to the busy run in from the south. Ripon was quite busy, something was taking place at the racecourse and I was glad to be on my way north through Wath to join the road beside the A1M.  This had been very quiet on the way south but was very busy when I joined it though it got quieter after Leeming. 

I had the radio on via my earpiece and listening to the golf helped the kms count down.  At Catterick I knew I was on familiar roads from the Yorkshire Gallop and despite there being a few lumps and bumps it was such a lovely day and I had loads of time in hand so I sunned myself on a grassy bank somewhere near Scorton and reminded myself how well I was doing. 

I really slowed up in the final 20km and the hill up over the railway at Croft on Tees was like the Alpe but I rolled into Darlo around 1745 so just under 36 hrs.  My train back to Edinburgh was after 2100 so I had a wash and a snooze before having a couple of pre train pints in the Quakerhouse.  It appears to be the only decent pub in Darlington which has the added benefit of a courtyard so I can keep an eye on my bike. The guy running the place recognised me from last time, I think I might be classed  "regular" now.  A guy was just finishing his live set indoors, which initially I thought was a mercy but he was actually quite good and I chastised myself for wishing him not to be there when I arrived! 

This was about as straightforward as a 600 is going to get, with molly coddling at 360km and good weather (though it was a tad hot on Sunday if Im being churlish!).  Glad its done.  left foot was a bit numb after 300km, and my hands ache a bit.  Legs are a bit of a mess, not sure if that's insect bites or sweat rash.  However on the inside they feel good enough this morning that Ive got my kit for my regular Monday spin class after work.   Got cramp in the pub so I had a tonic water chaser and salted peanuts with my ahem 2nd pint. 

So, subject to validation, that's my 14th consecutive SR.  One more maybe.....one more eh?                     

     

Pingu

  • Put away those fiery biscuits!
  • Mrs Pingu's domestique
    • the Igloo
Re: Have you been out today on a Perm or DIY?
« Reply #416 on: August 03, 2018, 09:37:10 pm »
A 400km DIY by GPS consisting of two loops from FurryBootToon.

The first Deeside loop started at 6am. There was a niggly headwind as far as Kirriemuir and then a warm wind assisted ride back home. Lots of sunshine. A couple of cyclists near Braemar waved vigorously and shouted something that sounded like "Sunday!"  ???

After tea was taken Mrs P gently encouraged me on the night time northern loop. It started raining at about half past eight and didn't stop until after midnight. At least it wasn't cold. Turning back was seriously considered, but I never got round to it. I nearly got taken out by a wowbadger on a descent towards Fyvie.

That's the UR done (subject to validation, of course).






Re: Have you been out today on a Perm or DIY?
« Reply #417 on: August 06, 2018, 04:00:03 pm »
I rode half a 600 on Saturday. So that's a 300? No! That's not the way audax arithmetic works! My friend Ian (occasionally posting here as IanN) was determined to be certified as a super random nutter. To this end he needed to ride a 600, which is about double anything he's ridden in previous years, so a big step up. He set out on Friday morning and had a pleasant ride to Salisbury then out to Basingstoke, where the attraction is that you can ride on a gravel path across a golf course. Whether this path passes between bunker and green or between 18th and 19th holes I neglected to ask. Cycling, it was fashionable to claim a few years ago, is the new golf, so logically golf must be the old cycling. Ian would be the last person to deny his retro streak, so would he come back converted to putting and chipping, hang up his wheels and ditch the lycra in favour of loud checks? No, he wouldn't. Shimano no longer make golf equipment and he's about to jump for Campagnolo. Instead, he came back with a justified grumble about a lime green Aston Martin.

But that was Friday. On Saturday, having looped home for a shower and at least 45 minutes sleep, he met me at the Banana Bridge (yes, this is a thing) and we looped off for his second loop, my first. He'd actually done 360km on Friday so Saturday was to be only 240km – hence not a 300. We set off in a generally southward direction and immediately outside Long Ashton (twinned with Las Vegas in the audax-verse) saw a man who appeared to hand-scything a field of wheat. Must be for artisanal hand-crafted single-harvester bread, we decided, and this became a theme of the day; the single-bush coffee, single-tree cider (yes, we rode through the Thatcher's orchard in Somerset), and so on, reaching its apogee in the artisanal hand-crafted single-hen scotch egg – which happened to be part of Ian's lunch!

What about all the exciting things before lunch? There was the Flax Bourton Greenway, which is lovely but far too short, and the Somerset Levels, which were full of dragonflies, buzzards, butterflies, pumping stations and even an alpaca. There were the un-level bits around the edges of the Levels, which are not high but surprisingly steep. Then there was Pilton, home of the famous pop festival, past a farmhouse with a big letterbox labelled 'Eavis', and further on some teepee glamping. Then from grey stone to stone so yellow you'd think it had been painted (but it's the natural colour) in Castle Cary (home of the single-hen single-handed egg).

And what better to do after lunch on a scorching hot summer day than visit the English seaside? So we headed off towards Brent Knoll and Bridgwater, where we hoisted our bikes up a set of steps next to a rather rust railway bridge over the River Parrett – or maybe it was the Sedgemoor Drain. But Bridgwater isn't really the seaside so we carried on to Burnham-on-Sea, where the beach pulsed with happy holidaymakers splashing in the warm, clean water and building castles on the golden sand. Actually, all the families and kids had gone home because by now it was after 7 p.m. (I've compressed the timescale a little) and we were in search of sustenance for our continued exploits, so we pressed our way through the throngs of tourists and fishermen that characterise the Somerset coastal towns until we found a small taverna, humble but clean, which served us fish plucked from the nets that day, washed down with scrumpy from the vats of fermenting apples in one of the farms just two miles inland. And all for two shillings. Oh, you're so cynical! Alright, the town was dead. We found a Subway which lured us in with its glowing red lanterne open sign... the door was locked! So we gesticulated at the manager visible inside, indicating to him that the opening hours painted on the window said he should be open till 9, so why wasn't he opening his doors to two hungry, sweaty, tired, wild-eyed cyclists? And lo! he did. Real audax glamour, opens all the right doors.

Which was great but we still had 80-odd km to go. Good bye to the Levels, though we followed the coast a little more, then struck inland through Banwell and up to Wrington, where for some gratuitious reason we rode up this:
http://www.streetmap.co.uk/idld.srf?X=347597&Y=163427&A=Y&Z=120&lm=1
Which is okay during the day, but somehow at night, when you can't see the top, feels intimidating. And the ripply surface on the very steepest section (just before the corner at the top) means your front wheel is always on the point of leaving the ground. After that it was pretty much downhill and then just bash along the main road back into the big bad city. And home. Congratulations to Ian on his super random nutter certifiableness, I was knackered having done less than half his distance!
The earth is vast and beautiful and contains many miraculous places. (Chekhov)